Yearly Archives: 2011

The Pongo Fund Pet Food Bank, 2.5 Million Meals Later

By Julia Williams

Years ago, a kind-hearted pet lover had a dream. Where some might hope to strike it rich or “make it big,” Larry Chusid’s dream was more altruistic – he wanted to help the needy feed their pets. He wanted to make a difference in their lives by helping them keep the animals they dearly loved.

In November of 2009, Larry’s dream became a reality when The Pongo Fund Pet Food Bank opened in Portland, Oregon. I’ve written about it here before, because were it not for CANIDAE and their initial $125,000 donation of pet food, Larry might still be in dreaming mode. But he isn’t, and it warms my heart to know that many, many people and their pets have benefitted because one man dared to dream, and a caring company generously gave what was needed to get this pet food bank going.

As often happens in life, seemingly chance events are life-changing moments. So it was with Larry when he met some CANIDAE folks at a pet-product trade show. The decision CANIDAE made to support The Pongo Fund has greatly impacted not only Larry’s life, but countless thousands of people and pets in their time of need. Now, just two years later, The Pongo Fund partners with more than 100 emergency food agencies, shelters and rescues in Oregon and SW Washington. By providing pet food to anyone with an honest need, Pongo succeeds in both reducing shelter populations and keeping people and their pets together.

I recently caught up with Larry to ask how things have been going.

Me: How many pounds of pet food have been distributed since opening day? 

Larry: We focus on individual quality meals, because each meal is a lifeline. In total we’ve provided more than 2,500,000 quality meals for approximately 42,000 animals belonging to nearly 19,000 families.

CANIDAE has been our primary partner since Day One. We could not do what we do without their consistent generosity and support. Our relationship goes well beyond simply donating food. They are our partner in the fight against hunger.

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Top 10 Pedigreed Cat Breeds

By Langley Cornwell

The Cat Fanciers’ Association, the largest global registry of pedigreed cat breeds, recognizes 42 different breeds. Out of the 42, some breeds seem to make the ‘most popular’ list year after year. Here is a list of pedigreed cat breeds that often top the charts. 

Persian

Have you ever seen a photograph of a fluffy, white, longhaired cat lounging in the background of a fancy reading room or formal living room? If so, the cat was probably a Persian. One of the most popular cat breeds, Persians are gorgeous – and photogenic. They have circular, open faces and wide, round, expressive eyes.  Known to be gentle, sweet felines, Persians need to feel secure and comfortable. They are playful and enjoy attention but are not demanding cats. Persians make wonderful pets.

Exotic

Persians consistently top the list of popular cat breeds. For people who are interested in the attributes of Persian cats but don’t have the time to groom that long, luscious hair, the Exotic is a perfect choice. Exotics are bred to meet the Persian standard in every way except for their fur; the Exotic’s coat is dense, plush and short. Otherwise, their personality and temperament are much like the loveable Persians.

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Special Achiever: Russ Fox and His Schutzhund Dog Artus

By Linda Cole

The word Schutzhund is German and means “protection dog.” Schutzhund is a very demanding canine sport for working dogs, to test their physical and mental abilities in a competition that measures tracking, obedience and protection. Although any dog breed can compete, the sport was developed for the German Shepherd as a way of showing off the dog’s intelligence, willingness to work, endurance, body structure, tracking ability, courage and ability to follow commands. It’s a sport that tests the dog and his handler. CANIDAE is proud to sponsor Russ Fox and his dog Artus who qualified for a spot on this year’s Team Canada and recently returned from the World Championships held in Kiev, Ukraine. I had a chance to talk with him about this exciting sport.

Russ and Artus live in Ontario, Canada. Russ is the K9 trainer for a large municipal police service outside of Toronto. He works with 12 service dogs which has helped him develop as a handler and trainer for his own sporting dogs. “Every dog is different in how he/she reacts to training. Where some dogs react well to food or toys in training, others will work for genuine praise from its handler.”

Russ was drawn to the sport of Schutzhund because of the precision needed in training a dog in all aspects of the sport in tracking, obedience and protection, and he wanted to learn how to develop that in his working dogs. “When selecting a sport dog, we look for many qualities, similar to selecting a police dog. We evaluate the dog’s various drives – food, toy, fight and play – all of these and more helps us train the dog to excel in the sport. We want a well-balanced dog that is a confident social animal with high drives and heart to do the work.”

Russ prefers to feed Artus CANIDAE All Life Stages formula dog food. “Schutzhund is a very demanding sport on the dogs both physically and mentally. Like any athlete, nutrition plays a critical role for these dogs to succeed. With CANIDAE, I know my dog is getting quality nutrition so that I will get the best performance from him. All Life Stages has met the demands that Artus goes through during training. I have also used the pureSEA Salmon formula for another sport dog, and she is doing extremely well on it.”

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Heroic Cats

By Julia Williams

Scarlett

A few weeks ago, I watched the Hero Dog Awards on television. It was fun to see some of the dogs I know through Facebook get honored for their heroic acts. It was also great to learn about other hero dogs I wasn’t aware of. This got me thinking – what about heroic felines? Why isn’t there a Hero Cat Awards show? Now, I know some of you probably think the term Hero Cat is an oxymoron. In truth, cats generally aren’t the first species that comes to mind when we think of pets that perform heroic deeds, save lives or put themselves in danger to help someone. Most cats have a “Me First” mentality, and some even have a “Me Only” mindset…or at least it seems that way when they want something. Ha! I did a little digging, however, and discovered a few cats that deserve to be lauded for their heroism.

Leroy 

This house cat from North Carolina is now known as the “Hero Cat of Maggie Valley” and was featured on both the Animal Planet network and TLC’s Must Love Cats show. Leroy is credited with helping his owner, Bryan Hickman, save the lives of several neighbors from a devastating fire. Leroy’s incessant loud meowing woke Bryan up early one morning. Bryan went downstairs to let the cat out the front door, but Leroy ran to the back door instead and pawed at it. When Bryan opened the door he saw huge flames billowing from the townhouse next door, and ran to awaken the occupants. The building was destroyed, but no one was injured thanks to Leroy!

KittyBaby 

The book Angel Cats: Divine Messengers of Comfort tells the story of a cat named KittyBaby who lived with Nancy Strand in a cabin in Alaska’s Tongass National Forest. After bears started passing through her neighborhood, KittyBaby took on the role of protector, said Nancy. “One night as I prepared to go outside, KittyBaby firmly pushed me away from the door. He pressed hard against my leg, redirecting me to another area. The next morning I discovered that a marauding bear had ransacked our garbage can. On numerous other occasions, when KittyBaby sensed a bear nearby, he would stand between me and the cat flap on the door and growl as if he were a big dog!”

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How to Socialize Puppies and Adult Dogs

By Linda Cole

All puppies need to be socialized, and if you’ve adopted a dog from a shelter or bought an older dog, you may need to spend time socializing him, too. Sometimes a dog gets into a fight with another dog at a dog park or at a friend’s house, and it leaves him wary of other dogs. A new person or pet in the home can cause a dog to need socializing again also. It’s important to make sure your dog or puppy is well socialized with people, new things in his environment, and other pets in the home.

Socializing a Puppy

Just like kids, a puppy’s early life can set the stage for how he behaves and his ability to accept new things in his life. The first 8 – 20 weeks are extremely important for your pup’s development, and that’s the best age to begin socializing a puppy. It’s up to his owner to make sure he’s exposed to new things on a regular basis so he has an opportunity to learn what’s expected from him and how to act when confronted with something new.

He needs to be exposed to people, other pets in the home, other dogs and new places, sounds, sights and smells. He needs to experience things he’ll have to deal with in his life. And he needs to be able to learn in a positive way so he’s not apprehensive when something new comes his way later on in his life. Because a puppy hasn’t received all of his vaccinations yet, check with your vet for advice on when you can expose your pup to other dogs and people outside the home. Your pup is also capable of learning basic commands at an early age, which helps him learn who’s in charge.

Introduce your pup to new people and situations during this period. You will want him to meet men, women, older people, children and other pets. Expose him to people riding bikes, skateboards, men with beards, people in uniforms, and women/men with short and long hair. Dogs do notice the differences in people, and the more your pup has a chance to meet different people, the more confident and calm he’ll be.

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Training an Older Dog

By Langley Cornwell

Yes, you can teach an old dog new tricks! You can also teach them new behaviors. While the approach is different than training a puppy, an adult dog is entirely capable of learning.

If you’re wondering why you would need to train an adult dog, consider these scenarios:

• You’ve recently adopted an older dog from an animal shelter or rescue facility and – while sweet – the dog doesn’t know basic commands.

• You want to teach your longtime companion new activities to keep him active; activities like agility, hunting, or obedience trials.

• Your dog has developed a few bad habits or is getting petulant and snippy.

• You recently retired and plan to start traveling with your dog.

There is a solution to all of these situations as long as you stay patient and approach the task knowledgeably.

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