Category Archives: Linda Cole

How Much Exercise Do Dogs Need Each Day?

By Linda Cole

We know it’s important to make sure our dogs get proper exercise to help maintain their weight and overall health, and provide mental stimulation. Every dog, regardless of size, needs a chance to stretch their legs every day, but how much exercise is enough? Breed does make a difference in the amount of exercise needed, and a dog that isn’t given a chance to get rid of pent up energy can develop bad behaviors.

Before beginning any strenuous activities, you should have your vet give your dog a checkup to make sure he’s up to a more physical workout. Each dog is an individual and it’s important to create an exercise routine that takes into account breed, age and physical condition. Old or current injuries, weather conditions and the amount of exercise needed should also be considered when it comes to daily exercise.

You can encourage your dog to play with other dogs at the dog park, or learn how to do agility or other dog sports, but you should never force him to do something he isn’t interested in doing. The amount of daily exercise should be based on what a dog was bred to do. That’s one reason why it’s helpful having a general idea of which breeds make up your mixed breed dog.

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Recognizing Stress in Dogs and Cats

By Linda Cole

A few summers ago, a young raccoon in the neighborhood apparently decided my dogs were interesting to watch. I don’t know if he was lonely or thought the dogs were funny looking, but he’d show up almost every day when they were outside in their pen. He’d climb one of the trees overlooking the pen to sit and watch them. The dogs knew he was in the tree, and it frustrated them to no end. The raccoon forced us to change our nighttime routine to keep the dogs from waking up the neighborhood with their excited barking. He eventually moved on, but his presence definitely stressed out the dogs. We don’t always stop to consider how anxiety in a dog or cat’s life affects them, or what even causes it, but too much stress can lead to health issues and behavior problems.

What Causes Stress for Pets?

Shelter animals deal with stress on a daily basis. They live in a noisy environment with no way to escape or hide. Sensitive pets have a hard time dealing with shelter life. Stray and lost pets have to contend with a host of issues that can put their health at risk. Stress in dogs and cats is caused by environmental, emotional or physical issues.

Environmental stress is caused by moving to a new home, a change in routine, holidays, loss of a family member (human or animal), other pets, trips to the vet and other issues dealing with their environment.

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Does the Way You Greet Your Dog Affect Their Wellbeing?

By Linda Cole

Two of my dogs, Keikei and Dozer, love to wrestle with each other outside. Both of them enjoy the back and forth, and trying to get them back inside after their morning duty run was frustrating, to say the least. One day I decided to try a new tactic, and when Keikei was at the foot of the stairs, I called her to come, showed her a CANIDAE Pure Heaven treat, and waited for her to bounce up the steps. When she got to the top, I gave her the treat, along with some praise and a mini massage. Treats will definitely get a dog’s attention, but according to a new study, how you greet your dog matters.

The bond we have with other people or our pet doesn’t happen overnight. It’s a process of earning and building on a trust that grows over time. Our human tendency is to gravitate towards people with a positive attitude who are quick to give us a warm smile. It’s nonthreatening, comforting and indicates friendliness. A simple greeting makes you feel good. When touch is added, the emotional response has a lasting effect. Touch is an important aspect of the bonding process with dogs too. A casual touch from someone who cares is a positive sign of an emotional bond. Like us, dogs are social creatures and how we greet them plays a role in their emotional outlook. Dogs need to feel our touch as much as we need contact from people we care about.

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Why Do Guardian Dogs Excel at Schutzhund?

By Linda Cole

Schutzhund is a competitive dog sport that started in Germany at the turn of the 20th century. It was designed to evaluate a dog’s mental stability, courage and protective instinct as well as the ability to scent, willingness to do his job, and the ability to be trained.

The events in Schutzhund (tracking, protection and obedience) were developed by Max von Stephanitz, the German breeder responsible for creating the German Shepherd Dog. By the time the GSD had been developed, the job the breed was originally bred to do – herding – was on the decline in Germany. The German Shepherd has always been a versatile dog capable of doing far more than just herding, and von Stephanitz developed Schutzhund as a sport to maintain the working ability of the breed.

The German Shepherd Dog Club refined the sport in the 1920s to continue the quality of the breed. Other guardian breeds also excel in this intense competition, although most can’t meet the intense training and challenges of Schutzhund.

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Why Don’t Dogs Like Us Messing with Their Feet?

By Linda Cole

All dogs need to have their nails trimmed from time to time, even if they don’t like it. Some breeds also need to have the hair between their toes and paw pads trimmed to give them traction and prevent slipping. My dogs love to shake hands and are used to me handling their feet. Yet the minute nail clippers or scissors appear, it’s obvious this isn’t an activity they agree with. Although, a couple CANIDAE Pure Heaven treats can make the process a bit more acceptable. So why will a dog bug you to shake hands, but then pull his paw away when you hold on to it so you can cut nails or trim hair?

Consider the importance we place on our feet and hands. Feet give us mobility when we want to move around or need to flee from danger. Hands are communication tools – how many of you can talk without using your hands? It’s much easier to take care of ourselves, stay clean, eat, protect ourselves and perform other tasks that would be difficult to do without hands.

To dogs, their feet are every bit as important to their survival. Feet are used to chase down prey, run away from danger, protect themselves, dig holes to flush out prey, find cooler soil in the summer or stay warmer in the winter, bury food to prevent other animals from stealing it and investigate things. Dogs also use their feet to communicate.

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10 Tricks Your Dog Can Learn Quickly

By Linda Cole

Teaching your dog basic commands helps to keep them safe and gives you better control of your pet. Sometimes, however, training can become boring for you and your dog. Most canines enjoy learning new things, and teaching him tricks he can learn quickly is a great way to mix things up. It also helps to reinforce commands he already knows and makes training more fun for both of you.

Keep training sessions short – 10 minutes max – and reward each success with treats and praise. Encouragement is key in helping your pet learn, and even good attempts to try to do what you ask should be rewarded with honest praise.

Spin Around – Hold a CANIDAE treat in front of your face to get your dog’s attention. Stand still and say “spin.” Move your hand with the treat slowly around so your dog can follow it. When he makes a complete circle, reward immediately with treat and praise. You can also teach him to stand on his back legs and spin around. Hold the treat above his head until he’s standing on his back legs, say “spin,” and move the treat for him to follow.

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