Category Archives: foods dogs should not eat

How to Make Holidays Special for Your Pet

By Linda Cole

Thanksgiving and Christmas are fast approaching. There’s cooking, baking and shopping that needs to be done before we can relax and enjoy the holiday season with our family and friends. With all the running around to buy groceries, decorations and presents, and making sure everything is in order, some pets can feel a little left out. Your focus may not be on them as much as usual, but you can still make the holidays special for your pet without a lot of expense. Here are some suggestions:

Maintain their daily schedule

With all of the hustle and bustle before and during the holidays, your pet’s daily routine can be disrupted. However, deviating from a pet’s feeding schedule, walks and even playtime can cause them to become anxious. They like to know what’s next and they don’t like change, so keep their daily routine as regular as possible.

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Should You Take a (Non-Service) Dog to a Wedding?

By Tamara McRill

Naturally, we would like to have our canine companions present at all of life’s major events, but does this include weddings? With two exceptions, there isn’t an easy answer, whether you’re the bride and groom or a guest. If you’re thoughtful and ask questions the answer shouldn’t be too hard to come up with.

Here are some questions to ask and issues to think over before bringing your dog to a wedding:

Ask the Bride and Groom

This is your first stop on your way to seeing if your dog can be your plus one. It also happens to be the easiest way to find out if your dog would be welcome at the nuptials. If the bride or groom say no, then that’s your answer. Don’t try to pressure them otherwise—it’s their special day.

Does the Venue Allow Dogs?

The second easiest way to discover if your non-service animal can attend the ceremony or reception is to ask if the venue allows animals. Most inside facilities—and some outdoor ones—don’t allow pets on the premises. So even if the bride gives you the green light, make sure to check. She’ll have enough on her plate with the planning.

Check the Guests

Is anyone on the guest list allergic or afraid of dogs? If so, then it might be best to leave your dog at home or in the hotel room. You don’t want to not ask and have the groom’s sister bring things to a halt by having an allergy induced asthma attack or some other scenario. Again, the spotlight should be on the couple and not any distress inadvertently caused by your pet.

Friendly and Trained?

Has your dog been taught to sit quietly among a group of strangers? Don’t guess or risk it with a dog that has never been in that kind of situation. Even if your dog is well-behaved, they may still be affected by all the excitement and get antsy.

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Human Food that’s Deadly for Pets

By Linda Cole

If you want a pet to pay attention to you, make yourself something to eat. Some pet owners don’t think twice about tossing their dog or cat a bite of human food, but giving them the wrong food can be deadly for them. With Christmas and New Year’s comes extra food sitting around for pets to discover when no one’s watching.

As responsible pet owners, I’m sure most of you know that some human food can be extremely dangerous for your pets. However, it’s always worth putting out a reminder when holiday plans and family gatherings can take our attention away from our pets. This list is by no means a complete list of human food pets shouldn’t eat. Keep your pet safe by making sure they don’t have access to food sitting out that’s meant for company, and make sure guests don’t toss your begging pet a “treat.”


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Giving a Pet for Christmas? Santa Says No


By Linda Cole

Adding a pet to a home anytime during the year is great, but careful consideration should be taken before surprising your kids or anyone else with a new pet as a Christmas gift. Giving a pet for Christmas may seem like a wonderful idea at the time, but pets don’t always make good gifts. Here are five reasons why Santa says “No” to pets as Christmas presents.

No time for proper bonding

Christmas is the one of the busiest times of the year, and a new pet needs attention right away to bond with their new owner. If the bonding process is neglected during those first few days, the new puppy or kitten is more likely to form a relationship with the one who feeds them and attends to their needs instead of their intended owner. Plus, getting a pet for Christmas along with all the new toys and games Santa will leave under the tree can be overwhelming for children. Kids can quickly lose interest in a new pet after the initial surprise.

Insecurity

Giving a pet for Christmas can create an insecure pet. New puppies and kittens need to learn rules, and it’s hard to give them the attention they need in a busy home. With family and friends coming and going, a new pet may have trouble learning who is in charge. There are so many unfamiliar smells in a new pet’s environment that he may feel lost and uncomfortable. Insecurity can lead to behavioral problems later on, so it’s important to help new pets, especially puppies, learn who their pack leader is.

Other pets already in the home

Giving a pet for Christmas adds more tension to an already busy household, especially when there is no time to properly introduce a new member who most likely will not be welcomed by other pets. Dogs and cats are territorial and are not eager to share their space with a newcomer. Kittens and puppies may not understand the social hierarchy in their new family and if you don’t help a new pet learn proper socializing, the older cat or dog will give them a lesson of their own. Some little spats are to be expected, but outright aggression can leave a new pet hurt, frightened and harder to socialize with the other pets.

It’s easy to forget that a new pet is in the house

During the holidays, we generally have more food sitting around for guests to munch on. Alcoholic drinks, chocolate candy, raisins, nuts and other food items can be deadly for pets. Plus there are electrical cords to chew on and play with, tree ornaments and tinsel, all of which can be extremely dangerous to pets. An emergency trip to the vet can dampen any holiday festivities. It’s not easy keeping an eye on pets when you’re used to them in the house and even harder when the pet is new. An opened door as guests arrive can leave an exploring puppy or kitten out in the cold and lost. Refrigerator doors, cabinet doors or basement steps can all be harmful to a pet if you forget to watch out for them.

There’s an emotional connection that comes with selecting a pet

Most pet owners can’t tell you why they picked the pet they have. It may have been a look, a little yap or an outstretched paw catching an arm as a cage was passed. An emotional bond begins when you first see the dog or cat you will eventually take home. Choosing a pet is personal for most people and that’s why giving a pet for Christmas isn’t always a good idea.

If you want to give someone a pet for Christmas, a good alternative would be to buy them a gift certificate with a responsible breeder or make arrangements with a local shelter for an appointment after the holidays. This allows the person receiving your gift the opportunity and fun of picking out a new pet themselves. If you already purchased or adopted a pet, most breeders or shelters are happy to hold it until after the holidays when the new owner and pet have adequate time to properly bond. A picture of a new pet wrapped up gives someone, especially a child, something to look forward to after the holidays when life has returned to normal.

As far as I’m concerned, a pet is the best gift in the world to get. However, unless you are absolutely certain that the person receiving this heartwarming present really wants the responsibility of caring for a pet, it’s best to not give a pet as a gift. Surprises are great, but giving a pet for Christmas may be a little more of a surprise than someone was expecting, and it may not be appreciated.

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The personal opinions and/or use of trade, corporate or brand names, is for information and convenience only. Such use does not constitute an endorsement by CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods of any product or service. Opinions are those of the individual authors and not necessarily of CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods.