Category Archives: canine health

How to Recognize and Prevent Canine Car Sickness

car sick grantBy Langley Cornwell

Most dogs love to ride in the car, no matter whether it’s a short trip to the dog park or on a long road trip. The key phrase here is “most dogs.” For those of us who have dogs that get motion sickness – also called car sickness – it can be a challenge to even take the dog to the vet when necessary. If your dog does not do well in the car, you’ve probably driven past happy dogs with their head sticking out of a car window enjoying the wind, and thought: wouldn’t it be nice to be able to do that with my dog? So, why do some dogs enjoy car trips while other dogs get sick riding in the car?

Fear and Anxiety

If your dog is not accustomed to riding in the car, he may become anxious and essentially work himself up into being sick. Many times, especially in the case of anxiety motion sickness, it can take about 15 minutes before the dog vomits. To alleviate fear and anxiety and help your dog enjoy trips in the car, you will have to train the dog to associate the vehicle with good things.
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How to Help a Dog with Stiff Joints

stiff joints fredBy Laurie Darroch

Stiff joints in a dog can be caused by a variety of physical issues, or just simple aging. There are ways to help your dog achieve the best function and ambulation possible, as well as decrease the accompanying pain or discomfort.

Signs of Joint Pain

If your dog’s movement seems slower than normal, or they move in stiff awkward motions, they may be experiencing joint pain. Normal activities such as climbing the stairs or jumping up to a favorite resting spot may be difficult or even impossible. Obsessively licking a sore area, limping, swollen joints, resistance to normal physical activity, slow walking, or joints that are tender to your touch are all signs there is something amiss.


A gentle massage to the sore joints and surrounding areas can help loosen the stiffness your dog is experiencing. Some conditions may cause extreme joint pain. Check with your vet to make sure a massage is not going to damage your dog’s joints further. They can give you tips on how to do it effectively as well.
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3 Parasites You May Not Realize Your Pet Has

parasites BobBy Linda Cole

It’s not difficult to figure out if your pet has fleas. Left untreated, it doesn’t take long for a full blown flea infestation to invade your home and pet. It’s not always so easy, however, to tell when parasites are affecting your dog or cat. Here are three parasites you might not realize your pet has.

Cuterebra Parasite

The Cuterebra (Botfly) is a large, non-biting fly that lay eggs around openings of rabbit or rodent dens. Some eggs are deposited on plants and rocks in the area. Rabbits and rodents are the normal host for the fly, but dogs and cats can collect eggs on their coat when poking their head in and around burrow openings. Eggs exposed to the warmer body temperature of a pet hatch into larvae that crawl around looking for a way into their host, usually through the mouth or nasal passage during grooming, or through an open wound.
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Can Dogs Get Warts?

warts wplynnBy Linda Cole

It’s not uncommon to find small lumps and bumps on your dog, and most aren’t anything to worry about. Nevertheless, it’s always a good idea to monitor any lump to make sure it doesn’t change in color or size. If it does, call your vet immediately. Warts are small growths that seem to pop up on the skin out of the blue, and like us, dogs can get warts. The question is, how concerned should you be if you find a wart on your dog?

Warts are caused by an extremely contagious virus that all dogs have probably already been exposed to. Also known as papilloma or fibropapillomas, the virus causes usually benign skin growths that can develop on the face, eyes, eyelids, mouth, genital area, lower legs, feet, on the footpads and between the toes. Dog warts look similar to the warts people get, and can grow in clusters or alone. Sometimes a wart can be smooth. The virus is passed from dog to dog, but because it’s species specific, it can’t be passed on to you or your feline friends. It’s unclear why some dogs develop warts while others don’t, but it’s likely due to a weak or immature immune system and age. The virus affects young dogs and older canines, as well as dogs with compromised immune systems.
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5 Signs Your Dog Isn’t Feeling Well

By Laurie Darroch

Dogs cannot verbally tell us when they are not feeling well. They show it in altered behavior or physical cues. As we get to know the normal ways they act, any changes in their actions and reactions may be a sign that something is wrong. Here are five things to watch for.

Physical Symptoms

The most obvious signs that your dog is not feeling well may be a visible injury, infection or vomiting, but other signs take observation skills on your part. Skin lesions or irritating rashes, coughing, difficulty breathing, lumps, discolored eyes, excessive scratching, abnormal drooling or bad breath are all possible signs that can mean your dog is not feeling up to par. They may be signs of a simple condition that is easily treated, or of something more serious. If you have doubts or you can’t easily figure out what is actually wrong, go see your vet.

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Could Your Dog Have Fall Allergies Too?

allergies timothyBy Lyn Lomasi

You’ve seen or felt it all before: the sneezing, the itching, the watery eyes, the irritated nasal passages, and so on. But your dog is now displaying some of the behavior typical for fall allergies in humans. Could your dog have fall allergies too? Is this even possible? What signs and symptoms should you be concerned about, and when is the appropriate time to pick up the phone and call the vet?

Can Dogs Be Affected By Hay Fever?

The answer to this may not be quite what you’re thinking. If you see your dog struggling with what seems like hay fever or fall allergies, you might be correct. However, in dogs, it is often referred to as atopy. Some of the symptoms of atopy are similar to what humans would experience with hay fever. Atopy is also most common in the fall season. Some of the signs and symptoms vary greatly from hay fever. Fall allergies in dogs can range from mild to serious. Learn the signs to watch for, as well as when the appropriate time to contact your vet is going to be.

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