Monthly Archives: December 2012

City or Country Life…Is One Healthier for Dogs?

By Linda Cole

What dog wouldn’t love to live in the country where there’s wide open spaces to explore, plenty of room to run, critters to chase and ponds to cool off in? We have a tendency to think of city life as more cramped, but there are good things and bad things about living in the city or country. Whether one or the other is a healthier lifestyle for a dog depends more on his owner than where he lives.

When I was a kid, my family lived in the country. My dog Trixie and I explored every country mile we could find. Well, at least the ones that were within the distance I was allowed from home on my own. Trixie, being a farm dog, would roam on her own at times, and brought back some interesting “trophies” from her travels around the farm. One time she trotted up to show off the snake she’d just caught. Thankfully, it was just a garter snake.

As far as I was concerned, life on the farm was perfect, but there were hazards we had to contend with. There was always a chance of meeting wild animals, especially around sunset or sunrise, and there were stray nails that I always seemed to find – with my foot. I had to look out for puddles of oil or antifreeze that leaked out from vehicles, things Trixie found to eat that she shouldn’t, or getting scratched by a rusty wire sticking out, just to name a few dangers. However, when we moved into town, some of the same hazards were also present, especially my ability to find stray nails the hard way.

According to veterinarian and founder of Peachtree Hills Animal Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia, Dr. Duffy Jones, country life gives dogs a higher risk of getting injured. More farm dogs are allowed to roam unsupervised which means they can encounter more falls, run ins with wild animals, being hit by a car or some other type of farm equipment, or being infected with worms from eating things they shouldn’t. Ticks are also a bigger concern for dogs living in the country. Deer ticks are a danger to us as well as our pets, and wherever you find deer, there is an increased chance of finding a deer tick on your dog.

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DIY Dog-Themed Christmas Tree Ornaments

By Tamara McRill

I’m not sure if it’s the mad love for my dogs or all those hours spent on Pinterest, but I have decided my boys deserve their own little Christmas tree. Decorated completely in – you guessed it – handmade dog-themed ornaments. From photos to paw-tastic ribbons, there are so many options to choose from and each one can be customized to fit in with my current holiday decor. Since I am in full-on craft mode, I decided to make the ornaments myself. Figuring that my fellow dog lovers might also want in on the fun, I’m sharing some of the easier ornaments I’ll be making and others under consideration. Enjoy!

Frame Ornaments

This one is easiest if you already have some photo frame ornaments sitting around. Then all you have to do is print out some pictures of your pets and put them in the frames. To match your current decorations and make the look more cohesive, also frame other graphic images of dogs, bones and paw prints. You can find these in your Christmas colors online, or buy some dog-themed wrapping paper and cut out the details you like best.

I don’t have any frame ornaments on hand, so I am turning to my trusty glue gun and silver spray paint. Here are the steps:

Supplies: Cardboard, scissors, exacto knife, glue gun, glue sticks, silver spray paint, ribbon and your image.

1. With scissors and an exacto knife, cut out ornate frames in different shapes from cardboard.

2. Poke a small hole at the top, wide enough to string ribbon through.

2. Spray paint them and allow to dry.

3. Glue the edges of your image to cardboard backing.

4. Glue the backing to your photo frame.

5. String a ribbon through the top hole and tie the loose ends in a knot.

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Cat Chat: Text Abbreviations for Tech-Savvy Felines

By Julia Williams

The advent of computers and cell phones spawned a new way of communicating for many people. Words and phrases became abbreviated to save time while typing in chat rooms, online forums, mobile text messages and on Facebook. Chat abbreviations have become so commonplace that most of us know what LOL, BRB, TMI, ETA, IDK, OMG and BFF mean. However, I saw a text abbreviation recently that stumped me, so I did what I always do nowadays when I need information – I googled it. Paydirt! I not only found the one that had baffled me, but a comprehensive A to Z list that blew me away. Who knew there were thousands of text abbreviations just waiting to make our lives easier by shaving two seconds off our typing time? Wut?

Naturally, that got me to thinking about texting abbreviations cats would use in their everyday communications with other cats (and perhaps even a stray human or two). Never mind the lack of opposable thumbs. Plenty of cat crazy people are willing to buy into the fantasy that felines are capable of typing. Why wouldn’t cats want to save precious time by using text abbreviations? After all, that leaves more time for what is really important to kittehs – such as, eatin’ a big bowl of FELIDAE cat food, then settling down for a long nap as only a cat can do.

As responsible pet owners, we should be keeping tabs on Tabby while she’s online and especially when she’s texting that Tomcat hotty who has a reputation for wooing every ladycat within hissing distance. To make it easy for you, I spied on my own wily felines and compiled a list of all the texting lingo that tech-savvy cats use.

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Are Pets Part of Your Holiday Traditions?

By Langley Cornwell

Several years ago, Julia wrote a thoughtful article about Including Family Pets in Your Holiday Plans. With the season upon us, I thought it would be interesting to take a poll to see if my friends included pets in their holiday traditions. I’m happy to report there are no “Scroogely Curmudgeons” among my friends!

Many people hang stockings for their pets and give them special presents. In fact, lots of my friends acted surprised that I even asked; I received answers like absolutely and of course and even a few why yes, don’t you?

Sherrie’s pets receive presents and get extra treats. Christina’s dogs get presents – toys, cookies, clothing, the works – and they let their dogs open gifts before the people do. Sharon’s dogs have stockings and get special gifts and doggie treats. Jo says: “Of course our furbabies get some Christmas dinner and they have stockings with toys and treats. Don’t all pets?”

Brandi’s dog and birds have stockings hung right alongside the family’s, and theirs are always filled, just like everyone else’s. Rissa’s dog has a stocking and gets gifts; he loves getting all his new toys on Christmas morning! Luchrisa says her pets help her and her husband open their packages and then have a great time playing in the wrapping paper.

Alina hangs tiny stockings filled with a few treats for their cats. Her kids think it is the funniest thing ever. Michelle always makes sure to buy a little stocking for each of her animals and puts them up on the fireplace with treats in them. Scott’s pets all get their own stocking on the fireplace filled with goodies. His family thinks making the stocking with their pet’s names in glitter is part of the fun.

I got a lot of answers that involved dressing up or otherwise adorning pets for the season. Tania’s greyhound is going to get a red scarf-type collar with bells this year. And she always paints her Diva dog’s toenails in Christmas colors. Starr’s dogs wear Santa or elves hats and have their own stockings filled with CANIDAE treats. Deborah’s “little girls” each have her own Christmas sweater; one says “Naughty” and the other says “Nice.” David dresses up his dog like Santa, but he says the dog acts more like a devil.

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Ethos Pet Nutrition – Our Advanced Research and Development Center and Manufacturing Facility

All of us at CANIDAE are proud to share with you a milestone event. This November every CANIDAE and Ethos team member came together in Brownwood, Texas for a company tour of our recently finished facility.

This new facility — named Ethos Pet Nutrition — is our advanced research and development center as well as our pet food manufacturing facility.

Here at CANIDAE Pet Foods and Ethos Pet Nutrition we are committed to all of your families enjoying long, happy and healthy lives together. And that is why the foundation of the CANIDAE culture will always be to provide the best in pet and equine foods and treats so that your pets can enjoy A Healthier Today for a Longer Tomorrow™.

Please enjoy these pictures of our team standing in front of our facility and a few photographs from inside our research and development center and manufacturing facility. To see more, visit EthosPet.com

Automation –
Total process and formulation monitoring throughout the facility allows for quality control during the entire manufacturing cycle… From the delivery of ingredients, to the cooking, adding of nutrients, extrusion, the addition of probiotics and fats, last stage finishing and bagging – the final pet or equine product being manufactured is exactly what was intended.

Extrusion –
Once our natural ingredients have been carefully blended to our specific formula, they are conveyed into the extruder.  Here the ingredients are carefully cooked through the process of controlled steam and pressure.  This process of both art and science also changes the texture of the food mixture so as to allow it to be formed into the desired kibble size.  The result – a superior tasting kibble that is both more nutritious and more highly digestible.

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The personal opinions and/or use of trade, corporate or brand names, is for information and convenience only. Such use does not constitute an endorsement by CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods of any product or service. Opinions are those of the individual authors and not necessarily of CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods.

Be a Secret Santa for a Needy Pet this Christmas

By Tamara McRill

In my house, we’re big believers that the joy of the holidays isn’t just reserved for the special people in our lives. We like to extend the love and gift giving to their pets and even have friends that do the same for ours. But this year I’ve been thinking about those pets that don’t have the benefit of a loving circle of friends or our friends who may not be able to afford gifts for the pets they adore. Instead of feeling sad about this, I’ve decided to start a new holiday tradition. This Christmas we are going to become Secret Santas to some less fortunate pets in our community, and you can too!

Here are a few considerations and tips you can use to help out needy pets this holiday season:

Being a Secret Santa to Pets You Know

We’re no strangers to the sleuthing it takes to give the perfect gifts to needy pets that we know. It’s usually not hard to get fellow pet lovers to open up about their fur babies. Some details you may want to ask (or fish for depending on the person’s pride):

- What types of toys does your pet like to play with?
- Which toys aren’t a match for his jaws or personality?
- Is your pet supervised with toys?
- What kind of treats does your pet like best?
- Is there anything your pet needs or could use replacing?
- Does your pet have any phobias?

These questions are important, because you don’t want your being a Secret Santa to turn into a trip to the vet for the pet. The power of a dog’s jaws and how often they tear things up are crucial to the type of toys and even food dishes you consider giving as presents. Some dogs – like my chocolate lab Wuppy – have powerful chompers that destroy most dog toys. Even most of the super durable kinds. Most toys pose a choking hazard for my dog if they aren’t taken away as soon as he goes out of play mode and into destruction mode. Other dogs – and most cats – are kinder to their toys and don’t require that high level of supervision.

Finding out a pet’s phobias may seem like a strange thing to ask regarding a Christmas present, but there are actually lots of pets out there who have a strong aversion to common things. I’ve had a wonderful, but picky, white cat who wouldn’t sit on anything not – you guessed it – white. So a different color pet bed would have been a waste on her. I’ve also known dogs who were afraid of balls!

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