Category Archives: dog-friendly activities

5 Dog-Friendly National Parks

national parks fpat murrayBy Linda Cole

There are 58 national parks in the United States, and each one has its own awe-inspiring beauty and wildlife to enjoy. Last year, almost 70 million people visited a national park. If you are planning a trip that includes your dog and would like to take in the views of our national parks, some do allow limited access for canines, and five are considered to be “dog friendly.”

Pet access varies from park to park. Park superintendents have the authority to adjust pet policies at their specific park to ensure that the land, wildlife and the pets are protected. It’s important to plan ahead before heading out to a national park, historic site or seashore, and do research to make sure pets are welcome. Many national parks only allow dogs in designated areas like roads and developed areas. Most trails or wilderness areas are off limits to canines. Finding lodging for you and your pet can also be a challenge, but some parks do have kennels for pets. The only exception are service dogs who are allowed to go everywhere with their owner.

You can find current information about pet policies, entry fees, park hours and scheduled events at national parks on the National Park Service website. For pet policies, go to the search bar in the upper right hand corner where it says “find a park.” Click on a state and scroll down to find the national park you’re interested in. On the left side, click on plan your visit, click basic information, scroll down and click pets. You will also notice a red box for park alerts such as weather updates and construction projects.

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7 Tips for Taking Your Dog to a Public Gathering

dog event evaBy Laurie Darroch

Even if your dog is very well trained, an outing to a crowded public gathering such as a flea market, outdoor concert or art festival can be a challenge with so many distractions and temptations. You can help make the event more fun and less stressful if you go prepared. First, you’ll need to make sure dogs are allowed where you are going, because you can’t leave your dog in the car if they aren’t permitted to join you at the event. Here are some tips for a successful outing with your four legged friend.

Food and Treats

Feed your dog before the outing, particularly if there will be food served there. Your dog will be less likely to beg for food or bother people who have it if they are already full. Even a very well trained dog gets tempted sometimes when there are so many intriguing smells and so many people with food milling around.

Bring along some CANIDAE dog biscuits in case you need to encourage good behavior while you are out and about.  If you keep some handy, you can reinforce any social training you may be doing with your dog as well.

Leash Up!

Many public places or gatherings require that all dogs be on a leash. It is too easy for your dog to dart off to an interesting distraction if they are off leash. Chances are there will be plenty of other dogs present as well, and not all dogs get along.

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Geocaching with Your Dog

By Langley Cornwell

When I was young, I used to love scavenger hunts. I think I was first introduced to hunts at Girl Scout Camp and from then on, I was hooked. I remember asking my parents to organize a scavenger hunt for my birthday party that year and the trend took off. Several of my friends followed suit, and we had loads of fun racing around gathering random things. Eventually we got too cool to run around the neighborhood gathering stuff, and the scavenger hunt craze fizzled out among my pals.

I had not given my scavenging days much thought until I ran across an article about Geocaching. According to The Official Global GPS Cache Hunt Website, geocaching is a free real-world outdoor treasure hunting game using GPS-enabled devices. Players try to navigate to a specific set of GPS coordinates and then attempt to find the geocache (container) hidden at that location. Players may then share their experiences with an online community of cachers. Currently, there are about 122,615 active caches in more than 210 countries.

Geocaching is a compound word including GEO for geography, and CACHING, which refers to the process of hiding a cache. This is not to be confused with cache in computer terms, which usually refers to information stored in memory to make it faster to retrieve. In this context, cache refers to a term that is also used in hiking/camping as a hiding place for concealing and preserving provisions. Geocaching containers are usually weather-resistant vessels holding a logbook along with an array of coins, plastic toys, key chains and other small items for trade.

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