Category Archives: designer breed

How an Abandoned Dog Found Her True Calling

By Linda Cole

Sometimes, life throws even dogs a curve ball and they suddenly find themselves abandoned and alone. And sometimes, life has something special in store for a little homeless dog left all alone. This is a story about an abandoned dog named Antoinette, and how she found her true calling.

When this story began for Annie, it could have had a completely different ending if the right person hadn’t found her. It’s easy to pass judgment on others, especially when it comes to the treatment of a pet, but none of us really knows how we will react to a situation until we’re confronted with one. Sometimes, it’s hard to see a light at the end of the tunnel and we make the decision we feel is right at the time. For Annie, everything turned out better than her owner could have guessed. Her guardian angels were watching over her and placed Annie’s fate in the hands of a stranger who found her in a dog park on a cold Thanksgiving night last year in Springfield, Illinois.

Stormy Edwards was walking her dog when she heard a dog barking from the Stuart Park area. The dog sounded like she was in trouble, so Edwards decided to investigate. As she neared the sound of the barking, she realized it was coming from one of the pens in the dog park. Using a flashlight, Edwards found a scared and confused Cockapoo named Annie that had been left inside one of the pens, along with a dish of lasagna and a bowl of water. A note had been placed under the lasagna that began with “My name is Antoinette, Annie for short.” The note went on to say that Annie’s owner had become too ill to care for her and she had put Annie in the pen in hopes another dog lover would find her and take her home. Annie’s shots were up-to-date and she had been spayed. It ended with a plea to whoever found Annie, “Please take me home. I am a loving dog.” The note was written by a woman.

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Planting Pet Friendly Gardens

Gardening with Pets
You might think it’s not possible to have dogs and cats, as well as a garden, whether that garden is indoors or out. But, you can have the best of both worlds if you are willing to follow some simple rules. 
Safety First: Be very cautious about soil and fertilizer. Many organic fertilizers are made out of bone meal, blood meal or fish emulsion, which can smell like dinner to a curious dog or cat. 
Minimize Mulch: If you have a dog, avoid cocoa bean mulch in the garden or keep your dog in areas of the yard where you don’t use this mulch. Safer alternatives include bark, grass clippings and fall leaves. 
Location, Location, Location: Plan your garden. Your goal is to keep pets out, keep plants in. This can be done by simply planning the layout of your garden. Plant hearty, thick perennials along the outer border so if Fido oversteps his boundaries, he’s not doing any damage. The more delicate plants should be in the center of the garden. 
Keep Kitty At Bay: Cats go wild for catnip (Nepeta catoria), which is a member of the Mint family. Catmint (Nepeta faassenii and related species) is another favorite. Fortunately, both are tough plants that seem able to withstand feline attention, so keep them in a separate area away from your garden, or on the outskirts of the garden. On that same note, avoid having any bare areas of soil around the garden. While it may look nice to humans, it is simply too tempting as a litter box to the stray passerby. 
When In Doubt, Fence It: Occasionally, it’s just easier to fence the area off. If you have a very determined feline or very nosy pup, it’s best to just fence the area off.
Following these simple rules will help alleviate your frustration, keep your pets safe, and if you’re lucky – discourage other pets from entering. If you continue to have problems, we’ll be addressing that in an upcoming issue of Responsible Pet Ownership.

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The personal opinions and/or use of trade, corporate or brand names, is for information and convenience only. Such use does not constitute an endorsement by CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods of any product or service. Opinions are those of the individual authors and not necessarily of CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods.

The History of Dog

The ancestry of the dog can be traced back as far as sixty million years. Beginning with the Miatis, the small weasel-like creature is thought to have demonstrated the first characteristics of the animal now recognized as Canis lupus familiaris, or “dog” to you and me. It is this creature that evolved into the earliest wolf.
Every dog we have was bred over centuries to create what we now know as breeds. And guess what? The new “designer breeds” are just more attempts at breeding the perfect mutt.
And yet, all are a result of… you guessed it – the wolf.
Even the most popular purebred is actually a crossbreed. A Yorkshire terrier was crossed with an Australian terrier to produce the Silky Terrier. The Bulldog was crossed with a Mastiff to get a Bullmastiff. The Doberman is a result of a German shepherd being crossed with a German Pinscher, and later crosses with the Greyhound, Weimeraner and Black and Tan Manchester terrier further refined the breed.
So when you think about spending thousands of dollars on a “purebred dog” or a “designer breed”, take a deep breath, cleanse your mind, and walk on over to your local shelter. Chances are good, they have the “designer” type you want and no breeding is necessary….

The personal opinions and/or use of trade, corporate or brand names, is for information and convenience only. Such use does not constitute an endorsement by CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods of any product or service. Opinions are those of the individual authors and not necessarily of CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods.

Mixed Up Mutts, Designer Dog Breeds

Recently, there’s been a lot of talk about designer breeds, dogs that are “designed” or “bred” to obtain a specific result. An example might be the “Labradoodle”, a supposedly hypo-allergenic dog. You can either go online and buy one for thousands of dollars or you can take a drive down to your local shelter and find one for less than $100. 
I’m a big fan of designer breeds. In fact, I have three in my office with me right now – Roscoe is a Beagledor (essentially a 60 lb beagle), Cheiss is a Chaussie (Australian shepherd and chow), and of course Tristan is a Wolote (a very rare, coyote/wolf/shepherd). 
The cool thing about designer breeds is you get to name them yourself! 
“Designer Breeds”
I watched some people in the park the other day. A woman was watching a beautiful dog chase and successfully catch every ball his owner threw. The dog dove into the lake like a champ, refused to chase the ducks, and was in all – a perfect canine gentleman. She approached the owner, asking what breed the dog was and where she could find one of her own.
The man proudly proclaimed, “Why, he’s an Aussiedor! A rare, very expensive breed. In fact, there are only two breeders in the US that I’m aware of.” He went on to pass along the contact information for his breeder and the woman left, anxious to begin her hunt. 
And yet, he’s simply describing a dog that is a mix between an Australian Shepherd and a Labrador. I was at the shelter yesterday where I saw three of them…. Each was adoptable that day for $85, yet she’ll likely pay a breeder over $1,000 if she doesn’t do her homework. 
What’s In A Name? 
They sound lovely and exotic. And expensive. Here are just a few examples: 
Ba-Shar (Basset Hound crossed with a Shar-pei)
Brusselranian (Brussels Griffon crossed with a Pomeranian),
Corillion (Papillon crossed with a Pembroke Welsh Corgi)
Imo-Inu (American Eskimo crossed with a Shiba Inu) 
Wee-Chon (Bichon Frise crossed with a Westie) 
What kind of designer dog do you have? Leave us a comment and tell us all about it!

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The personal opinions and/or use of trade, corporate or brand names, is for information and convenience only. Such use does not constitute an endorsement by CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods of any product or service. Opinions are those of the individual authors and not necessarily of CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods.