Category Archives: Linda Cole

CANIDAE’s New PURE Dog Treats are Chewy and Grain Free!

Keikei treats 1By Keikei Cole, canine guest blogger

It’s amazing how long it can take to train a human. They can be bossy, stubborn and not always good about sharing. My doggy friends know what I’m talking about; hint: you planning to share that sandwich? Just yesterday, my human (“the boss”) was eating something that smelled really good and I sat, laid down, asked politely and drooled on her leg (that was an accident) and all I got was one measly bite. OK, she did give some of those tiny meals I love – a.k.a. CANIDAE dog treats – after she was finished, but I had to run through all of the stuff I know first. I didn’t mind. That’s what human training is all about. What surprised me was an interesting scent which turned out to be a new “motivator” and it was chewy and quite tasty. Woof! I was as happy as a rabbit running around in a carrot patch.

I soon discovered there were actually six new “tiny meals” in the CANIDAE dog treat lineup. I was really psyched and ready to learn how to do a triple back flip if the boss was up to showing me how it was done. She wasn’t, but we did run through what I already know so I was able to taste all of the new PURE Chewy soft-baked treats. However, I still had to share them with my siblings. The boss has this dumb rule. If I get one, so does everyone else.

Read More »

EmailGoogle GmailBlogger PostTwitterFacebookGoogle+PinterestShare

How to Teach Your Dog Not to Rush Out the Door

By Linda Cole

For some dogs, an opened door is an invitation to rush through before it closes. But for us, it’s frightening to watch our beloved pet bolt across the yard and disappear out of sight, or head towards a road with a car bearing down on them. Cheyenne, my Siberian Husky, looked for any chance to escape through the front door, and I developed a technique to use when someone rang the doorbell. Cracking the door open so I could block it with my body, I stood on one leg and used the other one to keep her away. She just wanted to go for a run, but there are other reasons why dogs fly out an opened door. Fortunately, I found a better technique than the one-legged dance to teach my dog not to rush through the door.

Why dogs try to escape out the front door

Dogs are individuals, and some are more adventurous and independent than others. Working breeds, terriers, scenthounds and sighthounds were bred to do their jobs away from their human, and are likely to bolt out a door to run down an interesting scent or chase an animal they see. Some dogs may be focused on finding a mate. If that’s the case, spaying or neutering your pet may help reduce a desire to wander. A fearful dog may see an opened door as a way to escape what he fears. Homes with multiple dogs might charge the open door as a competition to see who can get outside first, and some dogs enjoy the “game” of their owner frantically chasing them down the street.

Read More »

Do Dogs and Cats Have Taste Buds?

taste micoloBy Linda Cole

When considering what a dog is willing to woof down, you can’t help but wonder if they actually taste what they eat. It doesn’t seem to matter to a dog whether it’s their favorite CANIDAE meal, a bug or an ice cube. My dogs will eat everything with gusto as if it had been prepared by a top chef. My cats hunt flies, spiders and other small creatures, and occasionally an overlooked dust bunny. The senses of dogs and cats are far superior to ours, but do they have taste buds, and can they really taste what they eat?

Taste buds play an ingenious role in human and animal survival and are designed to help keep us alive. Without the ability to distinguish between certain tastes it would be difficult to know which foods are safe to eat and which ones to avoid. Something that tastes bad usually means it could be harmful to swallow, and a good taste would be an indication it is safe to consume. All vertebrates have taste buds on their tongues, but how many a species has depends on which tastes they need to be able to detect to stay safe. Humans have about 10,000 taste buds, whereas dogs only have around 1,700 and cats have approximately 470. Because herbivores, like cows for example, dine on a large variety of plants, more taste buds are needed to help them tell if a plant is toxic or beneficial for them to eat.

Read More »

5 Dog-Friendly National Parks

national parks fpat murrayBy Linda Cole

There are 58 national parks in the United States, and each one has its own awe-inspiring beauty and wildlife to enjoy. Last year, almost 70 million people visited a national park. If you are planning a trip that includes your dog and would like to take in the views of our national parks, some do allow limited access for canines, and five are considered to be “dog friendly.”

Pet access varies from park to park. Park superintendents have the authority to adjust pet policies at their specific park to ensure that the land, wildlife and the pets are protected. It’s important to plan ahead before heading out to a national park, historic site or seashore, and do research to make sure pets are welcome. Many national parks only allow dogs in designated areas like roads and developed areas. Most trails or wilderness areas are off limits to canines. Finding lodging for you and your pet can also be a challenge, but some parks do have kennels for pets. The only exception are service dogs who are allowed to go everywhere with their owner.

You can find current information about pet policies, entry fees, park hours and scheduled events at national parks on the National Park Service website. For pet policies, go to the search bar in the upper right hand corner where it says “find a park.” Click on a state and scroll down to find the national park you’re interested in. On the left side, click on plan your visit, click basic information, scroll down and click pets. You will also notice a red box for park alerts such as weather updates and construction projects.

Read More »

Home Remodeling Hazards for Pets

remodel jenniferBy Linda Cole

Many homeowners like to spruce up their house with fresh paint, needed repairs or a complete makeover for an outdated room. However, homes with pets need to be especially vigilant when the power tools and paint brushes come out. Regardless of whether you do it yourself or hire someone, there are home remodeling hazards for pets that you need to be aware of.

Lead Paint

It’s common to find lead paint in homes built before 1978, and many homeowners aren’t aware of it. Lead can be found in linoleum, old putty around windows, or old paint covered over with non-leaded paint, wallpaper or paneling. When lead paint is scraped off or sanded, it turns into dust and contaminates the air. This dust can put pets at risk of lead poisoning when they ingest the dust while grooming. Pets can be exposed to lead by chewing on woodwork or ingesting flakes or chips of paint that have fallen off.

If you aren’t sure whether the existing paint is lead based, testing kits can be found at many home repair stores; it’s recommended to test before beginning any scraping or sanding. If you find lead paint in your home, it’s best to talk to a professional who is knowledgeable about lead-based paints before continuing.

Paints, Stains and Varnishes

Most products for inside use are water based and not as toxic to pets, but they can cause diarrhea and vomiting. If your dog or cat gets a water based product on them, it can be washed off with warm water and dish soap. If you’re dealing with an oil-based product, keep your pet from licking it off and wait for it to dry. When it’s dry, use scissors or clippers to cut it from their coat. Paint thinner, turpentine or mineral spirits should never be used to remove paint, stains or varnishes from your pet’s coat, because they can cause painful chemical burns. Keep pets away from opened cans of these products.

Read More »

Seven Inventions Inspired by Cats and Dogs

inventions cat eyeBy Linda Cole

It takes a creative mind to find solutions that can make daily life easier or better. When there’s a need, someone can usually find a solution – often times in unlikely ways. Sometimes a creative invention is inspired by dogs and cats.

“Cat Eye” Road Reflectors

On a foggy night in 1933, Percy Shaw was driving home along a dangerous stretch of road with a perilous, sheer drop off on one side. Drivers knew where the edge of the road was when their headlights reflected off of tram tracks, but the tracks had been removed for repairs. As Shaw strained to see through the blackness, his headlights caught the eyes of a cat sitting on a fence. As he pondered the possibility of replicating how a cat’s eyes reflect light, an idea took shape to make dark and dangerous roads safer for drivers. Shaw began manufacturing reflective road markers in 1935. Today reflective “cat eye” road studs are incorporated in roads worldwide.

Safety Thumbtack

Biomimicry is science that studies nature to find solutions to problems. The thumbtack was invented in 1903 by Mick Clay, an English inventor. Looking to nature to find a better way to construct the tack, New York design engineer Toshi Fukaya wanted to improve the thumbtack to avoid pricked fingers when pulling one out of the box. His inspiration – the sheath of a cat’s claw. The new innovation in thumbtacks has a hollow silicone sheath that holds the pin inside until it’s pressed into a board, wall or other hard surface. When the tack is removed, the pin withdraws back into the silicone sheath.

Read More »