Category Archives: Eliza Wynn

A Microchip Can Bring Your Pet Home

By Eliza Wynn

Uh-oh. Little Bootsie went out the doggie door, and you had no idea someone had left the gate open. Now you can’t find her. If someone else does, will that person be able to find you?

As a loving and responsible pet owner, you want your pet to be safe at all times. In the event that your pet gets loose and starts roaming the streets, getting her back home is essential. Home escapes aren’t the only potential dangers, though; pets can also find themselves alone and vulnerable after accidents and natural disasters. Pets with microchips are much more likely than those without them to be reunited with their owners. This means that if your dog or cat doesn’t have a registered microchip, you’re taking a huge risk.

In early August, a Pomeranian named Koda was reunited with his family in Arkansas after somehow making his way to a shelter in California. Shortly before that, Wobbles the Shih Tzu went home after being missing for about a year. Not to be outdone, a Massachusetts cat named Charlie was recently found 25 miles from home after just 1 day. What do these pets have in common? They all experienced the joy of a happy reunion simply because they had registered microchips.

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How to Slow Down a Fast Eater

By Eliza Wynn

If your dog is a fast eater, you’ve probably had to clean up after him more than once. There are two reasons for the need to clean after your pet eats:  the area can get messy during the feeding frenzy, and gulped-down food doesn’t always stay down. Either way, it’s no fun for you, and in the latter case, it’s no fun for your dog either.

Dogs that tend to eat too fast can’t catch a break. They have the hungries, and the food is right there waiting for them, so what’s the problem? Why should they slow down and risk letting a piece of kibble get away? It’s not fair!

It may not be fair, but it’s much better for your dog to slow down at mealtime. Fast eaters tend to have more digestive problems than those who take their time. Besides being a choking hazard, eating too fast increases the risk of dangerous bloating from swallowing too much air. Fortunately, there are a few things responsible pet owners can do to help slow down a fast eater.

Feed by hand

If you have time, try hand feeding your dog. It’s a terrific way to spend quality time with him, and since you control the pace, this is the most effective way to get him to eat more slowly. Offer one piece at a time; if you don’t hear any crunching, hold back a few seconds before offering another bite.

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Tips for Living with a Dog that Misses Someone

By Eliza Wynn

Have you ever wondered whether your dog misses someone who used to be a big part of his day-to-day life? Humans aren’t the only species with the ability to bond – or to miss those with whom they’ve bonded. Pets have feelings, and they definitely miss beloved pack members when they’re apart. The good news is that there are ways you can help ease the loneliness and stress your dog feels when a loved one isn’t around.

Spending time with your dog is always important, but it’s even more so when he misses someone. In addition to simply keeping him company while you go about your day, be sure to set aside some special time for your canine friend. He’ll appreciate playtime, walks, training games and just hanging out together. Make sure he has a job to do, and don’t forget to talk to him. Even if you’re convinced he doesn’t understand a word you say, the positive attention and the sound of your voice will be more than welcome.

Nowadays, many people travel frequently for both business and pleasure. Others move out, sometimes temporarily while attending college, but often permanently. Pets that have bonded closely with them can get lonely, anxious or even depressed. Fortunately, being apart doesn’t always have to mean complete separation; technology provides several options to bridge the gap. For example, webcams and smartphones enable users to see each other even when they’re miles apart. If your dog misses someone who’s away, try setting up a video chat. If that’s not possible, even a simple phone call in which he can hear his friend’s voice will reassure him.

Sadly, some separations are permanent. If your dog misses someone who has passed away, he will mourn the loss. Try offering an item of clothing with his loved one’s scent. Sleeping with this item should provide comfort while your dog adjusts to life without his friend. Some dogs find themselves in a new home due to the death of their owner. When this occurs, it’s a very confusing and sad time for the dog. In addition to grieving, he has to adjust to a new environment, schedule and rules. To help with this adjustment, try to maintain his original meal and walk schedule at first if you know it; you can gradually make any major changes necessary.

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Caring for Rescued or Abused Dogs

By Eliza Wynn

Animal lovers who have adopted an abused or rescued dog know it’s one of the most rewarding things they’ve ever done. It can also be hard for first-time adopters to figure out how to make things easier for themselves and their new companions. These dogs have been through a lot, and their experiences often make them hesitant to trust people again. It’s up to the adopters to help them adjust to their new life as part of a loving family. With that in mind, here are some tips for caring for rescued or abused dogs that will help them feel safe, confident and loved.

Supply Run

Not having essential supplies when you need them is stressful, and pets pick up on that stress. Before bringing your new family member home, be prepared for the inevitable messes by having pet-safe cleaning supplies on hand. Other important items include puppy pads, grooming and first-aid supplies, chew toys, CANIDAE dog food, and a leash and collar. By preparing in advance, you’ll be more likely to stay calm when things don’t go as planned.

Home Vet Visit

As a responsible pet owner, you’ll want to have your dog’s health checked out right away. If possible, arrange to have a trusted veterinarian provide the initial exam at your home. Once your dog realizes that this new person is a friend, you can schedule future visits at the veterinary clinic.

Use a Gentle Tone

Use a gentle tone of voice whenever your dog is nearby, and always speak his name kindly. Loud voices and harsh words can be frightening, especially to a dog that’s already anxious or fearful. Use praise when appropriate, occasionally supplemented with a CANIDAE dog treat. Sing to him softly, and if this has a soothing effect, use the same song whenever he needs some extra TLC.

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