Category Archives: canidae

Can You Use Dog Products on Cats, and Vice Versa?

By Linda Cole

It may not seem like there would be a problem using dog products on cats, or vice versa. If a shampoo or skin medication is safe for dogs, it should be alright to use on cats as well – right? Not always. Some products can be interchangeable, but it depends on the product. It’s important to read labels to make sure it can safely be used on both species.

Flea and Tick Control

If you have both dogs and cats in your home, it’s essential to use only flea control formulated for each species. It might be tempting for people with multiple cats to use a dose of flea control for large dogs and divide it as evenly as possible between their cats. However, that can have life threatening consequences. Never use a flea control made only for dogs on cats. The physiologies of dogs and cats are different, and using flea control made for dogs can be lethal for cats. A feline’s metabolism is more sensitive than a dog’s, and even allowing your cat to have close contact with or groom a dog that has recently been treated with flea control can be harmful for kitties. It’s extremely important to carefully read the label before using. If a flea control is safe for cats, it will say so on the label. If in doubt, don’t use that product on your cat.

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How to Know if Your Dog Has Allergies

By Laurie Darroch

Dogs can have an allergic reaction or ongoing allergies caused by a variety of things including food, fabrics, cleansers, shampoos and detergents, and bites from fleas. The symptoms of dog allergies can vary depending on the cause. It can take some detective work to ferret out the offender that causes the allergic reaction. Sometimes the cause is obvious and other times you may have to use the process of elimination or get the advice of your vet who can help to treat the allergies and their symptoms when they are severe or do not go away.

Allergies can make your dog very uncomfortable and cause a great deal of distress. If you were having difficulty breathing, or itching and scratching all the time, you would react the same way. Your dog can’t tell you what the problem is, so that is when you as their companion have to discover and solve their allergy issues.

An allergic reaction is the body telling itself that something dangerous is present and trying to ward off that offender. Some dogs will have no reaction whatsoever to something that may give another dog a severe reaction. Like us, dogs are individuals and their bodies handle things differently.

Airborne

Some of the same allergens that affect humans can bother your dog as well. If you notice your dog sneezing or they have developed a chronic cough, it’s a good idea to pay attention to what is around them when they are having the worst reactions. It may be ongoing or may be acute and only occur when they are exposed to a specific allergen.  For instance, dogs can be allergic to cigarette smoke the same way humans can. Scents can also set off an allergic reaction. Chemicals we use for cleaning or even perfumes can irritate your dog and make them sneeze or cough.

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What Can Dogs Sense About Us?

By Linda Cole

Because dogs are social animals, it’s not surprising how connected they are with the people they love. Most dogs are more than willing to protect us from any foe, and we rely on their extraordinary sense of smell and hearing in many ways. However, there are some amazing things dogs can sense about us. Just by paying attention, our dogs can figure out what’s on our mind.

Dogs Can Sense Sadness

Research on how dogs interpret our moods suggests that our canine friends may be capable of feeling empathy in their own unique way when it comes to knowing when you’re feeling sad. In a recent study, scientists found that dogs are more apt to approach someone crying in an effort to comfort them regardless of whether it was someone they knew or a stranger. Humming and talking didn’t garner the same behavior from the dogs in the study. They would try to console the crying person by licking their hands or face, and some took toys to the person to try and cheer them up.

Dogs Can Sense Anger

The “guilty look” on a dog’s face when he’s caught misbehaving isn’t what it seems. He’s just reacting to your angry words and body language. To help defuse a situation and calm you down, the guilty look is his way of saying “I don’t know why you’re upset, but I’m being submissive to help you feel better.” Dogs aren’t capable of feeling guilt, which is why it’s wrong to punish them for doing something they see as natural behavior.

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Spring Has Sprung! Let’s Celebrate with a Photo Contest!

By Julia Williams

In my neck of the woods, spring can be a tad fickle. In other words, even though the calendar says it’s officially springtime, the weather may or may not follow suit. In fact, sometimes winter drags on here for what seems like forever.

Thankfully, this year looks pretty good so far (knock on wood) and I am celebrating the arrival of warm(er) weather. CANIDAE is celebrating the season too, with a spring-themed photo contest for all of their customers and fans!

How to Enter

Just grab your camera and be ready to capture your cat or dog doing whatever you think best embodies the spring season. Whether that’s wearing bunny ears, sniffing daffodils, visiting the Easter Bunny, or just exuberantly enjoying the nice spring weather…snap away!

Then share your best spring-themed photo of your cat or dog on the CANIDAE Facebook photo contest page, and you might win 6 months of free CANIDAE natural pet food!

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Why Do Dogs Love Having their Ears Rubbed?

By Langley Cornwell

One of our rescue dogs is skittish and fearful. We are always on the lookout for ways to help this dog relax and take it easy. We’ve done all kinds of behavioral work and tried multiple training techniques. The good news is that he seems to making progress. Even so, there is plenty of work that still needs to be done.

The other evening after he finished eating his favorite grain free dog food – CANIDAE PURE Elements with Lamb – he was lying on the sofa next to me and I began rubbing his ears. He snuggled closer and I began to feel all of the tension slowly leaving his body; it was if someone had stuck a tiny pin in a ball and the air was seeping out gradually. I know all the tricks for putting our cat into this state of relaxed euphoria, but I’d never been able to get this dog to fully let go until that moment. With a big grin on his goofy, loveable face, he fell into a happy trance.

It turns out that rubbing a dog’s ears is a natural sedative, almost like a tranquilizer.

Nerve Centers

The ears of a dog are one of three nerve centers on his body. The other nerve centers Dog-Animated-no-offerare between his toes and the center of his belly; all of these places are extremely sensitive to the touch. The benefit of knowing where these nerve centers are is that you know where to rub your dog to instigate relaxation. And it’s more than simple relaxation. When you stroke your dog’s ears, the sensation he feels goes further than just the ears themselves. The intense pleasure he feels extends deep into his body.

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The Unlikely Animal Friends in the New Android Commercial

By Linda Cole

Every now and then, a commercial comes along that actually gets your attention. A new Android commercial, “Friends Furever,” not only got my attention, it also made me smile. It features 18 different unlikely animal friends, set to the toe tapping tune “Oo-de-lally” from the 1973 Disney animated movie “Robin Hood,” sung by Roger Miller.

The interspecies friendships in this heartwarming commercial show us how simple it is to get along – if we just try. Most of the animals featured were rescued by humans, but found comfort and healing through a special bond with an unlikely animal friend. Here are some of their stories:

Orangutan and Bluetick Hound

After losing his parents, Suryia the orangutan was rescued and sent to an animal sanctuary in Myrtle Beach, SC. He was withdrawn and refused to eat. To cheer him up, caretakers took him on elephant rides to a nearby pond to play. One day, a skinny hound followed them home. He refused to leave and kept finding ways into the sanctuary to be near Suryia. The sanctuary adopted him when an owner couldn’t be found. Normally dogs are afraid of primates, but these two developed an inseparable bond.

Rhino and Sheep

In 2014, staffers from the Hoedspruit Endangered Species Center in South Africa found a baby rhino next to his mother. Poachers had killed the adult rhino for her horn. Knowing the traumatized baby would die if left alone, he was sedated and taken back to the center. The little rhino, named Gertjie by the staff, was scared and apprehensive. To comfort him, a sheep was brought in and became his surrogate mother.

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