Category Archives: Pure Heaven

Why Do Dogs Love Stinky Smells?

By Linda Cole

One advantage we have over dogs is our ability to see things crystal clear, including a wide spectrum of colors. One of life’s simple pleasures is watching a beautiful sunset on a summer night. Dogs view their world not with their eyes but through an acute sense of smell that puts us to shame. I’m frequently amazed at how certain smells capture my dogs’ attention; even the smell of a bug or earthworm crawling through their pen. Dogs are individuals, and have special smells that get their attention more than others.

My dogs rarely beg at mealtimes because they know no matter how much they whine, they aren’t going to get any of my food. But the minute I bring out the CANIDAE Pure Heaven biscuits, I suddenly become their favorite human. It’s amazing how fast they sit and politely wait when there are goodies in my pocket. They know the smell of their favorite treats, and react with the very best manners they have. A dog’s sense of smell is so good, scientist say canines can detect most odors in concentrations of parts per trillion, which explains how my dogs know someone is grilling outside before I can smell it.

One of the things I enjoy when walking the dogs is the look of excitement on their face when they come across an interesting smell. Now, you might not think sniffing every inch of a dried up leaf would be that interesting, but it is to dogs. It might contain the scent of a mouse that crawled over it, “pee mail” from another dog, or a slime trail left by a slug or snail. There’s a whole library of information hidden in the underbrush and grass, or along a hiking trail. This smorgasbord of smells provides plenty of mental stimulation for a dog’s mind.
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The Five “Personality Types” of Dogs

By Linda Cole

The deeper researchers dig into the animal kingdom, the more we learn about the different personalities and intelligence of animals. For instance, did you know crows can recognize our faces – and remember if they were treated in a positive or negative way by a human? Our personality is one aspect of our character that defines who we are. Understanding who your dog is, based on his personality type, helps you figure out why he acts in a certain way and defines his behavior characteristics as an individual.

Like us, dogs fall into different personality types, and can show more than one type. We all know someone who’s the life of the party, someone who is quiet and reserved, or one who will do whatever is necessary to get ahead. Our canine friends fit into five types of personalities. Knowing your dog helps you ward off potential behavior issues before they get out of control when you understand how he might act in a certain situation. His development and personality is based on his upbringing, environment, breed and self esteem.

The Confident Dog is a natural born leader of the pack. He’s a team player and more than ready to take charge of a situation. A confident dog can also be dominant. Harsh discipline or training methods with this personality type could cause him to show aggressive tendencies or become more willful. This dog feels secure in his surroundings, and has a self-assuredness that shows in his body language.

The Independent Dog is more standoffish, and may not form a strong bond with an owner he doesn’t see as his leader. Some breeds are independent by nature and capable of developing a very close bond with the family member who takes control as a fair, patient and strong leader. The independent personality is perfectly happy being away from the crowd. He needs to be given space, and trying to force him to do something he doesn’t want to do will backfire. You can easily lose this dog’s trust and respect if you expose him to heavy handed treatment.

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The Courageous and Loyal Akita

By Linda Cole

In the Akita’s native country of Japan, the breed is considered a courageous and loyal national treasure. In fact, he is so loved there that an Akita statue is given to the parents of newborn babies to signify health, happiness and long life, and to the sick for a speedy recovery. The Akita is the largest of six national dog breeds of Japan. To preserve the breeds, all six were designated precious natural resources of Japan under the Cultural Properties Act of 1936, which gave the breeds official recognition and protection.

The Akita origins are in the Odate region of the Akita Prefecture, located in the northern rugged mountains on the main island of Honshu. At one time the Akita was called the Odate Dog, but the breed name was changed when the dogs were given protected status. This is an old breed descended from spitz-like dogs with a history that goes back to at least the 1600s, and possibly even farther.

A favorite of the Imperial family and ruling class, the Akita became the “royal dog” of the ruling elites, and they were the only ones who could own this powerful breed. Special leashes for each dog symbolized his rank and the importance of his owner. Elaborate ceremonies were performed for the care and feeding of the Akita. Centuries old sketches depict the breed standing with their royal owners, dressed in lavish ceremonial robes.

Bred as a hunter of big game like wild boar, elk and the huge Yezo bear, the dogs hunted in pairs, usually a male and female. The female nipped at an animal from behind while the male attacked from the front to bait their prey and hold the animal until hunters arrived. The Akita was also used as a guard dog, protecting family members and property. The bravery and size of this dog makes him a force to be reckoned with, and he continues to perform hunting and guard dog duties in his native lands. The dog can also be trained to retrieve waterfowl, and is an able and agile tracker with cat-like movements.

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DIY Crafts for Dog-Treat Jars

dog-treat-3By Langley Cornwell

When it comes to doggies and their treats, having a custom made jar is almost a requirement; after all, anything as important as a CANIDAE Pure Heaven dog treat must have a special container! How else can we expect our lovable pooches to sit up and beg? Here are some ideas for a DIY handcrafted dog-treat jar:

The first thing you need to do is find a proper container. You want something that you can seal up tight, but that you can easily open and reach into, for those moments when your pooch is doing something especially precious and requires an immediate reward. Your container should be made of glass or plastic so that it will be easy to work with when you start crafting. Glass and plastic take paint and various other things quite well, so those are excellent choices.

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Why Do Some Dogs Hate Going Outside in the Rain?

By Linda Cole

My dogs can’t wait to get outside when the weather is nice, but a rainy day is a much different story. Even when I stand outside in the rain trying to coax them out, I get a look from them that says, “You crazy human. You do know it’s raining – right?” In the end, I usually win out, thanks to patience and the natural urge that sooner or later causes a dog to begrudgingly step out into the rain to do their business.

Keikei is the only one of my dogs who prances around in the rain like Gene Kelly in the classic movie Dancing in the Rain. The other dogs tiptoe through the grass hoping this will keep their feet from getting wet.

Most dogs will resist going outside in the rain, but some don’t seem to mind if they get wet. As long as it’s not storming or coming down in buckets, you can usually coax your dog outside for a quick duty call. It’s usually a hard rain that puts the brakes on for most dogs. I can’t say I blame them, because I don’t want to stand outside when it’s raining hard any more than they do.

For some dogs, it’s not the rain that bothers them, it’s the scary thunder and lightning. One of my dogs, Shelby, has a thunder phobia. The minute the rumbles start, she’s by my side. Dogs with a storm phobia are more often herding breeds and hounds, but any dog can be afraid of storms and it can be a serious issue for an owner to deal with. Dogs scared of storms can have mild to severe reactions. They might chew on anything they can find, salivate, whine, hide, pace, shake, become destructive or aggressive, or cling to their owner for the duration of the storm.

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How to Curb Your Dog’s Enthusiasm

By Suzanne Alicie

I had to laugh when I saw this title, because I am owned by the queen of uncontrollable dogs. If someone knocks on the door, Bear will not stop barking until the person is inside and she can smell them, then she might continue barking if she feels like it. She’s not a jumper, but she sure is loud. I could probably work with her to stop this, but she’s an old dog and she’s pretty set in her ways. She isn’t harming anyone and is quite effective as a guard dog letting people know she is in the house and on the job. But not everyone can deal with this behavior in their dog, or perhaps their dog has other instances of boundless excitement and enthusiasm.

If your dog knocks you down racing out the door when you go for a walk or jumps up on guests, you may want to follow some of the advice below. It is important that you have a firm handle on control any time your dog is around people or out in public. A harness and leash does no good if your dog can drag you around willy-nilly as he chooses.

Basic obedience training is almost a must for puppies if you want them to be well behaved. Some people have the time to work with their puppies themselves, but if not then an obedience class will help. Learning basic commands such as sit, stay and quiet are imperative if you wish to control your dog when he gets excited. Whether you do this training at home with a large box of CANIDAE Pure Heaven treats and lots of patience or take your dog to a class, it is very important that he learn basic obedience commands.

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