Category Archives: bonding

The Unlikely Animal Friends in the New Android Commercial

By Linda Cole

Every now and then, a commercial comes along that actually gets your attention. A new Android commercial, “Friends Furever,” not only got my attention, it also made me smile. It features 18 different unlikely animal friends, set to the toe tapping tune “Oo-de-lally” from the 1973 Disney animated movie “Robin Hood,” sung by Roger Miller.

The interspecies friendships in this heartwarming commercial show us how simple it is to get along – if we just try. Most of the animals featured were rescued by humans, but found comfort and healing through a special bond with an unlikely animal friend. Here are some of their stories:

Orangutan and Bluetick Hound

After losing his parents, Suryia the orangutan was rescued and sent to an animal sanctuary in Myrtle Beach, SC. He was withdrawn and refused to eat. To cheer him up, caretakers took him on elephant rides to a nearby pond to play. One day, a skinny hound followed them home. He refused to leave and kept finding ways into the sanctuary to be near Suryia. The sanctuary adopted him when an owner couldn’t be found. Normally dogs are afraid of primates, but these two developed an inseparable bond.

Rhino and Sheep

In 2014, staffers from the Hoedspruit Endangered Species Center in South Africa found a baby rhino next to his mother. Poachers had killed the adult rhino for her horn. Knowing the traumatized baby would die if left alone, he was sedated and taken back to the center. The little rhino, named Gertjie by the staff, was scared and apprehensive. To comfort him, a sheep was brought in and became his surrogate mother.

Read More »

EmailGoogle GmailBlogger PostTwitterFacebookGoogle+PinterestShare

Can We Unintentionally Hurt Our Dog’s Spirit?

By Linda Cole

Most dog owners view their pets as important and valued members of their family, and we’d never do something intentionally that would hurt our dog’s spirit. We may not always understand why dogs behave in certain ways, but dogs don’t understand some of the things we do either. How we interact with a dog matters, and sometimes our actions can unintentionally hurt his spirit.

Taking away food or toys to establish leadership

Food aggression and guarding toys can be a problem that may result in an aggressive reaction towards you, another person or pet. Addressing bad behavior by taking away his CANIDAE food or toys while your dog is still eating or playing won’t change his behavior, and can actually make it worse. He doesn’t have any idea why you “stole” his supper or toy. If it’s repeated on a regular basis, from your dog’s point of view he has a good reason why he needs to be on guard. It doesn’t establish you as the leader, and you risk losing your dog’s trust. To him you’re being disrespectful.

There’s no reason why he should object to you being near his food or toys if he sees you as his leader. You have to earn his respect through training, commitment, patience and positive reinforcement. Teaching your dog what you will and won’t allow gives him boundaries. You can unintentionally cause frustration and stress if you constantly remove his food or toys just to show him you can. If your dog shows unwanted behavior you don’t know how to correct, talk to your vet or a certified animal behaviorist. Resource guarding can be corrected without stressing out your pet.

Read More »

Rituals Can Strengthen the Bond with Your Cat

cat rituals trishBy Julia Williams

Recently, a Facebook friend posted a link to an article about cats that really got my goat. It claimed a scientific study had determined that cats hate it when you touch them and only pretend to love humans for the fringe benefits we provide. “While cats may look all fuzzy and adorable on the outside, research shows that they really are the cold, unfeeling monsters the world thinks they are,” the article stated.

It’s not the first time an obviously anti-cat person went on a diatribe about what awful, unloving creatures cats are, and I’m sure it won’t be the last. What I found particularly egregious about this one was the use of “science” to back up the author’s negative feelings about cats.

I told my friend that this was the most ridiculous article I have ever read. It was ridiculous because anyone who loves cats knows that every statement the cat hater made was untrue. We don’t need science to tell us that if we take the time to understand our cats as individuals and find ways to bond with them, that they will – and most certainly do – love us back. My cats Mickey, Rocky and Annabelle are positive proof of that.

Read More »

John and George: The Dog Who Changed My Life

By Langley Cornwell

I take a ridiculous number of pet photographs. Every time one of our pets strikes a new pose or just looks extra adorable, I snap a picture. Most of my animal-loving friends do the same thing, and have a ton of pet photos on their camera phone. When I look at the photos of my pets or photos other people have taken of their pets, it’s a treat to see the strong connection between photographer and pet. Without trying to sound too cheesy, it’s like I see the animal through a lens of love.

That’s probably the first thing that grabbed me when I stumbled upon artist John Dolan’s sketches of George the Dog. Long before I learned about their incredible life together, I responded to the connection that was so evident in the simple black and white portraits John drew of his beloved George. And, like me, it seems that John picks up pen and paper as often as I pick up my camera; he’s created hundreds of pen and ink drawings of George the Dog in a variety of positions and circumstances. It’s heartwarming.

To discover Dolan’s art is one thing, but when you learn more about the back story, it’s quite another. The first time his art and story came to my attention was via an article in the UK publication, the Hackney Citizen. Apparently this exceptionally talented guy has a rocky past that includes multiple jail stays. He eventually ended up living on the streets of London before he was “discovered,” and he attributes all of his success to George the Dog.

Read More »

Tips for Bonding with a New Puppy

By Laurie Darroch

Developing a healthy bond with your new puppy involves more than simply giving it food and a place to sleep. Like any relationship, a good strong bond between a puppy and their person involves continually working on that relationship in productive ways.

Puppies need the kind of focused love and attention you provide any child, to give it a sense of belonging, love and companionship. You and other family members are the source of everything that nurtures, entertains, guides and comforts a puppy. How you provide it is important in establishing a healthy and happy bond with your puppy.

Establishing Rules and Parameters

It’s important to begin establishing rules of behavior from the moment that cute little puppy comes into your home. They will look to you for guidance in everything they do if they know you are the leader of their new pack.

Puppies are individuals with different capabilities. They will learn at their own pace, but with repetition and reward – either verbal or physical – they will learn. Training a puppy is an ongoing process that requires continued reinforcement and consistency. That process is a wonderful way to bond with your puppy and let them know who is in charge. Learning to sit, heel, stay and curb bad behavior does not happen instantly. Puppies and even grown dogs make mistakes and accidents happen, but with patience and positive reinforcement you both will work through that and accomplish the learning goals.

Read More »

Do Pet Owners Form Closer Bonds with Other People?

By Linda Cole

Bonding is something most humans do without thinking about it. As individuals, we each have our own personality, strengths, flaws and preferences. We tend to gravitate towards other people who share our interests, and as the relationship develops, so does bonding. Most pet owners think of their dog or cat as a member of their family and the connection we share with our pets is unique. But does our special bond with a pet help us form closer relationships with other people? According to science, it does.

Beginning some 10,000 years ago, humans and canines formed a unique pact that benefited both species. We know our early ancestors placed great value in their pets because dogs and cats have been found in burial sites with humans, indicating people felt it was important to give their pet a proper burial. Throughout the many decades of animal domestication, the bonds between humans and our furry friends have made us healthier and happier, and helped us cope with life’s surprises. Pets also help us connect with other people because caring for animals gives us a sense of empathy.

Natural disasters and house fires occur every year. We watched with sadness as the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina unfolded. Researchers conducted studies to find out why many New Orleans residents refused to evacuate to safe shelters, and discovered it was because people didn’t want to leave their pets behind. I didn’t know any of these pet owners, but could relate with the decision they had made. Most pet owners are willing to risk their life to save a pet, according to a 2013 Vanity Fair poll that found 81% of dog owners and 71% of cat owners would go back inside their burning home to save their pet.

Read More »