Category Archives: cat behavior

6 Reasons Your Pet Might Seek You Out

pets seek us dennisBy Linda Cole

My dog Max enjoys sitting outside in his pen on a low table so he can see the surrounding area – just in case he needs to protect his turf from a squirrel, cat or other “dangers” in the yard. When he spots an intruder he leaps from his perch and races to the gate, barking as he runs. Then he trots excitedly back to me, barking as if to say “Come and look.” Pets place their trust in us and have many reasons why they might seek us out. It may be nothing more than the excitement of seeing another animal, but it could also be because they need your help or are trying to warn you of danger.


Like human family members, our dogs and cats might be off doing their own thing, such as chasing imaginary prey in their sleep, barking at squirrels, or gazing through a window at the birds. Most pets aren’t able to spend their entire waking moments with their owner, and they enjoy having some alone time. However, if you have a strong bond with your dog or cat, sooner or later they will come to you for a relaxing massage, back scratching, some playtime or just to say hello.
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Why Do Cats Grind Their Teeth?

cat teeth ianBy Langley Cornwell

While tooth grinding is generally considered to be a human problem, cats also do it. In fact, tooth grinding in cats even has a special name – it’s called Bruxism. Have you ever seen or heard a cat grinding his teeth? It’s not a pretty sight and it sounds downright painful. Any loving cat owner who has heard this sound will want to know what’s causing this behavior. They’ll also want to know how to make their cat stop doing it.

With cats, tooth grinding is not usually a habit or a “tic” like it can be with humans. If your cat is grinding or gnashing his teeth, there is likely a root cause and the Bruxism is simply a symptom. Here are some possible causes.

Oral Pain

If you’ve ever watched a cat play, you know they will put just about anything in their mouths. This could lead to dental problems, abscesses, burns and jaw problems. When your cat grinds his teeth, especially if the grinding is accompanied with drooling or excessive salivation, it’s likely that he is experiencing some kind of oral pain. If you can, check your cat’s mouth for sores, broken teeth or any inflammation. You may need to visit your veterinarian to safely and thoroughly check the cats mouth and throat, after all those teeth and claws can do some damage.
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Do Cats Really Ignore Their People?

cat study amyBy Linda Cole

Our feline friends are very good at disguising their true feelings. Sometimes it’s hard to know if your cat stares at you for attention or because she’s plotting her next move. Two of my cats will come when called, but the others usually don’t, unless I’m dishing out their CANIDAE cat food. Even though most felines don’t obey commands like our canine friends do, a 2013 study found that cats generally do care about their people and really don’t ignore us.

When cats made the decision to move in and interact with humans around 9,000 years ago, it wasn’t necessary for them to obey commands from people. They went about their business catching the rodents that were attracted to crops, and humans like having them around because of their hunting skills. The more docile kitties were most likely allowed into homes. The wildcat ancestors of modern day house cats essentially domesticated themselves, but there wasn’t really a reason for cats to develop a responsive behavior towards us.
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7 Signs of a Happy Cat

happy cat belalBy Julia Williams

Happy Cat, Happy Life…right? True, that doesn’t have quite the alliterative ring the popular adage Happy Wife, Happy Life has, but it’s still accurate. We cat lovers want our feline friends to be happy, which in turn makes us happy humans. So, how do you know if your cat is happy? Here are a few ways:


Although cats also purr when they are scared, nervous, sick or injured, you can be sure that if your kitty is curled up on your lap and purring away while you pet or brush them, they are content.


Some cats have more to say than others, but most cats will engage in a good gab fest with you now and then. When your feline friend is feeling especially chatty – like she’s telling you the best story ever – she’s saying she is one happy kitty and she enjoys your company. One caveat with this though: some cats are just naturally quiet; when these cats become overly talkative, it can be a sign of unhappiness.
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Why Do Cats Hoard Useless Items & Bring Us Gifts?

cats hoard david blackwellBy Langley Cornwell

Most cat owners have seen evidence that their feline friend is a hoarder in one way or another. They might find a stash of trinkets near the cat’s food dish, or a collection of toys where the cat spends the most time relaxing. Whatever tactics cats employ, they do it in plentiful numbers and leave their owners baffled. There are some opposing theories as to why a cat’s hoarding behavior occurs in the first place.

Developing Hunting Skills

Just as all animals have natural instincts and practice using them when they are young, so goes the life of a cat. They are hunters and they have to teach their children, or kittens, to appreciate their prey. They might bring dead prey to their young kittens in order to start feeding them solid food. Eventually, they will also bring live food to the young ones so that they too can practice the art of the kill.

Some speculators believe that a cat’s hoarding behavior is simulating bringing the prey back to the home base. This is why cats often bring it to their food dish. Even finding the item in the first place may be part of the skill of the hunt. You can see this behavior demonstrated when cats practice stalking behavior on things they aren’t going to kill, or can’t kill. It’s just part of their developmental process.
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7 Tips to Stop Your Cats from Fighting

cat fight moreshethBy Julia Williams

If you have more than one cat, there may come a time when you have to deal with feline conflict. You can’t just ignore the fighting and hope that your cats will work it out themselves – they usually won’t. Here are 7 tips to help you keep the peace in a multi-cat home.

Identify the Cause

Be aware that a full-on fight – where the fur flies and the claws come out – is actually a late stage in a progression of more subtle signs of feline disagreement. It’s likely that tension has been building for awhile, but it can be easy to miss until it escalates to actual fighting.

Cats may fight for a number of reasons; sometimes the cause is apparent and other times it can take some keen observation and diligent detective work to figure it out. It could be turf tiffs, redirected aggression, jealousy, boredom, bullying, hormones or a new cat in the house. Cats might also fight as a byproduct of stress, such as a move to a new home or a change in their routine.

Regardless of what you think might be causing the behavior change, it’s always wise to start with a visit to your vet to rule out any medical problems. When two cats who have always gotten along suddenly start fighting, there could be an underlying medical issue.
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