Category Archives: basic commands

At What Age Should You Begin Puppy Training?

By Linda Cole

It’s easy to put off starting a training program for a new pup until after he’s older. An eight week old puppy may still be a “baby,” but he’s already learned a lot from his mom and siblings. His education needs to continue in his new home as soon as he gets there. Therefore, the best age to begin puppy training is the minute you get him home.

Puppies adjust quickly to new surroundings. Of course, he’ll have a period of missing his siblings and mom. You can carry the scent of his old life with you to his new home by taking a baby blanket or towel with you when you pick him up. Rub it on his mom and siblings and let them play on it. When you arrive home, place it where you want him to sleep so he has familiar smells around him. Helping him get through his first few nights will be your first training session.

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How to Teach an Excited Dog to Calm Down

By Linda Cole

Some dogs can get so worked up when it’s time for a walk or a romp in the backyard they nearly knock you over on the way to the door. Frenzied barking and jumping is the sign of a hyper, out-of-control dog who could become aggressive if they remain in that state of mind and meet another dog or person once outside. Calming them down before they go out is the best thing to do – but how do you teach a dog to stay calm? Read on.

An overly excited dog isn’t focusing on you. If you are trying to get them outside and they are jumping, barking and running away from you, they are controlling the situation. Teach a dog to stay calm with basic commands and get him to focus on you.

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Train Your Dog According to Their Personality

By Linda Cole

Dogs are not created equal when it comes to training. Some learn faster than others, and some just can’t seem to get what you’re trying to teach. All dogs can be taught basic commands as long as you’re willing to invest the time and energy to stay committed. However, dogs are individuals and like kids, they learn at their own pace. Knowing your dog’s personality can help you devise a training schedule that works best for them.

Dog training isn’t high on some people’s priority list. I know many dog owners who have never spent one minute training their dogs to sit, stay, walk on a leash or any other basic commands. They feel that as long as their dog will come to them most of the time when called, that’s all the training they need. Animal shelters are full of untrained dogs who have been surrendered by their owners because the dog developed behavioral problems they had no idea how to correct. Lack of training to correct behavioral problems is one reason many people give up their dogs.

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The Three Types of Dog Intelligence

By Linda Cole

Most dog owners have some idea how smart their dog is. Every dog can learn basic commands as long as we make the commitment to teach them. Most dogs also know at least one trick you can show off to guests. However, some dogs take a little longer to learn, which can try an owner’s patience. And sometimes, a dog just doesn’t seem to get what an owner is trying to teach. Scientists and animal behaviorists have been studying dogs for many years, and have come up with three types of dog intelligence. One type of learning is a specific kind each dog breed has that helps them learn according to who they are and what their breed characteristics are.

Dog intelligence is defined as the ability to learn, think and problem solve. It’s easy to come up with a list of the smartest dogs, but in order to determine a dog’s intelligence, how quickly they learn is just one part of the equation. A specific breed’s characteristics and what they were bred to do plays a large role in their intelligence, and understanding this makes training a dog easier. Intelligence shouldn’t be confused with stubbornness though, and hard-to-train dogs need a consistent owner with plenty of patience and understanding along with a firm, yet gentle hand.

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Dog Training with Consistency and Patience

By Linda Cole

Most of us are not professional dog trainers, but our canine companions still need basic training to help keep them safe. As long as you stay consistent and patient with your dog, he will learn what you’re trying to teach him. As responsible pet owners, we understand why a dog needs to learn basic commands like sit, stay, down and no. And of course, every dog should know to come as soon as they’re called. The hard part, especially with a more head strong dog, is how to do it without a professional dog trainer. If you don’t have access to one or can’t afford a professional trainer, don’t worry about it. Get yourself lots of CANIDAE dog treats and a good leash, and stay calm. Training your dog might take a little longer when you aren’t sure what you’re doing, but rest assured you can do it.

Understand your dog’s breed characteristics to help you know what you can expect from him, even if you have a mixed breed. Some dogs learn faster, but all dogs are capable of learning basic commands as long as you’re willing to commit to dog training. Some breeds have a stubborn streak and others are laid back and eager to please. Some dogs respond well with only praise and some need more incentive with a tasty treat. Either way works, but make sure to include lots of praise with or without treats.

Exercise your dog before starting. Begin with a walk or some play time, just enough to get rid of pent up energy so he’s ready to concentrate on learning. It helps him focus on your commands once you begin training your dog. A walk is also the perfect time to work on heel and sit.

Make dog training a game, and keep it simple. When you’re ready to train your dog, the more fun he has learning, the more willing he’ll be to learn. Don’t get stressed out if he’s not paying attention, and never hit him or yell at him. You don’t want to give your dog negative feelings. An anxious dog can act out if he’s frustrated and doesn’t understand what he’s doing wrong or why you’re yelling at him. Keep it fun so he’ll look forward to the next dog training session.

Stay calm, and be patient. You can’t force a dog to learn. You may be ready to train your dog, but he may not be ready. It doesn’t mean “now” isn’t the right time. He just may need a little encouragement to get into the game. Staying calm will transfer to your dog. He understands your moods by your body language and tone of voice.

Stay consistent with your commands. If you’re teaching your dog to sit, use the same command every time. Don’t confuse him by using different words for the same command and expect him to learn each one. “Sit” should be sit or sit down, but not both.

It’s not necessary to use your dog’s name before each command. He knows you’re speaking to him. If you’re training more than one dog, don’t try to train them together. It’s much easier when you don’t have to divide your attention, and they won’t feel like they have to compete with each other.

Don’t let your dog intimidate you. When you’re trying to train your dog and he doesn’t want to have anything to do with learning, don’t give up. Few dogs can resist their favorite treat. To keep your dog from running back to his spot on the couch or racing around the backyard, put him on a leash. You’re now in control of the dog training session. Start with easy commands like sit and lay down. With lots of praise and good treats, he’ll be eager for his next lesson.

Stop when he gets bored. Sooner or later, learning turns into boredom. You don’t have to spend a long time teaching him commands. Once he understands what you want, practice each command every day to reinforce it. When he knows the basics, then you can start teaching him some tricks.

Don’t get mad if he isn’t paying attention. Dog training requires your dog’s full attention. If he isn’t hungry, a treat won’t work. If there are other activities going on around him, it’s hard for him to concentrate if he’d rather be playing or keeping an eye on the neighborhood squirrels. Try again later.

Most dogs learn basic commands quickly. Don’t give up! Dog training isn’t difficult or time consuming, but it does require staying calm, consistent and patient.

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The personal opinions and/or use of trade, corporate or brand names, is for information and convenience only. Such use does not constitute an endorsement by CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods of any product or service. Opinions are those of the individual authors and not necessarily of CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods.

Training Dogs to Respond to a Silent Whistle


By Linda Cole

Whistle training is usually only done by hunters or herders to control their dog while out in the field. But using a silent whistle to give your dog commands has its advantages. I started using a silent dog whistle years ago when I learned that my Siberian Husky was an escape artist. Instead of having to walk the neighborhood yelling, I could simply blow on the whistle and she could hear it better than my voice. Training your dog to respond to a silent dog whistle is just like teaching them to come to you when you call them using a voice command. It’s easy to do, as long as you are consistent, patient and have plenty of treats and praise for your dog.

A silent dog whistle makes little to no sound that humans can hear, but dogs and even cats hear it loud and clear. The only thing we hear is our breath as it goes through the whistle. You may hear a whistle depending on how you have the pitch set. But it isn’t very loud to us because the sound the dog whistle emits is up in the higher range we can’t pick up.

If you have an outside cat you would like to train to come to the dog whistle or would like to train your inside cat to respond when you blow the whistle, the same training techniques used for a dog would be applied. Cats don’t always come when called, but they may surprise you if they think there’s something in it for them, like food. A sharp blast gets their attention almost as good as a can opener, and all cats understand what that sound means.

Depending on where you buy your dog whistle, the price can be anywhere from $1.50 up to $50.00. You don’t need an expensive whistle, and the ones under $10.00 are just fine. You can buy them with or without a lanyard, but I’ve found having a cord attached to the whistle makes it easier to find because you can hang it in a convenient spot and hang it around your neck when using it.

Training your dog to respond to a silent whistle

The first thing you need to do is decide which commands you want your dog to learn. The dog whistle works well for calling your dog if you’re hiking and he’s off leash, if he’s a country dog that’s wandered down to the back forty or if he has become lost. You can use the whistle inside the home as well and train your dog to come, sit or stay by using long and short whistles. There is no wrong way to do it. Start by getting your dog accustomed to the sound of the silent dog whistle. If your dog is out of the room when you blow it and responds to the sound, give him a treat and praise.

Once you have his attention, pick one series of whistles for the command you want him to respond to. For instance, I use two short whistles for “come.” If you want your dog to sit or stay, you will need different whistles for those basic commands. Each time your dog does what the whistle asks, give him a treat and lots of praise.

Using a silent dog whistle is just like using your voice. Be patient and only use the series of whistles meant for each command. When your dog is in the same room with you, it’s best not to use the whistle and a voice command is more appropriate.

If you are blowing the dog whistle and your dog pays no attention to it, adjust the pitch on the whistle and keep testing it until you see your dog’s ears move. That’s an indication he does hear it. It’s very important to keep the whistle tuned to that particular pitch and frequency, because just like the sound of your voice when you speak a command, your dog will learn what that sound means and respond accordingly. Like any training session, make it a game and have plenty of CANIDAE Snap-Biscuit® or Snap-Bits™ treats around to reward him.

One of the worst feelings I ever had was the first time my Husky pulled out of her collar and took off. That was when I began checking into silent dog whistles and started using it around the dogs to get them use to the sound. The only command I’ve taught the dogs is to come when I blow the dog whistle. Hopefully, if one decides to roam, the silent dog whistle can help them find their way home without me yelling and disturbing the neighbors.

Read more articles by Linda Cole

The personal opinions and/or use of trade, corporate or brand names, is for information and convenience only. Such use does not constitute an endorsement by CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods of any product or service. Opinions are those of the individual authors and not necessarily of CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods.