Category Archives: dog food

The True Story of CANIDAE

CANIDAE True StoryThe Road to Here…

From the first truckload of pet food we delivered from the back of our pick-up trucks, to the latest batch cooked up in our Ethos Pet Nutrition plant in Brownwood, Texas—our story is one we’re proud of.

CANIDAE Natural Pet Food Company started out as a family owned company, and we still are today. We’re one of the last, true independent companies making pet food—and we will continue to be.

We’re excited to share our story with you. How we started out from humble beginnings. Our commitment to quality in our ingredients. And our absolute promise that what we say on the bag is exactly what’s in it. Find out more about CANIDAE and our commitment when you watch our new video online at canidae.com/truestory.

We  started out as pioneers in the pet food industry with one goal in mind: Make the best pet food possible. We’ve been doing that now for 18 years. And we’ll keep on doing it, one bag at a time.

John Gordon and Scott Whipple  
co–founders/co–owners

Learn more about our company and our commitment in our new video:

 http://www.canidae.com/truestory

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Why Does My Dog Eat His Food Away From the Bowl?

dog eat djunBy Langley Cornwell

Do you have a pet who takes a mouthful of food and walks away, drops it on the floor and then eats small bits of it away from the bowl, possibly even in a corner? This is more common in dogs but cats may also do it, and this pet behavior leaves many owners scratching their heads.

This article will help you understand why some pets eat their food away from the bowl.

Pack Mentality

Many animal experts agree that pack mentality is one reason why dogs will go to their dinner dish, remove tasty morsels of the CANIDAE food and take it someplace else in the home or yard to eat it. Some dogs will just go a short distance away from their dishes and others will go far away or even to a hiding spot such as behind the couch or under the table to eat their food.

The biggest reason for this behavior is instinct. Dogs have this natural pack mentality and depending on factors such as breed, training and family line, some dogs have this instinct more strongly than others. If you’ve ever watched wolves on a nature show, you might be familiar with the feeding frenzy that is wild animals eating.

You probably don’t see your pampered little pooch in the same way, but some of that instinct may be lingering. Your dog is saying, “This is mine. Don’t take it” when he moves that food away.

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How to Stop Dogs from Guarding Their Food

By Langley Cornwell

Food guarding is a natural behavior in most dogs. In fact, the act of guarding any prized possession is inherent in canines.  Before dogs were domesticated, wild animals that successfully protected their valuable resources were the most likely to survive.

These days, food guarding is inadvertently reinforced in young puppies. Some dog breeders feed their puppies from a single large bowl so at mealtime puppies have to compete with one another for their fair share of the food. The puppy that is able to eat the most food will grow quicker than his littermates. He will also get stronger faster, which means he will get even more of the food, and so on. This seemingly innocent set of circumstances ultimately rewards aggressive behavior in dogs at a young age.

That’s why food guarding is so common in dogs, but what can we do about it?

Food guarding can become a serious issue if you don’t take steps to manage it. For your own safety and the safety of family members and guests, it’s important to teach your dog to remain relaxed while he eats – no matter who’s around or what’s going on. If you have a dog with aggressive food-guarding issues, these steps will help you break his tendency to guard his food.
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Neela and the CANIDAE Package

By Laurie Darroch (and Neela)

When I was approached to blog for CANIDAE, being the dog lover I am, I was definitely interested. I will not, however, write for a company I know nothing about or back a product I have had no experience with.

I checked out the CANIDAE website and liked what I read about the products and the standards they reach for in both quality and a healthy line of products for dogs and cats. That told me they actually care about the animals. But the ultimate test with any food is whether or not my dog likes it. In the past, I’ve had some issues with getting her to eat. She has turned up her nose up at other dog food and treats and only finally ate them when she got overly hungry.

CANIDAE sent several different samples of dry food and treats for Neela to try, and quite frankly, I was astonished at her instant positive reaction to each of them. It was funny to see how excited she got and how eagerly she ate everything she tried. Here is the experience from her point of view.

My name is Neela. I am a blue-nosed Pit Bull puppy. Mom says I am a nosey parker. I simply have to know what is going on with everything and everybody, you know. I mean, that is part of my job isn’t it?
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Why Dogs and Cats Shouldn’t Eat Each Other’s Food

unused by bambe1964 okBy Linda Cole

It’s not uncommon for dogs and cats to steal each other’s food whenever they see an opening. My dogs can clean out the cats’ dry food bowl in two seconds if given the opportunity. Snacking on each other’s food once in awhile isn’t likely to cause problems, but eating a steady diet of pet food that’s not made specifically for a dog or cat can be trouble. There are good reasons why dogs and cats shouldn’t eat each other’s food.

Cats are obligate carnivores, which means they have to eat meat regularly to get the proper nutrients needed to maintain good health. Felines are equipped with sharp teeth that aid them in grasping prey, killing it, and then tearing off and eating bite size pieces. Because they don’t have molars that have a grinding surface, like humans and dogs, cats tend to swallow their food whole. The jaw can only move up and down, and isn’t equipped to move side to side in a chewing motion. Without a way to properly crunch up a piece of dog food, which is usually larger than kitty kibble, felines are at risk of choking on a piece of dry dog food.

Dogs are omnivores, and have a digestive system that can handle grains and vegetables as well as meat, but they don’t require as much protein as cats. Proteins are the building blocks for cells, tissues, organs, antibodies, enzymes and hormones, and needed for body growth, reproduction and maintaining body functions. The feline body will break down protein in their muscles if they don’t get enough of it in their diet.

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Ashes the Fire Dog Fuels Up with Help from CANIDAE

Ashes 2By Langley Cornwell

Sometimes CANIDAE gets the honor of helping out truly special pets and their amazing owners. It’s even more amazing when the duo goes further than just making a phenomenal team, but actually helps save lives and solves crimes together. That’s why I would like you to meet Ashes, a five-year-old chocolate Labrador fire dog, and her owner and partner, Brooktrails Fire Chief Daryl Schoeppner, of California.

What makes this story even more unique is the outpouring of community support and hard work—by both Ashes and Schoeppner—that it took to form their partnership. In fact, the community has stayed involved and continues to do what’s necessary to keep it going strong. You see, Ashes is a completely donation-driven dog, meaning that taxpayers are not charged for her upkeep or training.

Ashes herself was a gift. Schoeppner lost his first fire dog and partner of ten years to cancer. That special dog was an accelerant-detecting golden retriever named Eddie, who was also sponsored with dog food from CANIDAE. When sympathizers in Devonshire, England, heard about Eddie’s death, they gifted Ashes to the program.

It’s Hard Work Being a Hero

“She definitely earns her groceries,” says Chief Schoeppner, when asked about Ashes’ workload.

Having already helped to investigate over a dozen arson cases in 2013 alone, one memorable case Ashes and Schoeppner worked to solve wrapped up last year in Mendocino County. In this case, a 52-year-old mother was found guilty and sentenced to 13 years in prison for setting fire to her home while her quadriplegic son was inside. The fire was particularly dangerous to local firefighters, as propane and oxygen tanks were used as accelerants.

And it’s not just major local arson cases the duo work to solve. They are a shared resource for the Mendocino, Lake and Sonoma County region. Ashes also recently helped with a weapons search in a local high school, searching over 600 lockers after a weapon was discovered at the school.

ashes 3Rigorous Training Required

There is a lot of training – for both dog and handler – that goes into making an arson dog worthy to carry the title. Considering that what these canines discover is used for court evidence in cases like the one above, the evidence has to be solid enough to withstand the courtroom environment. The work is so rigorous and scrutinized that there are less than a hundred canines in the U.S. that do this type of work.

Ashes has always proven more than worthy of the challenge, though. When she was almost a year old, she was flown to Texas to attend the Canine Academy Training Center for three months of intensive training. It’s not easy detecting accelerants when you’re talking parts per billion. As part of her testing, she would have to identify one syringe drop of accelerant, such as 50 percent weathered gasoline, in a mixed matrix of materials, explained Schoeppner.

For example, containers mixed with carpet fibers, wood and plastics would be presented to Ashes and she would have to locate which one contained the tiny drop of fire accelerant. That alone is amazing, but Ashes had to identify the substance correctly within a six-inch area. Ashes can detect specific substances in vehicles, on the clothing of suspects and in large open areas, such as parking lots.

After her individual training course, Chief Schoeppner joined Ashes for an additional two weeks of intense training. They had to prove that they could pull their own weight, singularly and as a team, and meet every criteria with a 100 percent correct rating. “She’s a multi-disciplined dog and quite the working girl,” said Schoeppner.

The initial thorough training isn’t all there is to it, either. They have to be re-certified every year in order to work together. Ashes and Schoeppner will soon be traveling to San Diego to do just that. There they will be joining other arson dogs, including three others from the state, although Ashes is the only public agency dog in Northern California. Washington and Colorado are also expected to have dogs present.

Giving Back to the Community

In addition to firefighting, Schoeppner and Ashes participate in grade school fire safety education by visiting local elementary schools. Ashes is a hit with the children. “She’s a great tool to get the attention of the kids,” said Schoeppner. “We even have trading cards with Ashes’ photo and stats to hand out.”

This is fitting, considering the community support it takes to adequately see to Ashes’ care. Their initial training and travel costs were covered by the Mendocino County Fire Chiefs Association, who is a big supporter of the program. The community at-large also donates, through fundraisers and a special dog house, as well as collections taken at local merchants’ counters.

Ashes is so well recognized in the community that Schoeppner says people always come up and ask him, “Hi, how’s the dog?” and then inquire after him. Not that he minds. “She’s the rock star and I’m the roadie,” Schoeppner jokes.

Fueling a Fire Dog

CANIDAE has been happily providing food for Ashes for five years. For ten years before that, they supplied the food for Eddie. It all started 15 years ago when Schoeppner contacted a member of the CANIDAE sales team, who was always supportive of making sure he had what he needed.

Even his vet is pleased with the use of CANIDAE dog food for Ashes, citing good weight and health. “Without CANIDAE’s sponsorship, it would be very difficult for us,” said Schoeppner. “I’ve always liked the food and it’s a great working dog food. I would like to extend a special thank-you to CANIDAE.”

Photos by Daryl Schoeppner /Brooktrails Fire Department

Read more articles by Langley Cornwell