Category Archives: Felidae cat food

5 Ways I Want to Be More Like My Cats

By Julia Williams

Hardly a day goes by that I don’t see my cats basking in a sun puddle and think, “Why can’t I be a cat for just one day?” I would get caught up on my sleep, that’s for sure. I’d have zero stress because I would not stir all day long, except to follow that warm sun puddle when it moves. I wouldn’t worry about where my next meal is coming from or if it’s going to taste good. Everything I could possibly need would be provided for me by my human servant. Which means, of course, that I wouldn’t have a care in the world…unless you count making sure the servant got out of bed when I said it was time for breakfast and not when the clock said.

Yes, my cats have a great life. And I admit … I am jealous! I want to experience catdom for myself because frankly, I don’t think my kitties appreciate just how good they have it! Being human, I know they have it good, and I want some of what they’re having. It seems only fair. But alas, all I can do is dream.

Here are 5 ways I want to be more like my cats:

1. Embrace every opportunity, even those that turn out differently than expected. 

Cats go with the flow, and they don’t get upset when things don’t happen the way they thought they would. They just adapt. Take Mickey, for example: he loves Cheetos, so I’ll share one with him occasionally. One day I left an open bag of Jalapeno Cheddar Cheetos on the couch while I went to get something from the kitchen. Now, if you’ve ever had those, you know they have quite a “kick.” He didn’t know; he stole one out of the bag, and ate the whole thing! Sure, it wasn’t the mild, cheesy Cheeto he was expecting, but Mickey didn’t let a little Jalapeno spice keep him from enjoying his stolen snack. (He did, however, drink a lot of water afterwards!).

2. Enjoy the simple things life offers.

Cats have a unique ability to find joy in everything, no matter how mundane it might seem. If it moves, chase it. That feather’s not a real bird? No problem! If a paper bag magically appears on the floor, turn it into a mancat cave/tactile toy. A cardboard box or a wicker basket is an open invitation for a nap. Pens become projectiles, magazines become chew toys, and every little thing lying around becomes something fun to play with.

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4 Year Blogiversary Bash and a Giveaway!

By Julia Williams

Bow wow WOW! It’s been four years since CANIDAE began the Responsible Pet Ownership blog, and what a ride it’s been. Let’s pop a cork and have a PAWTY!

I’ve been Editor of the RPO blog for nearly all of that time, and I’ve watched it grow and evolve to become something better than I ever imagined. Blogging has been around for awhile now, but in many ways is still in its infancy, and there’s so much yet to discover.

I can’t wait to see what the next four years has in store for this blog, as well as for all of the other pet blogs and bloggers I’ve come to know and love. Social media is a unique sign of the times; unless you have a fairly new dictionary, you won’t find the terms “blog” and “blogging” in there. And yet, blogs have become a part of daily life for many of us. Whether we read blogs, write blogs or do some of both, it’s hard to imagine them not being there.

CANIDAE began this blog with a few simple but heartfelt goals – to connect with customers, make new friends, share interesting and fun stories, and impart knowledge to help people be the best “pet parents” they can be.

Four years and nearly 2,000 posts later, I’m happy to say these goals have all been met, and so much more. Responsible pet ownership is at the heart of everything this blog stands for and strives to accomplish. It’s the cornerstone of the CANIDAE brand as well as the philosophy of all who work for the company.

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Cat Chat: Text Abbreviations for Tech-Savvy Felines

By Julia Williams

The advent of computers and cell phones spawned a new way of communicating for many people. Words and phrases became abbreviated to save time while typing in chat rooms, online forums, mobile text messages and on Facebook. Chat abbreviations have become so commonplace that most of us know what LOL, BRB, TMI, ETA, IDK, OMG and BFF mean. However, I saw a text abbreviation recently that stumped me, so I did what I always do nowadays when I need information – I googled it. Paydirt! I not only found the one that had baffled me, but a comprehensive A to Z list that blew me away. Who knew there were thousands of text abbreviations just waiting to make our lives easier by shaving two seconds off our typing time? Wut?

Naturally, that got me to thinking about texting abbreviations cats would use in their everyday communications with other cats (and perhaps even a stray human or two). Never mind the lack of opposable thumbs. Plenty of cat crazy people are willing to buy into the fantasy that felines are capable of typing. Why wouldn’t cats want to save precious time by using text abbreviations? After all, that leaves more time for what is really important to kittehs – such as, eatin’ a big bowl of FELIDAE cat food, then settling down for a long nap as only a cat can do.

As responsible pet owners, we should be keeping tabs on Tabby while she’s online and especially when she’s texting that Tomcat hotty who has a reputation for wooing every ladycat within hissing distance. To make it easy for you, I spied on my own wily felines and compiled a list of all the texting lingo that tech-savvy cats use.

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What Makes a Cat’s Coat Change Colors?

By Linda Cole

When I was in high school, my family had a Siamese cat. She had a beautiful light colored coat with chocolate brown markings on her face, tail and legs. As she aged, however, her coat began to darken up. Three of my cats are black, but I’ve noticed one has a reddish tint starting to show up in his coat. If you have a cat with a darker coat, and have noticed a change in the color, there are reasons why the coat color may be changing.

Sun Exposure 

My cats love to lie in the sun. Since they’re all inside cats, I find some stretched out in warm puddles of sunlight entering through a window. As a sun puddle ebbs across the floor, the cats move with it. I can usually find a cat lying in an opened window enjoying an afternoon sunbathing as they spy on the neighbors. Jabbers is my biggest cat and always makes sure he gets a window spot, but his black coat has gotten a red tint to it from lying in the sun. Cats with dark coat colors who spend too much time in the sun can start to get a bleached out look from too much exposure to the sun. The darker colored coats of outside cats who spend a lot of their time in the sun can also have their coats fade in time due to sun exposure.

Temperature 

The coat color of oriental breeds like the Himalayan and Siamese are determined by temperature. More precisely, the temperature of their skin. Himalayan kittens begin life with an almost creamy colored coat. Siamese kittens are born white. As they begin to grow, color changes begin to take place in their coats and the points begin to emerge. Because the neck and body of the cat is warmer, their coat stays a lighter color and the tail, legs, face and ears turn darker because those areas of the skin are cooler. Air temperature can also play a role in coat color and their points can darken or become lighter depending on the season. A change in coat color can also indicate that your Siamese or Himalayan cat is sick and has a higher than normal temperature.

The Aging Process

Just like us, our precious kitties can begin to get gray hairs mixed in with their coat as they age. It’s harder for us to see hairs losing their pigmentation on lighter colored cats, but you may notice a change in their coat color the older they get. One of my cats, Scooter, had just turned twenty a few months before she crossed over the Rainbow Bridge. She had a striking gray coat that faded into white on her chest and stomach. Bits of gray around her mouth began to whiten the older she got. It’s a reminder to never take for granted the unconditional love we get from our pets and to give them an extra hug at night, in the morning and any other chance you get.

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An Itchy Kitty Gets a New Lease on Life & Fabulous Fur

By Guido the Italian Kitty

Catzowey! I’m itching to tell you about my itches that have gone arrivederci and bye bye too, and you must believes it cuz itza for sure my fur is more meowvalous and shiny than ever in all a cat’s 9 lives. And it’s not cuz I went to the deeziner fur salon and had a makeover! But I would purr to let you in on a giganticat secret.

For the first 4 years of my catzowey life, I was itching. Yep, just itching and scratching and biting my handsome man-cat fur like gnawing on myself. It was not so comfy having to live like this and strike a pose on the catwalk at the same time! My photo shoots were done around not showing my itchy tummy cuz I itched so much that I ate all of my EyeTailYun tummy fur right off of my bod. And like that’s not a furry worry, then I started on taking all the furs off of my famous legs. CATZOWEY! When I looked into the mirror, I didn’t see my EyeTailYun buffed self but instead saw what I thought was a long lost scraggly relative! Catzowey, it was me looking half naked from biting off my handsome fur coat.

Oh sure, I visited abundacat dreaded V E T persons – more than I want to remember and they all said “he needs allergy tests.”  Then most of them said I was probably having an environmental reaction! Holy Cannoli – like I’m allergic to my sofa?

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Do Groups of Cats Form a Hierarchical Family?

By Langley Cornwell

Our cat and our dog are completely bonded, with one another and with us. I’ve had dogs all my life but this is my first cat. As such, I’d never had the opportunity to observe feline behavior; the only thing I knew about cats was what I’d been told. One thing I heard over and over was how independent cats are. Sure, they are socially quite different than dogs but still, our cat loves his family time. He and his sister (the dog) play together, hang out together and even sleep together. The cat follows right along on our dog walks, which keeps the neighbors laughing. He’s an indoor/outdoor cat and enjoys his time patrolling the neighborhood, but whenever we come out for dog walks, he magically appears by our side and trots right along.

I certainly wouldn’t classify our cat as the independent type. I’ve always attributed his loving, bonding nature to the fact that we rescued him at a tender age (he wasn’t properly weaned). Moreover, we rescued our dog at the same time, so they were raised right alongside one another. We think both of our animals have a bit of species confusion; our dog digs a hole before she eliminates, but that’s a different article entirely.

Several years ago an older male cat named Jack moved into the neighborhood. It wasn’t long before the two cats were best friends. They hang out on one another’s front porch. They wait at each other’s door if the other one isn’t out yet – just like kids who go to their friend’s house to see if ‘Johnny can come out and play.’ It’s gotten to the point where Jack likes to hang out in our house and vice-versa. My cat and Jack have even shared a meal or two, especially now that I have Jack’s guardian feeding him FELIDAE cat food. Jack’s human companion is absolutely amazed, because until they moved into our neighborhood, Jack had always been a solitary cat. She says he used to get into ferocious cat fights in their old neighborhood. Not here, Jack and my cat are tight.

Where is all the aloof, standoffish behavior I’d been told of? I thought cats were not a social species, but my observations (granted, of a very small sample size) made me think otherwise. I started wondering: do cats form social bonds? Do groups of cats form a hierarchal structure?

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