Category Archives: rescue dog

How to Help a Scared Rescue Dog Acclimate to You

By Laurie Darroch

Adopting a rescue dog is a wonderful way to bring a new canine family member into the home. However, some rescue dogs are frightened by humans because of bad experiences with previous owners or homelessness which did not give them any bonding experience with humans. It takes patience and understanding to deal with a scared rescue dog and to help them acclimate to you and to their new home.

A skittish rescue dog may show his fear by being overly timid, withdrawn and untrusting or displaying signs of depression. Some may feel threatened by new people, situations and surroundings.

Warm Up to a New Home

When you first bring home a rescue dog, keep them confined to one area so they don’t feel so overwhelmed. Let them slowly get used to the new smells, sounds and sights around them. At first, your new rescue pet may seem jumpy, unsure and unable to relax. Keep the environment stress free for them. Use gentle commands, soft voices and quiet surroundings until they feel more at ease. They will eventually get used to the stimulation, but in the beginning, keep it a controlled non-threatening environment for them. As your dog begins to explore and perhaps timidly reach out, they will learn that your home is their home and it’s a safe place to be.

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Tips for Finding a Dog Rescue Group

By Suzanne Alicie

Although I’m not in the market for a new dog at the moment, when the time comes I will get a rescue dog. There are plenty of great dogs in need of a forever home out there. But what if you’re looking for a rescue dog to adopt, yet still want to get a purebred or a specific breed? That’s when you need to know how to find a rescue program for the type of dog you’re looking for.

Check with Breeders

Many dog breeders are approached when a dog needs a home, but they can’t take in all the dogs of a breed so they need to be able to tell people who to get in touch with for a rescue. Because breeders specialize in a specific breed, they often know a lot of people who deal with the same kind of dogs. When a person cares deeply about a breed and wants to be helpful, they will know of a reputable rescue where you can find the dog you’re looking for.

Look Online

Simply use your search engine to find rescue groups and then narrow down the search with the breed you are looking for. BUT keep in mind that not all rescues are the same. Do a little research, check out their website, and try to locate people who have worked with the rescue to make sure it is a reputable program.  Facebook is a great way to find out what people think of an organization and what their experiences have been.

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Caring for Rescued or Abused Dogs

By Eliza Wynn

Animal lovers who have adopted an abused or rescued dog know it’s one of the most rewarding things they’ve ever done. It can also be hard for first-time adopters to figure out how to make things easier for themselves and their new companions. These dogs have been through a lot, and their experiences often make them hesitant to trust people again. It’s up to the adopters to help them adjust to their new life as part of a loving family. With that in mind, here are some tips for caring for rescued or abused dogs that will help them feel safe, confident and loved.

Supply Run

Not having essential supplies when you need them is stressful, and pets pick up on that stress. Before bringing your new family member home, be prepared for the inevitable messes by having pet-safe cleaning supplies on hand. Other important items include puppy pads, grooming and first-aid supplies, chew toys, CANIDAE dog food, and a leash and collar. By preparing in advance, you’ll be more likely to stay calm when things don’t go as planned.

Home Vet Visit

As a responsible pet owner, you’ll want to have your dog’s health checked out right away. If possible, arrange to have a trusted veterinarian provide the initial exam at your home. Once your dog realizes that this new person is a friend, you can schedule future visits at the veterinary clinic.

Use a Gentle Tone

Use a gentle tone of voice whenever your dog is nearby, and always speak his name kindly. Loud voices and harsh words can be frightening, especially to a dog that’s already anxious or fearful. Use praise when appropriate, occasionally supplemented with a CANIDAE dog treat. Sing to him softly, and if this has a soothing effect, use the same song whenever he needs some extra TLC.

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8 Celebrities and Their Rescued Dogs

By Linda Cole

Celebrities have one advantage the rest of us don’t: fans and paparazzi who watch their every move. That may not seem like an advantage to those of us who have no desire to live life under a photographer’s lens. However, the attention gives celebrities an opportunity to speak out for causes that are important to them. Dog loving celebrities not only speak up for shelter dogs, many also rescue dogs from shelters.

Sandra Bullock

Not everyone is emotionally capable of caring for a disabled dog, and most special needs dogs in shelters will never find a forever home. Sandra Bullock is not only an advocate for special needs dogs, she adopted three from shelters. Poppy is a three legged Chihuahua/Pomeranian mix that Bullock adopted in 2005. Ruby is a two legged Chihuahua born without front legs. She walks around standing up straight on her back legs. BeBe, Sandra’s third special needs dog, is a one eyed Chihuahua.

Orlando Bloom

I have been a fan of Orlando Bloom for a long time. He is also a huge dog lover, and actually rescued his dog off the streets of Morocco while on location during the filming of Kingdom of Heaven. Sidi is a Saluki mix, and he goes everywhere with his famous owner.

Drew Barrymore

In 1998, a fire devastated her Beverly Hills home. Drew credits Flossie, her rescued Chow/Lab mix, with saving her life and her then husband, Tom Green. Flossie barked frantically and alerted them to the fire. Flossie crossed over the Rainbow Bridge in 2010 at the age of 16. Drew also has a 2½ year old mixed breed named Douglas, rescued from a shelter when he was six months old. He had been surrendered to the shelter when he was only two weeks old. Her other dog, a shepherd mix named Oliver, had been left in a box with his siblings outside a shelter in Los Angeles. Barrymore isn’t the only actress that has been in Oliver’s life; his foster home was with Nikki Reed of Twilight fame.

Jake Gyllenhaal

Gyllenhaal proudly named his two shelter dogs after characters in his favorite book, To Kill a Mockingbird. Atticus Finch is a German Shepherd, and Boo Radley is a Beagle/Pug mix. Atticus is Gyllenhaal’s running partner. An advocate for shelter pets, Gyllenhaal recently helped an animal rescue organization in Mississippi raise money.

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What is the True Worth of a Pet?

By Linda Cole

I once had a coworker who felt it was her duty to chastise me for rescuing stray pets and giving them a temporary home while I tried to find their owner, and then a forever home if their owner couldn’t be found. The money I spent on their vet care and food was beyond her comprehension. After months of complaining, one day she said “That’s stupid to spend your money on those cats and dogs. Just think how much money you’d have if you got rid of them.” She had no idea what I spent on them because I never talked about it, but it was what she said next that made me blow a gasket. “Just dump them in the country. No one will know.” I won’t repeat what I said to her, except to say she got an earful on what I thought about her suggestion. She had never been a pet owner and I knew I would be wasting my breath trying to explain something she couldn’t comprehend.

To me, all animals have worth and it has nothing to do with money. They are all living beings and have a right to life. To ignore a lost/stray pet that needs help with food or finding a home is not something I can do. Also, if I found a wild animal that needed help I wouldn’t hesitate to do what I could for them.

I realize the true worth of a pet is different for everyone because we don’t all have the same kind of relationship with our pets. For many of us, though, our pets give us a reason to get up in the morning. They can make a rainy day seem sunny and bright. Pets have a contagious enthusiasm for life they pass on to us, if we’re willing to take it. For other owners, their pet plays a limited role in their life and can easily be replaced. To them, it’s “just” an animal.

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The Role of Nutrition When Rehabilitating a Neglected Dog

By Langley Cornwell

It’s an obvious and sad fact that millions of homeless dogs suffer from malnutrition.

Neglected dogs often do not get enough food. When they do get food, it’s usually lacking in basic nutrients. Therefore, their inconsistent food source coupled with unreliable nourishment leads to malnutrition. Canine malnutrition is serious and, for rescue dogs, it’s a way of life due to their incomplete and unbalanced diet.

The Dog Channel outlines the price of poor canine nutrition in helpful detail. It’s clear that without a proper diet, dogs can suffer multiple physical and behavioral problems including allergies, kidney problems, bone problems, skin and coat complications and aggression.

Sure, nutrition-related problems can affect any dog regardless of background, size, or breed. But it’s seen most commonly in neglected dogs. And when it comes to rescuing a homeless animal, sound canine nutrition plays a large role in rehabilitating a previously unloved animal.

Signs of aggression caused by poor nutrition

If a dog has been eating a low-quality diet, there are several reasons he may act in an aggressive manner. One reason is a physical reaction; a dog that experiences pain or illness tends to act hostile if he is in severe discomfort. If an ailment causes a dog pain when he’s touched, he will act inappropriately. The Natural Dog Health Remedies website indicates that another reason a dog may show aggression is because he is not getting the proper nutrition required for his brain to function correctly, so his actions and reactions are unpredictable.

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