Category Archives: Laurie Darroch

How to Choose a Good Dog Shampoo

By Laurie Darroch

Dogs do need to be bathed on occasion, and you need to choose the right shampoo to get your canine friend clean. Their skin and fur attracts dirt, debris and pests which can cause health problems. A stinky dog can also smell up a house quickly, and get furniture and bedding filthy.

Don’t use products designed for humans for bathing your dog, no matter how much you like the smell of them. They’re not meant to be used on dogs. Don’t use dish detergent either, as it can be caustic and can burn their skin. The added chemicals and perfumes from these types of products may also cause allergic reactions or make your dog’s skin worse. The strong scents can be agitating to a dog’s super sensitive nose as well.

Look for a shampoo designed specifically for canine care with healthy ingredients such as aloe or oatmeal for moisturizing and cleaning. When buying dog shampoo, keep in mind that an adult dog may have different sensitivities and needs than a puppy does, so be sure to buy age appropriate products. Getting the right dog shampoo will help to keep his fur and skin healthy.

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Do Dogs Understand Spelling?

By Laurie Darroch

Although we often credit our dogs with capabilities far beyond their actual mental abilities, they do often seem as if they understand and respond to specific things we say. For example, when we spell words the same way we would in front of a small child in order to hide our meanings from them. Eventually a child grows old enough to understand what we are spelling, but a dog learns those words in very specific ways.

Dogs are not actually learning to spell the same way, even if it seems they suddenly understand and react to specific words spelled out in front of them. They make associations, and with constant repetition begin to associate certain words, sounds and letter sounds with any given situation such as a treat or other reward. They are clever animals and are aware of everything going on around them, but they process it differently than we do.

Take my dog Kira, for instance. One of her favorite games was chasing bubbles. If my daughter or I said the word “bubbles” Kira immediately went into an excited frenzy and raced to the door of the pantry where we stored our bottles of bubble liquid and the battery operated bubble blower that blew dozens of bubbles at a time for her to chase all over the yard until she was happily exhausted. Her tail would wag and all 100 pounds of her would bounce up and down impatiently waiting for us to get out the bubbles and go outside to play with her.

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Five Famous Dogs in Advertisements

By Laurie Darroch

Dogs have become famous symbols for many different brands. Some are so connected to the brand that their image instantly brings to mind the product or business it represents. With clever marketing and advertising, these dogs have made a huge impression on their viewing audiences, sometimes even taking on an almost cult-like following that shadows the original product they represent.

RCA Victor: Nipper

One of the classic icons of advertising, Nipper was shown sitting next to a large old-fashioned cylinder phonograph by Edison Bell. Nipper was first seen in a painting done by Francis James Barraud, the brother of Nipper’s original owner. Named for his habit of trying to nip visitors in the legs, the white Terrier with dark ears was born in 1894 and only lived for a year. His painting was done three years after his death.

Nipper became registered as the image of RCA for use in the United States in 1900. He represented RCA Victor Talking Machine Company, HMV, JVC, His Master’s Voice, and then RCA Victor. In later advertisements starting in 1991, a puppy companion named Chipper was added to some of the pictures.

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How to Help a Mother Dog Wean Her Puppies

By Laurie Darroch

When it’s time for a mother dog to wean her puppies, she knows what to do naturally. You can help the process along if you need to though. Generally, a mother dog begins to wean her puppies at about three or four weeks of age. Weaning usually ends at about eight weeks, but it is a gradual process over a period of weeks, not an instant removal of nursing.

During the nursing period, the puppies are beginning to learn proper behavior and socialization skills from their mother and through the interactions with their siblings. They also get nurturing and bonding during the nursing period, so they have a sense of belonging. Because a puppy’s vision is limited in the first couple weeks, they need to stay close to their mother. Nursing is not only food and nutrition; it provides a sense of security for the puppies.

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Tips for Treating Dry Itchy Skin in Dogs

By Laurie Darroch

If you notice your dog incessantly scratching various parts of his body with no signs of invasive skin parasites such as fleas, he may simply have dry or itchy skin that needs basic attention to help ward off the irritation. If you have ever experienced dry itchiness on your own skin, you know how annoying it can be. The constant rubbing and scratching can make a dog start to lose patches of hair or develop sores or open wounds.

Diet

Just like you, your dog can have food allergies. Not all dog food is the same. Cheap dog food might include products that keep the price low, but that keeps the quality low as well. Your dog may suffer from poor nutrition, or their system may not be tolerating all the added fillers used in cheap dog food. Buy a good quality, healthy dog food like CANIDAE to insure they are getting the nutrients they need to maintain optimum health on the inside, as well as the ingredients necessary for a healthy skin and coat. A consistent, healthy diet helps maintain healthy skin.

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Five Funny Things People Do with Their Dogs

fBy Laurie Darroch

A dog is not a human no matter how much we dog lovers try to give them human qualities or read human qualities into their interactions with us. People who love their dogs like family often do things that an outsider might find humorous or even downright silly. The fact is, we humans can be just as funny in our interactions with our dogs as they are with us.

Conversations

Our dogs are our companions. It is a normal thing to want to talk to them. Although dogs pick up on cues, voice inflection, and body language, and they do understand the association with particular words, they really do not have the language comprehension we give often them credit for.

I know I am often guilty of this odd behavior as I chatter on to my dog, Neela. When she sits in front of me with her head tilted as if she is trying her hardest to understand what I am saying to her, or she seems to be searching for a familiar word association that she can grasp, it is comical. The confused head tilt is very endearing to me.

I tell my dog about everything going on in my life. I also carry on deep one-sided discussions about life or daily events, and I even read my writing to her at times. She is probably thinking something like “Did she say the word treat in all that nonsensical chatter?” or “Are we going on a walk yet?”

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