Category Archives: high quality dog food

How to Care for Multiple Dogs by Yourself

By Langley Cornwell

There was a long period in my life when I lived with three dogs – two lab mixes and a German shepherd – and I was single. On top of that, I maintained my household and had a full time job. I don’t think that’s particularly special, it’s just what I did. If you fast forward the movie of my life to the present day, however, you will see a decidedly different picture. I now share my home with two dogs, a cat and a husband. The major difference is that I now have help caring for our pack. In fact, the truth is that I help my husband take care of our pack; an objective observer would probably deem him the primary caregiver for our four-legged friends.

The point is, I’ve had it both ways. I’ve been solely responsible for taking care of multiple dogs and I’ve shared the responsibility with another pack leader. Obviously, it takes more work to care for multiple dogs by yourself, but it shouldn’t be overwhelming. During my tenure as the single caregiver, I learned some tricks for maintaining a calm, stable household for myself and my canine companions.

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Tips on Choosing a Dog from a Shelter

By Langley Cornwell

Yesterday Linda Cole offered advice on how to choose a reputable breeder if you decide to adopt a purebred dog. Today I want to talk about rescue dogs and how to find the right shelter dog if you decide to go that route.

All but one of my dogs was rescued in some form or fashion; most came from shelters. I can remember going there as a kid. We’d walk up and down the aisles, peer into all those hopeful eyes and try to decide which pup would be our next family pet. I think I have a knack for choosing a dog from the shelter. All the dogs that have come home with me have been healthy, loving, life-long companions. Even so, it’s wise to follow basic guidelines for choosing a dog from a shelter.

Before You Go

Remember that sharing your life with a dog is a huge responsibility. Once you’ve determined you’re ready to take on this commitment, you should narrow down your choices. Are you looking for a puppy, an adolescent dog or a senior? Do you want a small dog, a medium sized dog or a big dog (when fully grown)? Are you prepared to walk the dog and feed him a high quality dog food like CANIDAE?

Do you have a specific breed type in mind? Shelters are filled with both mixed breed and pure breed dogs. If your heart is set on a specific type of dog and you can’t find one at a local shelter, you can always contact breed-specific rescue organizations for help. Critically and realistically evaluate your lifestyle to figure out what type of dog will be the best fit.

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How to Stop Your Dog from Marking His Territory Inside

By Langley Cornwell

A dog marking his territory is not something that should surprise us. It is a perfectly normal behavior for a dog to want to claim what he perceives as his. This is not a problem unless the dog is marking inside, or if aggression is involved. If a dog is marking inside the home, then you’ve got several problems on your hand, one of which is a serious odor issue.

There can be several factors at work here, and finding out what’s motivating the dog to mark is vital to solving the problem. Most commonly, a marking dog is letting us know that he is feeling insecure about something. He might perceive that there’s an intrusion on his personal space, his family, his home or his yard. He might even be feeling anxious over a toy or area that he uses regularly. If he thinks it is his, he might mark it.

What exactly is marking anyway?

In literal terms, marking is the act of urinating on an area. In doggie terms it is all about leaving a scent so that other canines will understand that they must leave it alone. Marking is a communication tool that is quite handy in the wild…but not so much around your living room. Marking can leave horrible stains and odors all over your home, and it is not the most sanitary thing either. Dogs that mark don’t generally urinate completely, but the trace amounts can still destroy your property.

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Which Dog Breeds Live The Longest?

By Langley Cornwell

Owning a dog is one of the most rewarding experiences in life, and picking the right one is important. There are countless things to consider when finding a breed – such as size, temperament, intelligence and space available. It’s also a good idea to take your lifestyle and the dog breed’s activity requirements into consideration. All of these things are important, but one important factor often gets overlooked: how long will the dog live?

Dogs are pretty resilient. If you adopt a young dog, your pet will likely be a part of your life for many years. Still, the sad fact is that a dog will generally not live as long as we do. With that said, you might be interested in knowing that different breeds have different life expectancies.

What makes a particular breed live longer?

According to webMD, dogs that generally live longer are small dogs, and the smaller they are when fully grown, the longer they tend to live. The converse holds true as well; the bigger the breed, the shorter the lifespan. Giant breeds are the shortest lived. It appears that weight is the key factor and not height, however. Bigger, heavier dog breeds tend to die at about the eight year mark. Smaller dogs can live in excess of fifteen years.

Bear in mind that particular breeds sometimes have breed-specific health issues. For example, Cocker Spaniels often have eye and ear infections, while Labrador Retrievers are known for having a high cancer incidence. In fact, my Lab did have a cancerous lump when she was young but they removed it with plenty of healthy margin and it never came back.

There are countless other instances of breed-specific health problems but still, the number one thing to look out for is weight. Larger dogs, ones weighing over a hundred pounds, will be considered quite elderly at about seven or eight years.

Female dogs typically tend to live longer than male dogs, but the difference is negligible. Mixed breeds are usually longer living than pure bred dogs, so be sure to keep that in mind when choosing what kind of dog to get.

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Dog Breed Profile: The Intelligent and Adorable Pumi

By Suzanne Alicie

There are some dogs that, when they look at you, their personality just shines from their face. This is true of the Pumi. If you’re looking for an adorable fur baby that is loyal and fun, then look no further. If you want a dog that is intelligent, eager to please and excels in agility and working tasks, then a Pumi also fits that description. This is a truly well rounded breed that makes an excellent pet and a great working dog. Since I’m not a very active person, I’m pretty sure it’s a good thing I’ve only seen photos of the Pumi breed, because I know that if I looked into one of those lovable, expressive faces I would want to take the dog home!

The Pumi is a Hungarian herding breed that originated in the 17th and 18th centuries as an adapted version of the ancestral Puli breed. These dogs were used to herd farm animals including sheep, goats and pigs. They were very versatile and intelligent on the job, being equally useful for gathering, driving and keeping stock within boundaries.

Not a large dog, the Pumi is a square shaped breed, meaning that the height at the withers is the same as the distance from the prosternum to the buttocks. They are typically between 15 to 18 inches tall and weigh between 22 to 29 pounds, with the males being on the larger end of these ranges.

The Pumi has been recorded in the Foundation Stock Service classification since 2001, but the breed has been recognized around the world as show dogs, agility dogs and working dogs for many years.

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Can you take your Dog on Public Transportation?

By Langley Cornwell

As the economy continues to evolve, there have been some notable changes to the transportation industry. More and more Americans are switching to smaller cars, and sales of hybrid automobiles are on a steep upward trend. Families that used to be two-car households are figuring out creative ways to drop down to one car and eliminate the inflated cost of gasoline, property taxes, maintenance, etc. for that second car.

As a response, public transportation is taking on a more important role in the new American lifestyle. We have a long way to go to catch up with many of the countries in the European Union, but I’ve seen giant strides even in the small southern town where I live now.

Fortunately, some trains, buses, trolleys and light rails now allow pets. Be aware, however, that there are still many restrictions for this method of transportation when your travel companion walks on four legs. At this time, people that plan to have their pet accompany them must avoid Amtrak and Greyhound; neither carrier allows animals on its trains and buses.

Other than avoiding Amtrak and Greyhound, there are no standard guidelines to follow when determining whether a certain train, trolley or light rail system will allow pets and, if they do, what their rules and regulations are. Before making your plans, check for updates and new information regarding which carrier in your area of travel allows pets and what restrictions apply.

If you’ve determined that pets are allowed to travel with you on public transportation, make sure you both adhere to good travel etiquette. Here are some tips:

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