Spring Has Sprung! Let’s Celebrate with a Photo Contest!

By Julia Williams

In my neck of the woods, spring can be a tad fickle. In other words, even though the calendar says it’s officially springtime, the weather may or may not follow suit. In fact, sometimes winter drags on here for what seems like forever.

Thankfully, this year looks pretty good so far (knock on wood) and I am celebrating the arrival of warm(er) weather. CANIDAE is celebrating the season too, with a spring-themed photo contest for all of their customers and fans!

How to Enter

Just grab your camera and be ready to capture your cat or dog doing whatever you think best embodies the spring season. Whether that’s wearing bunny ears, sniffing daffodils, visiting the Easter Bunny, or just exuberantly enjoying the nice spring weather…snap away!

Then share your best spring-themed photo of your cat or dog on the CANIDAE Facebook photo contest page, and you might win 6 months of free CANIDAE natural pet food!

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Why Do Dogs Love Having their Ears Rubbed?

By Langley Cornwell

One of our rescue dogs is skittish and fearful. We are always on the lookout for ways to help this dog relax and take it easy. We’ve done all kinds of behavioral work and tried multiple training techniques. The good news is that he seems to making progress. Even so, there is plenty of work that still needs to be done.

The other evening after he finished eating his favorite grain free dog food – CANIDAE PURE Elements with Lamb – he was lying on the sofa next to me and I began rubbing his ears. He snuggled closer and I began to feel all of the tension slowly leaving his body; it was if someone had stuck a tiny pin in a ball and the air was seeping out gradually. I know all the tricks for putting our cat into this state of relaxed euphoria, but I’d never been able to get this dog to fully let go until that moment. With a big grin on his goofy, loveable face, he fell into a happy trance.

It turns out that rubbing a dog’s ears is a natural sedative, almost like a tranquilizer.

Nerve Centers

The ears of a dog are one of three nerve centers on his body. The other nerve centers Dog-Animated-no-offerare between his toes and the center of his belly; all of these places are extremely sensitive to the touch. The benefit of knowing where these nerve centers are is that you know where to rub your dog to instigate relaxation. And it’s more than simple relaxation. When you stroke your dog’s ears, the sensation he feels goes further than just the ears themselves. The intense pleasure he feels extends deep into his body.

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The Unlikely Animal Friends in the New Android Commercial

By Linda Cole

Every now and then, a commercial comes along that actually gets your attention. A new Android commercial, “Friends Furever,” not only got my attention, it also made me smile. It features 18 different unlikely animal friends, set to the toe tapping tune “Oo-de-lally” from the 1973 Disney animated movie “Robin Hood,” sung by Roger Miller.

The interspecies friendships in this heartwarming commercial show us how simple it is to get along – if we just try. Most of the animals featured were rescued by humans, but found comfort and healing through a special bond with an unlikely animal friend. Here are some of their stories:

Orangutan and Bluetick Hound

After losing his parents, Suryia the orangutan was rescued and sent to an animal sanctuary in Myrtle Beach, SC. He was withdrawn and refused to eat. To cheer him up, caretakers took him on elephant rides to a nearby pond to play. One day, a skinny hound followed them home. He refused to leave and kept finding ways into the sanctuary to be near Suryia. The sanctuary adopted him when an owner couldn’t be found. Normally dogs are afraid of primates, but these two developed an inseparable bond.

Rhino and Sheep

In 2014, staffers from the Hoedspruit Endangered Species Center in South Africa found a baby rhino next to his mother. Poachers had killed the adult rhino for her horn. Knowing the traumatized baby would die if left alone, he was sedated and taken back to the center. The little rhino, named Gertjie by the staff, was scared and apprehensive. To comfort him, a sheep was brought in and became his surrogate mother.

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The Benefits of Booties for Dogs

By Laurie Darroch

Although dogs have thick pads on their feet and they are built to weather all kinds of climates and terrain, there are situations where booties can add protection for their feet. When their own natural protection is not enough, booties will help to keep their feet free of injury.

Dog booties come in many different styles and materials designed for specific uses, ranging from weather extremes and injury protection to fun and everything in between.

Seasonal Booties

The extremes of weather can wreak havoc on your dog’s feet. Ice and snow can hurt feet that are not used to walking in the cold, and the sharp ice can cut through the pads of their feet. If you take your dog out to play in the snow, the addition of booties will protect their feet and provide additional insulation.

Dogs can benefit from wearing protective booties in the summer as well, particularly on scorcher days when the pavement or sand is extremely hot. Think about it; if the pavement or sand is too hot for you to walk on with bare feet, it’s probably uncomfortable for your canine friend as well. Dogs can get burned or frozen feet the same way you can.

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Can Dogs and Cats Get Acne?

By Linda Cole

Acne is something most teenagers have to deal with growing up, and is a condition that can follow some people into their adult years. Humans aren’t the only species, however, that can get pimples. Dogs and cats can also get acne. It won’t make them want to hide until their complexion clears up, but acne can be a problem and cause discomfort for some pets. Stress can be one cause, but there are other reasons why dogs and cats get pimples.

For dogs, their teenage years usually begin around five to eight months of age. This is the time when canines can develop acne on their lips, muzzle, chin and sometimes around their genitals. Fortunately, it only lasts for a short while; once dogs reach their first birthday the acne will most likely disappear.

Acne in dogs begins as raised areas that are hard and red in appearance. Dogs can even have blackheads. Sometimes pimples become itchy, inflamed, swollen and painful when touched. If scratched by the dog, they can pop open and could lead to a secondary infection.

In canines, acne can be caused by hormonal changes, trauma, bacterial infection, allergies, poor diet or poor hygiene, and is more common in breeds with short coats like the Rottweiler, Boxer, Bulldog, Doberman Pinscher and Great Dane. Why some breeds are more predisposed than others is unknown. Signs your dog is dealing with acne include bumps underneath the skin, blackheads/whiteheads, red bumps, redness, swelling, inflammation, itching, hard patches of skin, blisters, small lesions. Some dogs with acne will rub along the carpet or furniture.

Acne in cats is not limited to their teenage years, and can be a recurring life-Dog-Animated-no-offerlong issue. Some cats, however, may have one episode of pimples and never have another one the rest of their lives. It’s unknown what exactly causes pimples in cats, but it could be related to stress, poor grooming habits, a problem with the immune system, or an excessive amount of oil produced by sebaceous glands under the chin. Excess skin oil can clog pores which could be an indication of allergies or an underlying skin condition. Keratin is a protein found the hair, claws and upper layer of the skin, and will sometimes plug up pores causing acne. If your cat does develop acne, you can see what looks like specks of black dirt around the lips and underside of the chin. Acne can be mistaken for flea debris.

Pimples can become infected and swollen. Symptoms to watch for in cats include pain, blackheads/whiteheads, mild reddish pimples, a watery crust on your cat’s chin or lips, swelling around the chin, hair loss, reddish skin, bleeding, itching, and small fluid-filled bumps on the skin.

If your cat develops acne, it could be an allergic reaction to a plastic food or water bowl. Replacing plastic with ceramic or stainless steel bowls might be all you need to do to clear up your pet’s pimples. If you stick with plastic bowls, it’s important to wash them daily. Plastic bowls can hold bacteria which is then picked up by a super-sensitive feline as she eats.

If you find pimples on your dog or cat, never squeeze them because it could cause a serious infection as well as scarring. Don’t use human medications to treat your pet’s acne, either.

Pet acne can be caused by food allergies or other skin conditions. A poor diet lacking in nutrients, vitamins and minerals can not only leave a pet feeling unsatisfied after eating, it also plays a huge role in their overall health. Switching to a high quality diet like CANIDAE natural pet food helps address food allergies and skin conditions.

Never underestimate the importance of good hygiene. Excess oil and a dirty coat can contribute to acne. Oral health is also important. Brushing your pet’s teeth helps control and eliminate bacteria in the mouth that can contribute to acne. Some dogs and cats may need a little help keeping their chin and the area around the mouth clean. Wiping their face off after they eat can help prevent acne. Dogs that get a buildup of saliva in the hair around their mouth should also have their face wiped off to keep it clean and dry.

Acne isn’t a serious problem for most dogs or cats, but it can be severe for some. There are also other medical conditions that can resemble acne. The two most common conditions are a type of noncontagious mange, and ringworm which is a fungal infection. Both need to be treated by a vet. If it turns out to be acne, your vet will prescribe pet safe acne treatment.

Top photo by Luca 4891/Flickr
Bottom photo by Hunda/Flickr

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Should I Shave My Dog’s Fur in Hot Weather?

By Laurie Darroch

As the weather changes from cold to hot, you may feel that your dog would stay cooler if you cut his fur. However, before you do that, you need to think about what type of dog you have and what the layers of fur actually do for a dog, particularly if they are a double coated breed.

Look into the type of coat your particular dog has. Not all coats are the same, and what may seem cooler to you may not actually be helping your dog. In many cases, it’s better to opt for daily grooming and maintenance instead of shaving off your dog’s protective fur. You may be doing more damage than good by removing natural covering.

Types of Dog Hair

Some dogs have what is called a double coat. It is actually two layers of hair that are meant to protect the dog from the elements, including heat. The undercoat is thicker and softer than the overcoat. The double layers actually trap cooler air in against the dog’s body. It is built-in insulation. Huskies and German Shepherds are two types of dogs with double coats. It may look hot to you and be work to take care of their coat, but you may be doing them a disservice by shaving them if it is not absolutely necessary because of extreme coat damage.

Other dog breeds have single coats, such as the Doberman Pinscher or the French Bulldog. Some dogs are non-shedders or low shedders, such as the Poodle, Kerry Blue Terrier or Lakeland Terrier, but some non-shedders or low shedders can be double coated as well. The point is to know and understand your particular dog’s breed and coat type before you make any decisions regarding shaving or clipping for hot weather.

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