Yearly Archives: 2014

A Dog’s New Year’s Resolutions

By Neela Bear Darroch, Canine Guest Blogger

I have my own take on this New Year’s resolution stuff I have been hearing about this week. So I, Neela Bear, resolve to do the following things to the best of my ability this coming year.

I resolve to eat more CANIDAE treats whenever I can find them, no matter where they are hidden or put out of my reach. I resolve to always be a member of the Clean Plate Club when meal time comes around or when I sneak some other food that was left within my reach on the kitchen counter and was calling to me. I resolve to eat every drop of food that falls on the floor and help keep the floor clean.

I resolve to play more with Mommy as much as I can, whenever I can, even in the middle of the night when it is dark in the room, she is fast asleep, and I get what she calls a “bee up my behind” and she gets kind of grumpy with me.

I resolve to try and realize I am not 6 pounds, but 60 pounds, and I can’t do what I did when I was a tiny puppy, even if I still feel like one inside.

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When “Cat People” Consider Life with a Dog

By Langley Cornwell

Do you believe some people are “cat people” and some are “dog people?” I used to think that was true, and considered myself a staunch dog person. Granted, I love all animals, but preferred to share my life with those of the canine persuasion. All of that abruptly changed when my husband and I were at an animal shelter to get a new dog. As we were filling out the final paperwork, we started chatting with the shelter staff. Everything was settled and we began making our way to the door with our new pup when one of the staff members raced up with a tiny little kitten. She thrust the kitten into my husband’s face and said, “This is my special little guy and I want to make sure he has the perfect home. What about it?”

“What about what?” I said in my best dog-only-person voice.

“He’s a cutie” my husband the cat lover said (although I’m not sure he used the word cutie, and he’d probably deny it). “He looks just like my favorite cat Rudy used to look,” he continued, and looked me square in the eyes. That look let me know it was my decision but he really wanted the kitten to come home with us. The shelter staff noticed my hesitation and ganged up on me. Now what’s a girl going to do? I caved to the peer pressure and agreed. So we went to the shelter for a dog and came home with a cat and a dog.

That’s how I made the switch. But don’t misunderstand my use of the word switch.  I didn’t switch from being a “dog person” to being a “cat person.” No, I switched from being a “dog only” person to being a “dog and cat” person.

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Easy-to-Make Warm Winter Coat for Your Dog

By Linda Cole

Not all dogs need a winter coat. Their natural one does a fine job, as long as it’s clean and free of mats and tangles. However, some canines don’t have an adequate coat that will keep them warm, and they may need a winter coat. If you notice your dog shivering during the winter months, it’s a sign he is cold and could use a coat. You can find a large selection of dog coats at pet stores, but it’s easy to make your own.

You will need:

● Quilted material (100% cotton face and back and polyester fill) for outer shell, and fleece material for inner shell. It’s recommended to wash the quilted material before using because it will shrink a little. Bast around the edges before washing, to keep it from unraveling. You could also cut the quilted material about an inch wider than the fleece to adjust for any shrinkage and not prewash the material.

Quilted material will cost around $12.50 per yard depending on pattern, and fleece will run from $3.00-$12.00 per yard depending on where you buy your material. For small dogs like Yorkshire Terriers and toy breeds, half a yard of each material is all you need. For most sizes of dogs, one yard of each material should be more than enough, unless your pet is really big. You need enough material to make the body of the coat, a collar, and a belly strap.
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Merry Christmas from CANIDAE and the RPO Blog

We know everyone is very busy today with opening gifts, cooking, feasting and spending time with your family, so we won’t keep you. We just wanted to take a moment to say Merry Christmas!

All of us here at the Responsible Pet Ownership Blog and CANIDAE  would like to extend our warmest wishes to you and your pets. We hope your holiday is filled with joy, love, laughter and happiness, and that the doggie tails are a-wagging and the kitty motors are purring.

We wanted to share a few festive photos of our adorable pets with you. We hope you enjoy them!

How a Child Celebrates Christmas with Her Dog (poem)

By Laurie Darroch

Christmas is a season of family gatherings and celebrations that include the dogs and cats in your home. From a dog’s point of view, all the new smells, sights and sounds can be just as exciting as they are for any child or adult.

This poem is loosely based on experiences with my own daughter and our very loved dog. Kira was a big black lab/Dalmatian/mastiff mix. She and my daughter reveled in everything about the whole holiday season as much as I did. Christmas morning, the two of them would race to my door and anxiously wait for me to get up.

On the floor in front of the tree, all the filled stockings were laid out carefully. Kira knew which one was hers; every year she stood with her nose dug into her big stocking and her behind in the air while she wagged her tail furiously. She even knew how to unwrap her own gifts.

Dogs sense the excitement and the mood of Christmas celebrations and react to what is going on around them. If given the chance, they will enjoy the holidays too, in their own way.

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Common Cat Injuries, and What to Do About Them

By Langley Cornwell

There is a lot of information circulating about acute and chronic feline illnesses, which is helpful when you need details about a particular situation or condition. However, there are a handful of common injuries that befall cats on a fairly regular basis, and some of these injuries can be treated at home. A responsible pet owner would do well to have a standard working knowledge of common cat health issues and know what steps to take to help their feline friend. In other words, it’s important to know when you need to make a mad dash to the emergency veterinary clinic versus when you can calmly assess the problem and either treat it yourself or make a convenient appointment with your regular veterinarian.

Here are some of the most common cat injuries.

Animal Bites and Puncture Wounds

Among the most common injuries with cats are puncture/bite wounds, usually the result of a cat fight. With a bite wound or a puncture wound from a sharp, pointed object, you must clean the area thoroughly and try to flush out the wound so you can inspect it. A note of caution: be careful when inspecting your cat’s injury; a wounded animal can be unpredictable and aggressive.

If the wound looks superficial, after cleaning the area apply an antibiotic ointment and keep a close watch on it for signs of infection. Continue to keep the area clean and dressed with the ointment as it heals. Deeper wounds may require stitches and oral antibiotics, so it’s best to head to the veterinarian’s office. Also, cat-on-cat fights can be especially harmful because the bite from another cat can easily abscess. If you know that the puncture wound is a cat bite, go see your veterinarian. A snake bite is an entirely different thing; go straight to the nearest animal hospital.

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