Monthly Archives: February 2013

Dog Breed Profile: Dogue de Bordeaux

By Lisa Mason

The Dogue de Bordeaux, also called the Bordeaux Bulldog and French Mastiff, is a very amazing dog. It’s not known exactly how this breed first originated, but some speculate they were linked to breeds like the Bulldog, Tibetan Mastiff and Bullmastiff. What is known for sure is that the Dogue de Bordeaux is a smart breed that has protected his “master” for many years. This Dogue de Bordeaux profile will help you understand the breed better so you can determine if he’s suited for your family. Responsible pet ownership means learning all you can about your pet so that you can provide the best care possible.

Stature

The Bordeaux Bulldog is a muscular dog with a gigantic, wrinkled head and a short, stocky body. These features make this French breed a very powerful and intimating dog. They have a medium to short but wide muzzle that averages about a third the length of their head. The nose is big and the upper lip hangs down in thick wrinkles over their lower jaws.

The dog has a loose fold of skin that hangs from his neck, and light or dark brown eyes that are set far apart. He has small ears compared to the rest of his body. The base of his tail is broad but tapers off at the end. He has muscular legs, a broad chest and loose skin.

The adult Dogue de Bordeaux usually weighs between 120 to 150 pounds and stands up to 30 inches high. Their coat varies from light to dark shades of brown and sometimes they’ll have a reddish color mixed in. Around the eyes, nose and lips are usually a darker shade of brown or red, and some dogs will have white marks on the toes and chest area.

Read More »

EmailGoogle GmailBlogger PostTwitterFacebookGoogle+Share

Good TV Shows for Dogs

By Bear, Canine Guest Blogger

Howdy! Well, it’s been a while since I’ve been allowed to write a post here, you know my mommy always wants to say things her way. Besides I’ve been a little busy lately… I’ve become a couch potato!

When Mom has to leave the house she always leaves the TV on for me so I don’t, as she says, destroy things. I really don’t, but when I hear things outside and want to see, I sometimes have to climb up on her desk or on the table near the window. Okay, sometimes I might put my paws on the windowsill and maybe the curtains get pulled down if there’s a cat or another dog in my yard. Hey, I’m just letting them know they are trespassing!

Oh yeah, back to the story… so, she leaves the TV on and turns it up to drown out other sounds, then she leaves. I don’t know why this woman thinks an intelligent dog like me is going to be interested in children’s cartoons; it’s obvious she hasn’t a clue about a doggie brain. I have figured out how to find the shows I want to watch, and let me tell you there is much better programming on for pets than cartoons!

Did you know there are entire channels dedicated to food shows? That’s right; I can curl up on the sofa and watch people cook all sorts of yummy foods. My favorite is Diners, Drive-in’s and Dives with that spiky haired Guy Fieri – boy, he finds all the best food!

When I’ve drooled a nice puddle and am tired of wishing I could eat what’s on the television, I move to the other end of the sofa and choose another show. There are lots of shows on Animal Planet that are great fun for a dog to watch.

Read More »

Can You Give Your Pet the Flu?

By Linda Cole

No one looks forward to the flu. The chills, aches and pains can send even the hardiest person to bed for a few days. We try to do what we can to avoid the flu, but when symptoms appear, we know people around us are at risk of catching what we have. It was thought at one time that pets in the home couldn’t be infected, but new research is raising a red flag that says it is possible to pass the flu bug to our pets.

So how do you know if you’re dealing with a cold or the flu? After all, they have common symptoms. Colds enter the body via the nose and primarily affect us above the neck with runny nose, sneezing, congestion and sore throat. Some people might have an achy feeling, with a low grade temperature. You know you’re coming down with a cold because symptoms develop over a period of a couple of days. The flu hits you like a brick. One minute you’re fine and the next you’re wrestling with muscle aches, chills, fever, fatigue and tightness in your chest, all of which are likely to send you to bed. Other symptoms can include a running nose or cough, but not as severe as with a cold.

The common belief for years was that our pets couldn’t catch the flu from their owner, but new research has challenged this with studies that show it is possible. When an infectious disease moves from animals to humans, it’s called zoonosis. Reverse zoonosis happens when humans infect animals. In 2009, the H1N1 flu virus, also known as the swine flu, had the first ever recorded case of a human transmitting the flu to her two cats. The woman recovered, but her cats died. Since then, 11 cats, one dog and a handful of ferrets have been infected with the flu after having contact with a sick human.

Read More »

4 Year Blogiversary Bash and a Giveaway!

By Julia Williams

Bow wow WOW! It’s been four years since CANIDAE began the Responsible Pet Ownership blog, and what a ride it’s been. Let’s pop a cork and have a PAWTY!

I’ve been Editor of the RPO blog for nearly all of that time, and I’ve watched it grow and evolve to become something better than I ever imagined. Blogging has been around for awhile now, but in many ways is still in its infancy, and there’s so much yet to discover.

I can’t wait to see what the next four years has in store for this blog, as well as for all of the other pet blogs and bloggers I’ve come to know and love. Social media is a unique sign of the times; unless you have a fairly new dictionary, you won’t find the terms “blog” and “blogging” in there. And yet, blogs have become a part of daily life for many of us. Whether we read blogs, write blogs or do some of both, it’s hard to imagine them not being there.

CANIDAE began this blog with a few simple but heartfelt goals – to connect with customers, make new friends, share interesting and fun stories, and impart knowledge to help people be the best “pet parents” they can be.

Four years and nearly 2,000 posts later, I’m happy to say these goals have all been met, and so much more. Responsible pet ownership is at the heart of everything this blog stands for and strives to accomplish. It’s the cornerstone of the CANIDAE brand as well as the philosophy of all who work for the company.

Read More »

Famous Cat Actors

By Langley Cornwell

There are plenty of famous animated cats in cartoons, on television and in the movies. We’re probably all familiar with the likes of Sylvester, Felix, Tigger, Oscar, Tom and Garfield, but what about live cat actors? It seems like the live dog actors get all the press. Even here, I recently wrote about Eddie, the dog from Frasier, and Toto but I’ve never given any space to live cat actors.

Granted, anybody that has ever shared their life with a cat knows it’s not easy to teach a cat to perform a task on command. For that reason, there are not as many famous cat actors to write about. Still, our feline thespians should get the recognition they deserve, so here is a little background on some famous cat actors.

Vito Vincent

A congenial orange tabby named Vito Vincent has achieved a level of fame and a reputation for being incredibly calm, even amidst the hustle and bustle of film and television sets. So far, Vito has gained recognition by being on high profile TV shows that film in New York, like 30 Rock and The Colbert Report. His owner and manager believes that Vito will get even bigger and better gigs in Hollywood, so they recently moved from the Big Apple to the West Coast so Vito could let his star shine bright.

Milo

In The Adventures of Milo & Otis, the cat actor and the dog actor got equal screen time. Oh well, at least the cat got top billing. In fact, The Adventures of Milo & Otis is a remake of a Japanese movie called Koneko Monogatari, which means A Kitten’s Story. Milo is an orange tabby kitten and her canine companion is a pug named Otis. Dudley Moore provides the voices of both characters and all of the actors are animals; no humans show up in this film. The movie reportedly took four years to complete due to the complexities of working strictly with animal actors – I wonder how many truckloads of training treats like CANIDAE TidNips and Snap-Bits were used to get the animals to do what they were supposed to?

Read More »

How the Karelian Bear Dog is Saving Wildlife

Mishka meets an abandoned bear cub

By Linda Cole

Humans have raised, bred and trained dogs to perform specific jobs for centuries. Canines have been used to guard flocks, homes and families, and to perform tricks to amuse us. There are even wildlife detection dogs. When we use the talents of dogs, it not only makes a job we have to do easier, it can also be the most effective way of taking care of a problem. A biologist working for the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife decided to combat a bear problem by utilizing one of the most efficient solutions to wandering bears – the Karelian Bear Dog. With the help of this brave dog breed, wildlife is being saved, and people are better protected.

The Karelian Bear Dog (KBD) is a rare and ancient breed native to Finland. They were bred to hunt elk, lynx, cougar, deer, moose, boar and bear. This fearless dog is ready to fiercely fight to the death to protect his owner, if necessary. This isn’t a breed that likes to share his human with other dogs, and is dog aggressive. Nor is this a breed for someone who doesn’t know how to properly train and control a powerful dog.

Mishka is ready to go to work!

The Karelian Bear Dog is a natural hunter with a high prey drive, picking up both air and ground scents. A medium sized dog, standing 19 to 23 inches and weighing 40 to 65 pounds, the KBD is independent, extremely loyal, tough and an intelligent guard dog. The Karelian Bear Dog has no problem standing up to large prey, and he will not back down.

Anytime wildlife officials can find nonlethal methods to deal with problem predators getting too close to where humans live, it’s a good thing for the environment, the animals and people. The KBD is capable of dealing with a Grizzly bear, but Washington State primary uses the dogs to control black bear. A pilot program in 2007 was set up with one dog, Mishka, and his handler, WDFW Officer Bruce Richards. It didn’t take long for both of them to prove their worth by effectively dealing with complaints about problem bears.

Read More »