Category Archives: pet safety tips

Tips to Keep Your Dog Safe on Halloween

halloween safety donelleBy Laurie Darroch

Although Halloween festivities are fun for people of all ages, they are sometimes stressful and dangerous for a dog. Taking some precautions will help keep your dog safe during trick or treating and Halloween gatherings.

Candy and Goodies

No matter how well trained or well behaved your dog is, sometimes temptation can be overpowering for a dog. Given the opportunity, they might give in to the siren call of delicious smelling goodies sitting in easy reach. Eating items like chocolate or wrappings can be particularly dangerous for a dog. They won’t stop at one piece of candy either, if they get into an easily accessible bowl of sweets. A dog may try to eat as much as they can get away with before they get caught.

Keep the treats out of your dog’s reach, and don’t give them little bites of even the harmless treats. That is an open invitation for them to try and get more. Instead, make sure they’ve had a full meal of their own healthy CANIDAE dog food before the festivities begin. Your dog will be less likely to be tempted if their hunger is already sated. Keep a bag of CANIDAE dog treats handy as well, so if they are tempted by the sweets you can substitute something more appropriate for them.
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Actions That Could Save Your Pet in a House Fire

house-fire-Angela-Antunes-1By Langley Cornwell

A fire breaks out in your kitchen and quickly becomes larger than your fire extinguisher can handle. Or maybe you wake up in the middle of the night to the smell of smoke and the blare of smoke detectors. You need to get your family out fast – including your pets.

No one is ever fully prepared for the reality of a house fire, but those who are best prepared have an evacuation plan, a go-bag with important documents, and a meeting place for everyone in the house, including  pets. These suggestions could help save your pet in case of a house fire.

Proper Pet Identification

Make sure all of your pets are wearing collars and/or have microchips. The sound of a fire alarm is scary and may send a skittish pet into hiding, as will the smell of smoke. Your pet may accidentally end up outside the house, or may bolt out of your grasp in the chaos. Identification will make it easier for him to be returned home if he’s found.

Having a pet identification sticker on your front window is important because it will alert the fire department that there are pets inside the house, if they don’t come out of the house with you. Write the number and type of pet (dogs, cats, etc.) on the sticker.

Leashes and Carriers

Have your leashes and carriers in easy-to-find locations. For most dogs, the leashes should be kept in common areas or near doors so you can quickly attach them before you leave the house.

house-fire-robin-zebrowskiYour cat carrier should be kept in a safe place, but preferably one that gives the cat constant access rather than anxiety. Many cats fear their carriers and will panic, bolt and become defensive when it comes into sight. Cats that have access to their carriers all the time are less likely to panic when you try to put them inside. If your cat is the anxious type, you may want to leave some heavy gloves near your carrier to protect you from the bites and scratches of a panicked pet.

The Family Plan: Identifying Hiding Spots

What type of plan do you have for the members of your household? It’s a good idea to have someone designated to grab the go-bag, someone responsible for making sure the kids are out of bed, and someone designated to locate the pets and usher them to safety. If there is chaos, will that person know where to look?

Pay attention to the places your pets hide when they’re scared – especially during storms. Many animals have a place where they feel safe. Your dogs and cats are likely to go to those same places, many of which – especially in the case of cats – are small and confined.

With dogs, you may try to train them for emergencies. The Emma Zen Foundation, for example, offers dog safety games you can use to teach your dog how to react in an emergency. You can train him to respond to specific commands or even a smoke detector. Training your dog to go to a specific spot will give you a great starting point when it comes to locating him in a true emergency.

If you for some reason can’t locate your pet, leave a door open when you exit the house. Your pet may run outside by himself.

house-fire-joel-kramerHave an Emergency Kit on Hand

You should have an emergency kit for both your family and for your pets. In the pet emergency kit, include a few days’ worth of premium quality CANIDAE pet food, bottled water, copies of vaccination records, a first aid kit, an extra leash, and photographs of your pets. Some experts recommend having pictures of your pets alone in case you need to make “missing” flyers later, but also pictures of your pets with your family in case collars and tags are lost and you need a way of proving ownership.

Where Will You Go?

Finally, where will you go once you are out of the house? There will be quite a bit of chaos outside, especially after the police and fire department arrive on the scene. Do you have a pet-friendly neighbor or nearby family member who can take your pets, preferably indoors? Your pets will need a safe, quiet place where they can be kept calm throughout the ordeal.

Over 500,000 pet deaths occur each year during house fires.  Taking a few precautionary measures and having a plan in place will help prevent your pet from adding to that number.

If you want to know more about the dog that inspired the Emma Zen Foundation, check out our RPO article:  Meet Emma Zen, Fundraising Canine for Pet Oxygen Masks.

Top photo by Angela Antunes/Flickr
Middle photo by Robin Zebrowski/Flickr 
Bottom photo by Joel Kramer/Flickr 

Read more articles by Langley Cornwell

Can You Leave Your Cat Home Alone for the Weekend?

cat home alone KymberlyBy Linda Cole

Every summer, I “cat sit” for a friend who enjoys dashing off for weekend getaways. Each time she asks me to watch her kitties, she ends by saying, “I know they would be alright, but I feel better knowing someone is checking in on them.” Cats may be solitary creatures, but that doesn’t mean they don’t miss you when you’re gone. Having someone watch your cats when you go away can give you peace of mind – in more ways than one.

As a lifelong cat owner, I’ve learned to never assume a cat can’t find a way to get herself into a situation she sometimes can’t get out of on her own. I had a cat pull the hose off my dryer, climb through it to the vent on the side of the house, and get stuck. I found her hanging upside down when I got home from work. She was fine, but it scared the daylights out of me.

One of my neutered male cats backed up to an electrical socket and sprayed into it which gave him a shock and produced a steady plume of smoke from the socket. I was assured by the firemen who inspected the socket that everything was alright. However, I was right in calling them because my cat could have started a fire. We can’t control or foresee issues that might arise, and leaving your cat home alone for more than a day could turn out to be a bad decision.

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Safety Tips for Hiking or Camping with Your Dog

camping fab4chikyBy Linda Cole

When heading out for an afternoon of hiking or a camping trip that includes your dog, some planning is needed to make sure the outing is safe and fun for everyone. Being prepared for the unexpected by packing important items, and remembering some simple safety tips can help create a worry-free adventure for you and your dog.

Fleas, ticks and mosquitoes are sure to be lurking in the grass or around water. Make sure your dog has been treated with flea, tick and heartworm protection, and that his vaccinations are current. Ticks climb to the top of tall grass and weeds to wait for a warm body passing by so they can attach themselves to it. When hiking or camping in areas where ticks are common, bring a tick removing gadget so you can safely remove them if you find them on you or your dog.

On camping trips, it’s a good idea to add a temporary ID tag to your dog’s normal tags on his collar. On the tag, write the name of the park you’re visiting as well as the number of your assigned campsite. If you aren’t camping in a park or there are no assigned campsites, write the phone number of the nearest ranger station. If there isn’t a ranger station nearby, write the phone number of a family member or friend who knows how to contact you. You should also have a standard ID tag on your dog’s collar that includes the dog’s name, your name and phone number. Even if your pet has a microchip, an ID tag can be read without a scanner.

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How to Stop Your Pet from Chewing on Power Cords

chew power cordBy Langley Cornwell

Lately, my social media feed has been dotted with people complaining about their pets chewing on power cords. I didn’t pay much attention at first because this, fortunately, isn’t a problem in my household. But the more I saw mention of it, the more concerned I became.

One of our dogs was a terrible chewer at first. If we left anything on the ground or at eye level, no matter what it was, she would tear it up if we weren’t careful. I can’t bear to think of all the mauled shoes, books, eyeglasses and baseball caps we threw away. But somehow, through it all, she never turned her attention to the tangle of electrical cords in my office.

Any type of inappropriate chewing is a problem, but when your pet latches onto a power cord, things get serious. Sure, fixing a damaged electrical cord is an expensive proposition; of course you don’t want to have to rewire that lamp or purchase a new power cord for your computer. But more importantly, you don’t want to have to take your dog to the veterinarian, or worse. Chewing on a power cord could cause your pet serious injury or even electrocution.

Taking it back to the source, I asked for firsthand advice from my animal-loving online friends. Their tips for stopping a pet from chewing on power cords fell into several general categories.
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Should You Put Your Dog’s Name on Their Collar Tags?

By Laurie Darroch

The safety and security of a beloved dog is a priority for any responsible loving dog owner. Dogs are not just pets; they are family members. They have tags for three purposes. Tags are used to identify the dog and locate the owners of a dog in case they get hurt or lost, to show verification of shots and licensing, and simply as an adornment to proudly show their name. The choice of dog tag styles is varied, but should your dog’s name be included on their tags or not?

Some dog tags simply have the animal’s first name. The tag should include some form of contact with the human guardian. If you are hesitant to put your address on the tag for anyone to see, use a phone number and possibly an email address for contact purposes, but do have a tag of some kind. It is security for them and peace of mind for you. Losing an adventurous, curious or naughty dog can be heartbreaking and frightening. Searching for them can be a heart wrenching nightmare.

The issue of putting the dog’s name on the tag is something to take into consideration. It may look nice, but there are reasons to think about whether or not you want their name and yours on their tags.

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