Category Archives: skin conditions

Can Dogs Get Warts?

warts wplynnBy Linda Cole

It’s not uncommon to find small lumps and bumps on your dog, and most aren’t anything to worry about. Nevertheless, it’s always a good idea to monitor any lump to make sure it doesn’t change in color or size. If it does, call your vet immediately. Warts are small growths that seem to pop up on the skin out of the blue, and like us, dogs can get warts. The question is, how concerned should you be if you find a wart on your dog?

Warts are caused by an extremely contagious virus that all dogs have probably already been exposed to. Also known as papilloma or fibropapillomas, the virus causes usually benign skin growths that can develop on the face, eyes, eyelids, mouth, genital area, lower legs, feet, on the footpads and between the toes. Dog warts look similar to the warts people get, and can grow in clusters or alone. Sometimes a wart can be smooth. The virus is passed from dog to dog, but because it’s species specific, it can’t be passed on to you or your feline friends. It’s unclear why some dogs develop warts while others don’t, but it’s likely due to a weak or immature immune system and age. The virus affects young dogs and older canines, as well as dogs with compromised immune systems.
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Bathing Tips for Dogs with a Skin Condition

bath tonyBy Langley Cornwell

If you have a dog with sensitive skin or a predisposition to skin conditions, you may have fallen into this circular trap – you need to bathe him more often because of the condition but the more you bathe him, the worse his skin condition seems to get. That’s because a regular dog bath can exacerbate his problem. Dogs with acute allergies or a propensity for other skin conditions need special care when receiving a bath.

Symptoms and Causes

In many cases, you will know if your dog is suffering from a skin condition simply by looking. Excess hair loss or bald spots are an indication of a problem, as are dry, flaky patches, scabs or rashes, lumps and bumps or anything out of the ordinary. If there are no visual indications, but you notice your dog chewing, scratching or licking himself excessively, then a skin condition may be the issue and you should make an appointment with your veterinarian to determine the cause of the skin condition and the best treatment plan.

A variety of things can cause skin conditions for dogs. The most obvious reason is fleas and/or an allergic reaction to them. Other external parasites could also be the culprit. It could be a result of an infection, hormonal or metabolic issues, allergies, yeast overgrowth, stress and boredom, or even a reaction to the shampoo or grooming products you are currently using on your pet.

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Atopic Dermatitis in Dogs and Cats

atopic daffodilsBy Linda Cole

Dermatitis is a condition that causes the skin to become inflamed. Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that causes an allergic reaction to the skin. At one time it was referred to as allergic inhalant dermatitis. It’s one of the most common skin diseases found in dogs and cats.

To soothe their itchy skin, a pet dealing with this condition will scratch and search out furniture or other things to rub up against in an effort to easy their itch. Over time, the scratching and rubbing can lead to injuries to the skin which can make it easier for other secondary infections to enter the body. It can become a vicious circle that makes a pet feel miserable.


Proteins found in the environment likely enter the body through direct contact with the skin, absorbed through the paw pads or inhaled, and possibly ingested. These proteins are called allergens once they produce an allergic response. Atopic dermatitis, also known as atopy, is an allergic reaction to common and normally harmless allergens like house dust mites, house dust, grass, ragweed, trees, mold, pollen, insect proteins, animal dander or other allergens found in the environment. Human skin or natural fibers can also be a culprit.

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Tips for Treating Dry Itchy Skin in Dogs

By Laurie Darroch

If you notice your dog incessantly scratching various parts of his body with no signs of invasive skin parasites such as fleas, he may simply have dry or itchy skin that needs basic attention to help ward off the irritation. If you have ever experienced dry itchiness on your own skin, you know how annoying it can be. The constant rubbing and scratching can make a dog start to lose patches of hair or develop sores or open wounds.


Just like you, your dog can have food allergies. Not all dog food is the same. Cheap dog food might include products that keep the price low, but that keeps the quality low as well. Your dog may suffer from poor nutrition, or their system may not be tolerating all the added fillers used in cheap dog food. Buy a good quality, healthy dog food like CANIDAE to insure they are getting the nutrients they need to maintain optimum health on the inside, as well as the ingredients necessary for a healthy skin and coat. A consistent, healthy diet helps maintain healthy skin.

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Does Poison Ivy, Oak and Sumac Affect Dogs?

By Linda Cole

Hiking a favorite trail or playing at the park may seem like a safe way to spend the day, but you may not have noticed that patch of poison ivy your dog walked through. The question is, does poison ivy, oak or sumac affect dogs, and can they give it to us?

Humans and animals can suffer the same itchy fate when exposed skin makes contact with poison ivy, oak or sumac. These plants aren’t as likely to bother cats because their coat covers them completely. Dogs on the other hand, have exposed skin on their tummy and the inside area of their back legs. The oil from these plants can also sometimes work its way through a dog or cat’s coat to the skin, causing an itchy discomfort. If you weren’t aware your pet was in contact with one of these poison plants, you might think his scratching was due to fleas.

Poison ivy is generally found in every state except Hawaii and Alaska. Poison oak is mainly found in western states; it can be found in southern states as well, but is rarely found in the Midwest. Sumac thrives in wooded, swampy areas of southern and eastern states. It’s also prevalent in wet wooded areas, like along the Mississippi River.

All three toxic plants contain an oily sap called urushiol, which causes an itchy rash and nasty blisters on the skin. Urushiol has to be absorbed through the skin before it can cause an allergic reaction. It takes longer for the oily resin to penetrate through thicker skin, which is why there can be a delay before there’s a reaction, or why it seems to spread. A rash and blisters are seen first where the skin is the thinnest, and appears on other areas as the toxin is absorbed through thicker skin. Fluid from broken blisters is not contagious and can’t infect other areas on the body because the urushiol that created the blister has already been absorbed.

If your dog or cat walks through a patch of poison ivy, oak or sumac and gets some of the resin on his coat, even if it doesn’t affect him, you can get the sap on you if he rubs against you or you pet him. Since dogs and cats are shorter, it’s very easy for them to get the oily sap on their ears, face or anywhere else on their body when hiking or just out running around in their own backyard.

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Dog Health: Preventing and Treating Calluses

By Linda Cole

If your dog is anything like mine, he probably prefers snoozing on the couch or on a comfy chair rather than on the floor. I don’t mind sharing the couch with my dogs, because the softer padding helps protect them from developing calluses. Dogs can get calluses on their elbows and other areas of the body, just like we get them on our feet or hands. They aren’t life threatening and usually don’t bother the dog, but they can become a problem if they turn into sores. If you see gray, bare spots on your dog’s elbow, those are calluses. These can be prevented and treated.

Calluses form on a dog’s elbows, hips, and other areas of the body when the dog sleeps on hard surfaces – basically any place on their body where they are resting on a bony area. Calluses are sometimes called pressure sores and can turn into an abscess or an ulcer. Larger dogs are more susceptible to developing calluses, but any dog that spends too much time sleeping or laying on a hard surface can get them.

Summer is a prime time for dogs to develop calluses because they seek out the coolest area they can find to take a snooze. Cement located under a shade tree is a favorite resting spot because the cool surface feels good to them. Shaded decks and tile blocks are also great places to lie on during the summer. Dogs that pick hard surfaces to sleep on should have their elbows, hips and legs inspected regularly.

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