Category Archives: Linda Cole

Why Do Cats Like to Steal Shiny Objects?

By Linda Cole

Cat vision isn’t as clear as ours. Because they are true predators, their vision is designed to pick up quick movements of prey, especially in dim light. Cats and dogs have more rod cells that can quickly refresh to pick up the slightest movement of prey walking  through the grass at dusk. They have fewer cones which are responsible for our detailed and sharp color vision.

Feline vision is blurry, but their peripheral vision is much better and has more range than ours, enabling them to see a mouse out of the corner of their eye. The smallest movements capture a cat’s attention, and if it shines that’s a reason to investigate.

Cats focus on shiny objects for the same reason we do – curiosity. If you spot something shiny on the ground, your impulse is to investigate. It gets your attention because it might be something special, like a lost ring or coin. Perhaps it’s nothing more than a piece of glass or tin reflecting sunlight. It doesn’t matter what it is, we check it out because it’s shiny. Curiosity may grab a cat’s attention too, but the main reason they steal our shiny things is for attention and wanting to play.
Read More »

EmailGoogle GmailBlogger PostTwitterFacebookGoogle+PinterestShare

Zinc Poisoning in Dogs and Cats

By Linda Cole

Zinc is an essential trace element that humans, dogs, cats and other animals need for good health, but only in small amounts. It’s common to find zinc around the house in different products we use, in pet carriers, coins and a host of other sources. Zinc poisoning can occur when we ingest too much of this element, and it can cause serious health issues. The severity depends on how much was consumed, what form the zinc is in, and the size of the person or pet.

Zinc occurs naturally in the environment in soil, rocks, water air, and in the food we eat. It’s the second most common trace metal found naturally in our bodies (iron is the most common). In humans and animals, zinc helps boost the immune system, regulate appetite and heal wounds, and is essential for proper growth and development. It is possible for humans, pets, and other animals to have a zinc deficiency, but before reaching for supplements talk to your doctor or vet first. Most pets who eat a balanced diet don’t need additional zinc, which is why feeding them a quality food like CANIDAE is important.

In the home, zinc can be found in common things like the nuts and bolts in pet carriers, batteries, paint, nails, screws, tacks, staples, automotive parts, board game pieces, some toys, fertilizers, zippers, jewelry, creams or lotions that contain zinc oxide, some prescription medications, herbal supplements, multivitamins, deodorants, fungicides, shampoos, calamine lotion, suppositories, antiseptics, cold lozenges, U.S .pennies minted after 1982 (97.5% zinc) and Canadian pennies minted between 1997 and 2001 (96% zinc).

Read More »

Easy-to-Make Warm Winter Coat for Your Dog

By Linda Cole

Not all dogs need a winter coat. Their natural one does a fine job, as long as it’s clean and free of mats and tangles. However, some canines don’t have an adequate coat that will keep them warm, and they may need a winter coat. If you notice your dog shivering during the winter months, it’s a sign he is cold and could use a coat. You can find a large selection of dog coats at pet stores, but it’s easy to make your own.

You will need:

● Quilted material (100% cotton face and back and polyester fill) for outer shell, and fleece material for inner shell. It’s recommended to wash the quilted material before using because it will shrink a little. Bast around the edges before washing, to keep it from unraveling. You could also cut the quilted material about an inch wider than the fleece to adjust for any shrinkage and not prewash the material.

Quilted material will cost around $12.50 per yard depending on pattern, and fleece will run from $3.00-$12.00 per yard depending on where you buy your material. For small dogs like Yorkshire Terriers and toy breeds, half a yard of each material is all you need. For most sizes of dogs, one yard of each material should be more than enough, unless your pet is really big. You need enough material to make the body of the coat, a collar, and a belly strap.
Read More »

Is Your Dog an Optimist or a Pessimist?

By Linda Cole

Anyone who has spent quality time with a dog understands how complicated canines can be. Like us, dogs view the world from their own individual perspective. An interesting new study has found that dogs see things in an optimistic or pessimistic way, and how your dog behaves could be because he sees his dish of CANIDAE as “half full” or “half empty.”

How we interpret events in our lives is based on our world view. We are idealists, realists, optimists or pessimists, and how we react to different situations depends on our mental attitude. An optimistic person sees the glass as half full and has faith that any given situation will have the best possible outcome. A pessimist sees the glass as half empty and doesn’t have confidence that a positive outcome will occur.

Read More »

Pet-Safe Ways to Rid Your Home of Rodents

By Linda Cole

Mice are experts at finding ways into our homes. Cracks, holes and crevices in foundations provide easy access, and if you see one mouse there’s likely more lurking about in the walls, duct work, attics and basements. Some people use rodent poison to get rid of mice and rats, but it poses a grave danger to cats and dogs and shouldn’t be used in a home with pets. There are ways to rid your home of rodents that are safer for your pets and more humane for the mice.

Even though I have cats and dogs, I still get mice inside my house when the weather turns colder. They are usually caught by one of my pets, which is a natural way of controlling vermin. However, I’m a true blue animal lover, which includes mice. So my challenge is finding ways to deal with the mice that won’t harm them.

Live Mouse Traps can be very effective, as long as you check them several times a day to remove caught rodents, freshen the bait (peanut butter on crackers or dry cat food works well), and make sure you purchase a quality trap. You can find traps to catch multiple mice at a time or smaller ones that hold just one or two. The air supply in some traps is limited and if you don’t remove a mouse soon after it’s caught, it can die from asphyxiation. Trapped mice can then be released outside. Mice can find their way back home, so you’ll need to release it at least ½ mile or so away. The best place is in a wooded or bushy area where they can find shelter and isn’t near other homes.

Read More »

Do Pet Owners Form Closer Bonds with Other People?

By Linda Cole

Bonding is something most humans do without thinking about it. As individuals, we each have our own personality, strengths, flaws and preferences. We tend to gravitate towards other people who share our interests, and as the relationship develops, so does bonding. Most pet owners think of their dog or cat as a member of their family and the connection we share with our pets is unique. But does our special bond with a pet help us form closer relationships with other people? According to science, it does.

Beginning some 10,000 years ago, humans and canines formed a unique pact that benefited both species. We know our early ancestors placed great value in their pets because dogs and cats have been found in burial sites with humans, indicating people felt it was important to give their pet a proper burial. Throughout the many decades of animal domestication, the bonds between humans and our furry friends have made us healthier and happier, and helped us cope with life’s surprises. Pets also help us connect with other people because caring for animals gives us a sense of empathy.

Natural disasters and house fires occur every year. We watched with sadness as the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina unfolded. Researchers conducted studies to find out why many New Orleans residents refused to evacuate to safe shelters, and discovered it was because people didn’t want to leave their pets behind. I didn’t know any of these pet owners, but could relate with the decision they had made. Most pet owners are willing to risk their life to save a pet, according to a 2013 Vanity Fair poll that found 81% of dog owners and 71% of cat owners would go back inside their burning home to save their pet.

Read More »