Category Archives: noise pollution

How Sensory Overload Stresses Out Pets

By Linda Cole

Let’s face it. Today’s world is a noisy place for us and our pets. Unfortunately, the sensory input our pets experience on a day-to-day basis can be causing them stress. All of the noises, smells and sights we encounter are usually taken in stride by us, but can be a bit much for our furry friends.

A cat’s sense of smell is fourteen times stronger than ours, and a dog surpasses our sense of smell by 1,000 to 10,000 times, depending on the dog’s breed. When it comes to hearing, dogs can hear sounds at around 80 feet while our ears only hear effectively at 20 feet. Dogs can pinpoint direction in just six-hundredths of a second and calculate the distance of sounds much better than we can.

Dogs and cats hear more frequencies, with cats capable of hearing high frequency sounds dogs can’t hear. A cat’s hearing is so precise they can hear a mouse three feet away and knows where it’s at just by sound. Felines hear sounds about five times farther away than we can. In short, pets are more aware of all of the sounds around them and their nose also keeps them well informed. It’s no wonder they can hear you opening that bag of CANIDAE treats!

Too Much Noise

We don’t think about the everyday sounds we encounter. We’re so used to hearing them that we don’t notice how noisy the world is until we shut everything down for the night. If our pets had their way, they would ask us to tone it down a couple of notches. We tune out a lot of noise, but pets can’t do that.

Most homes have at least one TV on when someone is home. Radios, stereos, videos on the computer, video games and cellphone ringtones all produce noise pollution inside the home. The dishwasher, washing machine, dryer and microwave seem innocent enough to us, but it’s what we can’t hear that can be annoying to pets. To them, the lower the volume, the easier it is on their sensitive ears. Pets are listening to outside sounds as well. That’s a lot of noise for them to contend with. If your pet gets up and leaves the room, it could be because they need to find a quiet place where they can relax and unwind.

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