Category Archives: dog breeds

The Versatile and Adaptable German Shepherd

By Linda Cole

During WWI, Lee Duncan was a U.S. army corporal stationed in France. On September 15, 1918, he was on patrol when he spotted a dog kennel heavily damaged from a recent bombing raid. Convincing his battalion to change course so they could check out the kennel, Duncan was surprised to discover five newborn puppies and their mom still alive. The pups and mother were rescued and taken back to camp, but only one puppy survived. We know him as Rin Tin Tin, a movie legend who showed the versatile, adaptable and loyal character of the German Shepherd dog.

The German Shepherd is a fairly new breed that was developed mostly during the 1900s. The breed originated in Germany as a top notch herding dog. German breeder Captain Max von Stephanitz wanted a herding dog that was capable and intelligent, with a good work ethic. In 1899, he mixed early versions of shepherd dogs to come up with the Deutsche Schaferhunde, the German Shepherd dog. Standard for the breed was written in 1901. The first dog in the United States was imported in 1907 and shown in the open class at Newcastle and Philadelphia dog shows.

The dog that von Stephanitz developed turned out to be not only smart and adaptable, but had many talents that were discovered during WWI. The Germans put the GSD to work as a war dog. Allied forces took notice of these versatile dogs used by the Germans, and were equally impressed with the breed. German Shepherds were used as Red Cross dogs, supply carriers, guard dogs, tracking dogs, sentinels and messengers.
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Dogs and Cats Recognized as Official State Mascots

By Linda Cole

Every state has a flag, seal, motto, emblem, song, animal, flower, tree and bird, unique to each one. No matter where you live, our symbols reflect who we are as a country, and the diversity that make up the stars in Old Glory.

Dog State Mascots

Alaska – When you think of sledding dogs, the first breed that comes to mind is the hard-working Siberian Husky. But it’s the Alaskan Malamute that was chosen as the state’s official dog in 2010. The Siberian Husky was a close second, but the Malamute has been part of Alaskan history for 5,000 years plus, and contributed more than any other breed to the development of the state.

Louisiana – The most aggressive and largest of the cattle dogs, the Catahoula Leopard Dog was picked in 1979 as their state dog. The Catahoula is all-American breed capable of finding livestock in any kind of terrain, no matter where they are. The breed was developed by settlers and Native American Indians.

Maryland – The Chesapeake Bay Retriever was recognized in 1964. When an English ship wrecked off the coast of Maryland in 1807, the crew and two Newfoundland pups were rescued by an American ship. The puppies were given to duck hunters as a thank you gift from the British crew. They were bred with local hunting dogs to create the beginnings of the Chesapeake Bay Retriever.

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Which Dog Breeds Live The Longest?

By Langley Cornwell

Owning a dog is one of the most rewarding experiences in life, and picking the right one is important. There are countless things to consider when finding a breed – such as size, temperament, intelligence and space available. It’s also a good idea to take your lifestyle and the dog breed’s activity requirements into consideration. All of these things are important, but one important factor often gets overlooked: how long will the dog live?

Dogs are pretty resilient. If you adopt a young dog, your pet will likely be a part of your life for many years. Still, the sad fact is that a dog will generally not live as long as we do. With that said, you might be interested in knowing that different breeds have different life expectancies.

What makes a particular breed live longer?

According to webMD, dogs that generally live longer are small dogs, and the smaller they are when fully grown, the longer they tend to live. The converse holds true as well; the bigger the breed, the shorter the lifespan. Giant breeds are the shortest lived. It appears that weight is the key factor and not height, however. Bigger, heavier dog breeds tend to die at about the eight year mark. Smaller dogs can live in excess of fifteen years.

Bear in mind that particular breeds sometimes have breed-specific health issues. For example, Cocker Spaniels often have eye and ear infections, while Labrador Retrievers are known for having a high cancer incidence. In fact, my Lab did have a cancerous lump when she was young but they removed it with plenty of healthy margin and it never came back.

There are countless other instances of breed-specific health problems but still, the number one thing to look out for is weight. Larger dogs, ones weighing over a hundred pounds, will be considered quite elderly at about seven or eight years.

Female dogs typically tend to live longer than male dogs, but the difference is negligible. Mixed breeds are usually longer living than pure bred dogs, so be sure to keep that in mind when choosing what kind of dog to get.

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What Do the 8 AKC Dog Breed Groups Mean?

akc groups aussiegallBy Linda Cole

The American Kennel Club, established in 1884, is a registry of purebred dogs in the United States. To help categorize breeds, dogs are put into one of eight groups based on why the breed was created – i.e., what his job is.

Herding Group

The main function of dogs in this group is to control the movement of other animals. AKC created this newest classification in 1983. Prior to that, they were members of the Working Group. These breeds have the stamina and superb athletic ability to work long hours in difficult weather conditions and over rough terrain. Their job is to drive livestock or herd sheep, controlling them by manipulating their movements. They are extremely intelligent, able to problem solve and have the ability to work on their own when necessary.

Sporting Group

Members of this group were developed to flush out and retrieve quarry on land or in water. In Europe it’s called the Gundog Group, and many of the breeds have their origins in European countries. At one time, hunting was essential to provide food for the family and dogs were indispensable in helping the hunter locate fowl hiding in thick underbrush. When hunting with guns became more popular, retrievers were developed to bring back quarry that had been shot down. These dogs have a generally laid back temperament, are very intelligent, easy to train and want to please.

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Eight Tough-to-Train Dog Breeds

By Linda Cole

Some of the more challenging dog breeds to train are also among the smartest. Part of the problem with smart dogs is they can think for themselves and quickly learn how to control their owner.

Dog intelligence is determined by how many repetitions it takes for a dog to learn a new command or task. Breeds considered the smartest learn in just a few repetitions. Canines at the bottom of the list take a lot longer to catch on. It’s not that they aren’t as bright as the top tiered dogs; they just need more motivation.

Border Collies can either be one of the most challenging – or easiest – dogs to train. This free thinking, problem solving and sensitive herder is capable of learning new things in just one try, but you can’t use heavy-handed training methods. This breed can be difficult for an inexperienced owner to train because he is an intelligent dog and notices absolutely everything you do. Subtle changes in your tone of voice and hand gestures can confuse him, because he thinks you’re teaching a new command. You have to be exact each time with your commands and gestures.

Beagles are happy, confident dogs from the hound group. This lovable scenthound has a stubborn streak a mile long, which can cause a novice trainer to throw up his arms in defeat. He needs a good reason to learn. Your best training tool is lots of tasty, healthy dog treats like CANIDAE Pure Heaven Duck or Salmon. Beagles love food, and are willing to learn anything for a favorite treat. The U.S. Department of Agriculture started the Beagle Brigade in 1984 to sniff out contraband food coming into the country via airports because this cute, friendly and small dog isn’t as intimidating as larger dogs.

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Eight Easy-to-Train Small Dog Breeds

Yorkie

By Linda Cole

Training any dog can be hard if you aren’t consistent and dedicated. Small dogs, which include terriers, come with big attitudes and aren’t afraid to take on big jobs. These dogs are intelligent, agile and tenacious. Dogs under 22 pounds or standing under 16 inches are considered small, although there are some small breeds that weigh a little more and are taller. If you want a small dog that’s easy to train, there’s a nice variety to pick from, including the breeds listed below. Carry a pocketful of CANIDAE Pure Heaven treats, and these dogs will practically train themselves! LOL.

Yorkshire Terrier

This breed has been in the top ten most popular dogs for the last decade. The Yorkie may be small, but he’s all terrier, with an expertise in rooting out and catching rats and other small rodents. The breed was developed in northern England’s Yorkshire County to control rodents in coal mines and textile factories. Earlier dogs were larger than the breed we know today, and fearless when it came to doing their job. It wasn’t long before high society adopted the Yorkie as a companion pet, and that’s when the breed was bred down to the size we know today.

Pomeranian 

The smallest of the Spitz family of dogs, the Pomeranian is descended from Northern breeds like the Norwegian Elkhound, American Eskimo Dog, Samoyed and Schipperke. Before this breed was bred down to their 3-7 pound size, Poms weighed up to 30-35 pounds. The dog was developed in Pomerania, a small province in today’s eastern Germany. This compact little dog can excel at agility and obedience, or be happy hanging out in the lap of the one he loves.

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