Category Archives: exercise

Fun Activities for High Energy Dogs

high energy dogs carterseBy Laurie Darroch

Highly energetic dogs need ways to channel all their excess energy. Otherwise, they might find more destructive ways to use up their energy, such as destroying your belongings. It’s a good idea to have a variety of fun activities that will help them burn off energy in healthy and productive ways, while keeping their mind stimulated.

Chasing and Fetching

Play active games in the yard or park with your dog. If you have enough space in your home, you can play more subdued forms of these games inside.

Balls are always a favorite toy for high energy dogs; just be sure to get one that is the right size for your dog. A small dog may not be able to handle a large ball and will give up on the activity. A large dog can choke on a ball that is too small. With training, some dogs can even play a dog form of soccer with large balls.

Flying discs such as the classic Frisbee is another favorite. This is a perfect activity for a high energy dog. If trained properly, the activity can even be competitive with other dogs and owners. Running, leaping and learning to catch and return the disc is not only great for an active dog, but a lot of fun for you as well.

Your dog might find bubbles fun and fascinating.  You can use the simple bubble wands that release one or two bubbles at a time, or a battery operated bubble blower that shoots multiple bubbles at once to really get your dog running and leaping. Your high energy dog will have a really good time chasing them all over the yard and popping them. Because your dog will catch the bubbles in their mouth, use only non-toxic bubble solution, or make your own safe bubble solution at home.

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How Much Exercise Do Dogs Need Each Day?

By Linda Cole

We know it’s important to make sure our dogs get proper exercise to help maintain their weight and overall health, and provide mental stimulation. Every dog, regardless of size, needs a chance to stretch their legs every day, but how much exercise is enough? Breed does make a difference in the amount of exercise needed, and a dog that isn’t given a chance to get rid of pent up energy can develop bad behaviors.

Before beginning any strenuous activities, you should have your vet give your dog a checkup to make sure he’s up to a more physical workout. Each dog is an individual and it’s important to create an exercise routine that takes into account breed, age and physical condition. Old or current injuries, weather conditions and the amount of exercise needed should also be considered when it comes to daily exercise.

You can encourage your dog to play with other dogs at the dog park, or learn how to do agility or other dog sports, but you should never force him to do something he isn’t interested in doing. The amount of daily exercise should be based on what a dog was bred to do. That’s one reason why it’s helpful having a general idea of which breeds make up your mixed breed dog.

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How to Make Walking Your Dog More Fun

By Linda Cole

Keeping your dog on a routine is important. Canines like to know what’s going to happen throughout the day. I guess that makes it easier for them to plan out their busy schedule of chasing the cat, barking at the mailman and wolfing down their tasty CANIDAE food. The daily walk is an important part of your dog’s routine, but it can become a bit boring if you do the same thing every day. It’s good to spice it up now and then, to make it more fun for both of you.

Change the Pace

Many dogs enjoy getting out for a run, and jogging is a good way to build endurance and burn off calories. However, jogging isn’t for everyone or every dog. You can still mix up your pace and walk faster or slower, and in doing so you establish yourself as the leader by controlling the speed. Quickly changing directions helps to teach your dog to pay attention to you. Mixing up both speed and direction can make a walk even more stimulating.

Have Alternate Routes

A walk is not nearly as interesting when you see the same things day in and day out. Varying your route gives you different sights, smells and sounds that enrich the senses of both you and your dog. A nature trail offers different stimulation than a walk around the neighborhood. If you don’t have a trail close by, you can always drive to a nearby park or trail. When you walk out the door with your dog, he will look to you to see what’s going to happen next. Anticipation is part of the fun.

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Six Tips to Soothe an Anxious Dog

By Laurie Darroch

Like human beings, dogs react to stressful situations. Dogs show their anxiety through altered behavior, by becoming clingy, acting out, or even withdrawing. Unlike human beings though, dogs cannot express their anxiety in the verbal ways we do. It is up to a responsible pet owner to pay attention to the physical and behavioral cues their dog exhibits, and respond accordingly to help their dog calm down and deal with the situation that is giving them stress and anxiety.


Touch and contact helps both humans and dogs relieve anxiety, fear and stress. When a dog feels cut off from their human, their anxiety level is likely to increase. If they are hurting physically, just being close to you may help keep them calmer. Petting and cuddling your dog will help take away some of the anxiety.

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5 Good Reasons to Take a Dog for a Walk

By Laurie Darroch

Although taking a dog for a walk is a good way for both of you to get some exercise, there are additional reasons to get out of the house for a stroll.

Stress Reduction

Humans and dogs both react to stressful events in their lives, and also to stressful people. A dog does not always know how to release that stress and anxiety. They also react to your stress and may show it in destructive or odd behavioral ways. No matter how big or small the stress is, it is important to utilize ways to reduce or even eliminate it in healthy ways.

A walk gives both you and the dog a physical and mental outlet for some of the stress. Going out to see and focus on other things besides what is causing stress or anxiety is a healthy way to get your minds and senses on other things for awhile.

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Do Different Dogs Have Different Exercise Needs?

By Langley Cornwell

When we adopted our shy, fearful pup, we learned that one of the things which would be vital for her is to have a solid routine she could count on that included plenty of exercise. We have done a fairly good job in this area, especially the exercise part, and it has helped her with some of her quirky behavior.

Dogs that are well-adjusted need real exercise too. Access to a large backyard doesn’t count as exercise; most dogs just find a sunny spot where they can lounge. And for some dogs, a few short walks around the block may not be enough. Different dogs do have different exercise needs and as a responsible pet owner, it’s important to know what your dog needs so he can thrive.

Lack of Exercise

If a dog isn’t exercised enough, bad behaviors may arise, including destroying things in your house. Early on, our dog had a penchant for shoes, which was a real drag. We had to remember to keep our closet door shut at all times. I’ve known dogs that have destroyed furniture, and my husband claims he once had a dog that chewed through drywall. Other examples of bad behavior include jumping on people, obsessively begging for attention or asking for playtime, digging, running around and excessively barking. Neurotic tendencies can develop as well, including self-licking or chasing their own tail.

When your dog resorts to behaviors like this, he isn’t trying to annoy you. The destructive behaviors are entertaining to him. He is just releasing pent-up energy that he didn’t have an opportunity to release in a more human-friendly manner.

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