Category Archives: Langley Cornwell

Tips to Curb Puppy Biting and Aggression

puppy biting airbeagleBy Langley Cornwell

Puppies are curious. Much like infants, they spend a lot of time and energy  investigating the world around them via their mouths. When they are small, it’s fairly easy to dodge the needle-sharp teeth. Some people even think it’s cute when a puppy gets all mouthy. It may be cute in puppies but make no mistake about it; you need to stop these early signs of aggression before that innocent little puppy grows into an adult dog, or you will regret it.

This mouthy behavior starts early. In the litter, puppies bite in a playful way to establish hierarchy. They snap and nip each other to test their strength and assert their dominance. When they are weaned from their mother and separated from their litter mates, it’s natural for puppies to take this behavior with them. So when you’re cuddling and cooing over the newest member of your household, beware – you may get a sharp nip on the tip of your nose.

While the biting may seem harmless, it can escalate into real aggression as the puppy becomes bolder. That’s why it’s necessary to teach your dog to curb this behavior early on. Here are some tips and tricks that will help.

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How to Choose the Right Collar and Lead for Your Dog

collar maja dumatBy Langley Cornwell

Using the right dog collar and lead is important. It’s a tool you probably utilize every day when you take your pup out of the house; it’s required by law in most areas. And if your dogs are anything like mine, it’s the one thing (besides their CANIDAE dog food!) they have the biggest reaction to. When I pull out their leashes, it’s on. The house is filled with doggie happiness.

Choosing the right products are confusing, though. I remember a time when there weren’t so many options. Basic collars and leashes were the only things on the market, and the only choices you had were color and pattern. Times have changed and now there are so many options it can be overwhelming. Even more confusing—everyone has a strong opinion about what is “best.” With all the options and opinions out there, how do you decide?

Like most things, it depends on your purpose and your dog. Here are a few useful options on the market today.

Basic Collar and Leash

The basic collar fits comfortably around your dog’s neck and either buckles or snaps together. The basic leash is usually flat, 6-feet long and made of woven cotton or nylon. Regardless of the type of dog collar and lead you use on a daily basis, it’s good to have a basic set on hand. The basic leash is useful because of its versatility. Aside from the ability to walk your dog with it, in an emergency situation you can make a slip lead or a muzzle out of it.

This combination is best for calm, easygoing dogs without obedience problems. The basic collar and leash are not helpful for training purposes, so if that’s what you need, keep reading.

Snap-around Collar or Slip Lead

For dogs that require a few corrections along the walk, many experts recommend either a snap-around collar or a slip lead. These tools work great if your dog is easily distracted by joggers, bicyclers, squirrels, other dogs, etc., because the collar allows for quick corrections.

The snap-around collar can be fitted for your particular dog, while a slip lead is generic. Used correctly, a snap-around collar should fit high on your dog’s neck, just below her ears. It should be snug but not tight. On the other hand, slip leads are easy to put on and can be used for any size dog. Try both options and see which one you and your dog respond the best to.

With either a snap-around collar or slip lead, you must be cautious. These options should only be used for training purposes and not as your dog’s regular collar or lead.

collar kimberly gauthierHarness and Flat Lead

A harness and flat lead are the best option for brachycephalic dogs: Pugs, Boston Terriers, Pekingese, Boxers, Bulldogs, Shih Tzus and other breeds with pushed-in faces. They are also recommended for dog breeds that are likely to have throat or trachea problems like Pomeranians, and dogs with long, slender necks, like Greyhounds.

A standard harness that rubs between a dog’s front legs can stimulate her instinct to pull, which is good if you want your dog to pull you while you skate or ride your bike. If that’s not your goal, then look for a harness with a non-pull design which goes high around her chest and behind her front legs (instead of between her legs).

These are just some of the hundreds of the collar and lead options available today. You may have to try a few different types before you settle on what works best. In all cases, the leash and collar are important communication vehicles between you and your four-legged friend, and should be used with love and respect. For safety’s sake, when you are not training your dog make sure she has on a standard collar with ID tags attached.

What about you? Please tell us what’s your favorite dog collar and leash, and why?

Top photo by Maja Dumat
Bottom photo by Kimberly Gauthier

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Three Unusual Cat Breeds

By Langley Cornwell

One of the biggest time drains I’m faced with on a daily basis is the trap of looking at cat photos on social media sites. Not surprisingly, most of my connections are animal lovers. They post loads of pictures of their cats being precious and, no matter how many deadlines I have looming, I cannot turn away. It’s like the Siren Song. And yes, I’ll admit it; I’m just as guilty as my friends. If I didn’t exercise some restraint, I’d post multiple pictures of our kitty all throughout the day. I just want everybody to see how darn cute he is when he’s lying on a pile of laundry or hiding in a box or opening a drawer or smoking a catnip cigar or snuggling with our dogs or… oh, sorry. I get carried away.

So, the other day I was sucked into the cat-viewing vortex when I came upon a friend’s photo of a cat she was fostering. This little guy is the weirdest looking cat I’ve ever seen. We tried to identify what breed combination he is but came up short. During this exercise I did learn that there are less than a hundred cat breeds in existence, and the Cat Fanciers’ Association only recognizes 40 breeds officially. Of those 40 different breeds, most of them look fairly similar.

There are a handful of cat breeds, however, that don’t look like other cats. Through genetic mutations and selective breeding, some of these cats have turned out rather odd-looking. Here are three of the most unusual.

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Urban Dog Etiquette: Living with Dogs in a Metropolitan Area

urban rodriguezBy Langley Cornwell

My cousin and her family live in New York City with a completely spoiled Lab; they are crazy about their dog and treat her like a third child. The dog gets the best of everything including her own bedroom, visits to the doggie spa and premium quality CANIDAE Grain Free PURE dog food. Having always lived in a more suburban area, I couldn’t imagine how they properly managed life with a large dog in the heart of the Big Apple. However, if you’ve ever spent time in congested urban areas, you know that tight living space does not lessen the desire for canine companionship. So my cousin, and many others, meets the challenges of living with dogs in highly populated areas with grace and smarts. Here are some basic etiquette rules they follow.

Reinforce Basic Commands

At a minimum, city dogs must follow a number of basic commands promptly and precisely in order to get around safely. Of special importance are the come, sit/stay, heel and leave it commands. In a bustling city, there are many distractions that can be hazardous to your dog’s safety if she’s not responsive to commands. Waiting for the stoplight to change is much easier and safer when your pooch is calmly in a sit/stay by your side.

Pets may get nervous when confronted with rambunctious children, loud noises, blaring car horns, etc. The heel and leave it commands are especially helpful in preventing your pet from chasing bicycles, in-line skaters or skateboarders. At any time, you may be thrust into situations that demand swift and thorough control of your dog to prevent problems. A firm grasp of basic commands is necessary for city-dwelling dogs.
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How to Stop Dogs from Licking Their Wounds

dog wound Ewen RobertsBy Langley Cornwell

Some people believe an old wives tale that it’s okay for a dog to lick his wound because his saliva has antibacterial abilities. Because of this, they let their pet tend to their own cut or puncture and then wonder why the wound is getting worse instead of better. It is true that a canine’s saliva has trace amounts of antibacterial properties, but not enough to heal a wound. In fact, incessant licking will impede the natural healing process and even further damage a pet’s wound.

The reason a dog licks his wound in the first place is because it temporarily blocks the pain receptors. It’s like when you bonk your head and then rub it. At first the rubbing makes the localized pain—where you hit your head—feel better. That’s what licking does.

The act of licking wounds traces back to domesticated dog’s ancestors. Wild and feral dogs licked their wounds to clean out any debris. Additionally, as mentioned, dog saliva does have a slight antibacterial benefit. But wild dogs were so busy avoiding predators and feeding the pack that they weren’t able to lick their wound endlessly. Domesticated dogs, on the other hand, have plenty of time on their hands (paws?). If left to their own devices, they could spend all day licking and fussing over a wound. Thus starts a cycle; licking makes the wound worse so the dog licks more, which makes the wound worse, which prompts more licking. You get the point.

Because of this unhelpful and perhaps harmful cycle, it’s important to block your dog’s access to his wound. Here are a few suggestions.
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Preventing and Treating Canine Diabetes

diabetes daily inventionBy Langley Cornwell

The diabetes epidemic is a problem in humans, but did you know that this insidious set of metabolic diseases is also a problem in the canine community? As in humans, diabetes mellitus is a result of a dog’s inadequate response to or total lack of the hormone called insulin. Other than that, though, it appears the diseases are slightly different in dogs than in humans.

Humans are susceptible to three different types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes, Type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes. In humans, Type 2 diabetes is the most prevalent form of the disease. In dogs, it is generally thought that Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes is the most common. This assumption is under scrutiny, however, because there are currently no globally accepted definitions of canine diabetes.

Many experts, including the United Kingdom’s Royal Veterinary College, have come to recognize only two kinds of dog diabetes. There is the canine insulin-resistant type (IRD) and the canine insulin-deficient type (IDD), and neither of these forms of diabetes matches human diabetes precisely.

Prevention

It’s impossible to prevent diabetes. One type, the kind that’s found in juvenile dogs, is inherited. But plenty of exercise and nutritious, wholesome dog food such as the CANIDAE Grain Free Pure formulas, can help prevent the onset of diabetes in adult dogs.

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