Category Archives: Laurie Darroch

5 Reasons Playtime is Important for a Dog

playtime michaelBy Laurie Darroch

Playtime is an important part of caring for and loving your canine family member. Dogs are pack animals, and they enjoy time spent with us and other dogs. Playtime provides benefits for your dog’s physical and mental health as well. Here are 5 ways that playtime will enrich your dog’s life.

Bonding

One of the benefits of play is that it provides individualized bonding time with your dog. Some dogs enjoy playtime so much that they will bring a favorite toy to their human companion when they want to play, or stand by the place where you store their favorite toys to drop a not-so-subtle hint that they want to play. It is their way of communicating and saying, “Please come play with me now!” Playtime can become a favorite part of a dog’s day. If you have more than one dog in your home, playtime is a good way for them to bond with each other as well.

Exercise

Every dog needs exercise, whether it is walking, running, or even specific types of playtime activities such as chasing balls or bubbles, playing tug of war, digging for hidden toys or enjoying a rousing game of hide and seek. Exercise is good for physical well-being and maintaining musculature and healthy joints. Your dog burns off calories as well with all the physical activity. Good playtime gives them a healthy appetite for their favorite CANIDAE  grain free PURE dog food when meal time arrives.

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10 Dog Related Terms Used in Conversation

By Laurie Darroch

Dogs have become so much a part of our world that terms related to their behavior and interactions are interwoven into our conversations. Although there are many dog-related expressions, this sampling of just ten will show you how much our canine friends have influenced us.

Dog Tired

If you’ve ever watched your dog run and play with extreme high energy until they fall asleep and barely move a muscle from sheer exhaustion, you have an idea of the origins of the term dog tired. A dog who is that tired may be difficult to rouse from sleep. When you are dog tired, you have reached the end of your rope and need rest to rev up for the next activity or day.

Dog-Eared

This term has different meanings depending on its usage. A dog-eared book has the corners of pages turned down as bookmarks, or to mark pages with pertinent information. Sometimes it is the sign of a very loved and well-read book. Any item which is worn out or shabby may also be referred to as dog-eared (old clothing, photographs or houses, for example). Basically, the item has seen better days.

In a Dog’s Age

You may not have seen an old friend in a dog’s age, or you may not have been to an old hangout or eaten a favorite food in a dog’s age. It simply means it has been a very long time since you’ve had that experience. The typical life span of dogs is about 10 to 15 years. That is a long time not to have done something you used to do!

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The All Dog Radio Website: Online Fun for Dog Lovers

By Laurie Darroch

While doing some of my endless researching and web searches, I happened across an internet website that is totally dedicated to all things dog. Intrigued, and obviously being a longtime dog lover, I wanted to see what the All Dog Radio site had to offer. I discovered that it’s full of trivia, music and other dog-related content, and some of it was quite surprising, fun and informative.

The site has a large collection of varied musical recordings that are described as “The WooFTunes Music Library! Probably the largest collection of Dog Music & Dog Songs anywhere!”. The musical choices range from rap to a page called “WoofHouse” which is a concert series of unplugged non-amplified and acoustic musicians.  The WoofHouse musicians travel by dog cart and perform around parts of Maryland and Pennsylvania on their little red cart.

All Dog Radio offers pages of jokes, poetry, song and rap lyrics, (available in recorded format to listen to or in print to read if you prefer it that way), and dog stories, including three ongoing fictional stories. If you want to send in your own stories, the site encourages submissions of your own real life doggy tales. For those into political related trivia, the First Dogs make an appearance on the website as well.

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How to Know if Your Dog Has Allergies

By Laurie Darroch

Dogs can have an allergic reaction or ongoing allergies caused by a variety of things including food, fabrics, cleansers, shampoos and detergents, and bites from fleas. The symptoms of dog allergies can vary depending on the cause. It can take some detective work to ferret out the offender that causes the allergic reaction. Sometimes the cause is obvious and other times you may have to use the process of elimination or get the advice of your vet who can help to treat the allergies and their symptoms when they are severe or do not go away.

Allergies can make your dog very uncomfortable and cause a great deal of distress. If you were having difficulty breathing, or itching and scratching all the time, you would react the same way. Your dog can’t tell you what the problem is, so that is when you as their companion have to discover and solve their allergy issues.

An allergic reaction is the body telling itself that something dangerous is present and trying to ward off that offender. Some dogs will have no reaction whatsoever to something that may give another dog a severe reaction. Like us, dogs are individuals and their bodies handle things differently.

Airborne

Some of the same allergens that affect humans can bother your dog as well. If you notice your dog sneezing or they have developed a chronic cough, it’s a good idea to pay attention to what is around them when they are having the worst reactions. It may be ongoing or may be acute and only occur when they are exposed to a specific allergen.  For instance, dogs can be allergic to cigarette smoke the same way humans can. Scents can also set off an allergic reaction. Chemicals we use for cleaning or even perfumes can irritate your dog and make them sneeze or cough.

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The Benefits of Booties for Dogs

By Laurie Darroch

Although dogs have thick pads on their feet and they are built to weather all kinds of climates and terrain, there are situations where booties can add protection for their feet. When their own natural protection is not enough, booties will help to keep their feet free of injury.

Dog booties come in many different styles and materials designed for specific uses, ranging from weather extremes and injury protection to fun and everything in between.

Seasonal Booties

The extremes of weather can wreak havoc on your dog’s feet. Ice and snow can hurt feet that are not used to walking in the cold, and the sharp ice can cut through the pads of their feet. If you take your dog out to play in the snow, the addition of booties will protect their feet and provide additional insulation.

Dogs can benefit from wearing protective booties in the summer as well, particularly on scorcher days when the pavement or sand is extremely hot. Think about it; if the pavement or sand is too hot for you to walk on with bare feet, it’s probably uncomfortable for your canine friend as well. Dogs can get burned or frozen feet the same way you can.

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Should I Shave My Dog’s Fur in Hot Weather?

By Laurie Darroch

As the weather changes from cold to hot, you may feel that your dog would stay cooler if you cut his fur. However, before you do that, you need to think about what type of dog you have and what the layers of fur actually do for a dog, particularly if they are a double coated breed.

Look into the type of coat your particular dog has. Not all coats are the same, and what may seem cooler to you may not actually be helping your dog. In many cases, it’s better to opt for daily grooming and maintenance instead of shaving off your dog’s protective fur. You may be doing more damage than good by removing natural covering.

Types of Dog Hair

Some dogs have what is called a double coat. It is actually two layers of hair that are meant to protect the dog from the elements, including heat. The undercoat is thicker and softer than the overcoat. The double layers actually trap cooler air in against the dog’s body. It is built-in insulation. Huskies and German Shepherds are two types of dogs with double coats. It may look hot to you and be work to take care of their coat, but you may be doing them a disservice by shaving them if it is not absolutely necessary because of extreme coat damage.

Other dog breeds have single coats, such as the Doberman Pinscher or the French Bulldog. Some dogs are non-shedders or low shedders, such as the Poodle, Kerry Blue Terrier or Lakeland Terrier, but some non-shedders or low shedders can be double coated as well. The point is to know and understand your particular dog’s breed and coat type before you make any decisions regarding shaving or clipping for hot weather.

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