Category Archives: stacy mantle

Earth Day is April 22, 2009

Earth Day is upon us and CANIDAE All Natural Pet Foods is committed not only to pets, but to our environment as well. So, what’s all the ruckus about? Well, to keep it simple – Earth Day was designed to bring awareness of our world into our living room. The protection of our animals, as well as our pets, comes down to our commitment in saving our environment.
 
Did You Know?
  • The patron Saint of ecologists is St. Francis, who also happens to be the patron saint of animals.
  • Earth Day is celebrated in more than 175 countries.
  • After Christmas and Halloween, Earth Day is the largest celebrated holiday in schools.
  • Recycling one aluminum can saves enough energy to watch TV for three hours –the equivalent of a half gallon of gasoline.
  • More than 20 million Hershey’s Kisses are wrapped each day – 133 square miles of tinfoil. All that foil is recyclable.
  • The Peace Bell, made from coins donated by school-children to further peace on our planet, is rang every Earth Day at the United Nations.
  • More than 100 billion plastic bags are thrown away each year in the U.S., the equivalent of dumping 12 million barrels of oil. More than 1 million birds and 100,000 marine mammals and sea turtles die each year from them.
  • If all U.S. households installed water-efficient appliances, we would save more than 3 trillion gallons of water and more than $18 billion per year.
  • Plastic doesn’t biodegrade so it can persist for centuries. All the plastic that has ever been made on earth is still around and will exist long after we’re gone.
  • In 2007, 56 percent of the paper consumed in the U.S. was recovered for recycling — an all-time high. That’s nearly 360 pounds of paper for each man, woman, and child.
Find out where the nearest Earth Day celebration is to you and learn what you can do to help the environment that we all count on!  Visit the Earth Day website today.

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The personal opinions and/or use of trade, corporate or brand names, is for information and convenience only. Such use does not constitute an endorsement by CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods of any product or service. Opinions are those of the individual authors and not necessarily of CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods.

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Spring Flowers and Sick Animals

Spring is in the air and for many of us – it’s planting season. What type of flower garden is the best for you and your pets? 
Many flowers are toxic to our favorite felines and canines, and it is important to be informed on which plants to avoid when you have pets. 
Spring Flowers
During this time of the year, you really want to avoid common Easter plants such as lilies, chrysanthemums, crocus and tulips. These plants can cause severe abdominal pain, excessive drooling, and even death. Crocus and amaryllis are two more to avoid this year.
You’ll want to avoid Castor bean plants, which produce a toxin known as Ricin and can be life-threatening. Kalanchoe is another no-no around pets, and those beautiful Oleander trees are toxic as well. Oleander can even cause heart problems, hypothermia and death. The Sago Palm, one of my personal favorites, is also toxic to dogs and cats, causing liver failure, depression and seizures.
Indoors or Out!
Azaleas or flowers of the Rhododendron family contain grayantoxins, which can produce vomiting, drooling, diarrhea, weakness and depression of the central nervous system, so stay away from those. Cyclamen has a similar effect. Schefflera, Pothos and Brassaia actinophylla are toxic as well, so stay away from those too.
What can you grow safely around pets? 
Stay tuned for the next update and we’ll share the ten best plants for pets and families.

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The personal opinions and/or use of trade, corporate or brand names, is for information and convenience only. Such use does not constitute an endorsement by CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods of any product or service. Opinions are those of the individual authors and not necessarily of CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods.

Planting Pet Friendly Gardens

Gardening with Pets
You might think it’s not possible to have dogs and cats, as well as a garden, whether that garden is indoors or out. But, you can have the best of both worlds if you are willing to follow some simple rules. 
Safety First: Be very cautious about soil and fertilizer. Many organic fertilizers are made out of bone meal, blood meal or fish emulsion, which can smell like dinner to a curious dog or cat. 
Minimize Mulch: If you have a dog, avoid cocoa bean mulch in the garden or keep your dog in areas of the yard where you don’t use this mulch. Safer alternatives include bark, grass clippings and fall leaves. 
Location, Location, Location: Plan your garden. Your goal is to keep pets out, keep plants in. This can be done by simply planning the layout of your garden. Plant hearty, thick perennials along the outer border so if Fido oversteps his boundaries, he’s not doing any damage. The more delicate plants should be in the center of the garden. 
Keep Kitty At Bay: Cats go wild for catnip (Nepeta catoria), which is a member of the Mint family. Catmint (Nepeta faassenii and related species) is another favorite. Fortunately, both are tough plants that seem able to withstand feline attention, so keep them in a separate area away from your garden, or on the outskirts of the garden. On that same note, avoid having any bare areas of soil around the garden. While it may look nice to humans, it is simply too tempting as a litter box to the stray passerby. 
When In Doubt, Fence It: Occasionally, it’s just easier to fence the area off. If you have a very determined feline or very nosy pup, it’s best to just fence the area off.
Following these simple rules will help alleviate your frustration, keep your pets safe, and if you’re lucky – discourage other pets from entering. If you continue to have problems, we’ll be addressing that in an upcoming issue of Responsible Pet Ownership.

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The personal opinions and/or use of trade, corporate or brand names, is for information and convenience only. Such use does not constitute an endorsement by CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods of any product or service. Opinions are those of the individual authors and not necessarily of CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods.

The History of Dog

The ancestry of the dog can be traced back as far as sixty million years. Beginning with the Miatis, the small weasel-like creature is thought to have demonstrated the first characteristics of the animal now recognized as Canis lupus familiaris, or “dog” to you and me. It is this creature that evolved into the earliest wolf.
Every dog we have was bred over centuries to create what we now know as breeds. And guess what? The new “designer breeds” are just more attempts at breeding the perfect mutt.
And yet, all are a result of… you guessed it – the wolf.
Even the most popular purebred is actually a crossbreed. A Yorkshire terrier was crossed with an Australian terrier to produce the Silky Terrier. The Bulldog was crossed with a Mastiff to get a Bullmastiff. The Doberman is a result of a German shepherd being crossed with a German Pinscher, and later crosses with the Greyhound, Weimeraner and Black and Tan Manchester terrier further refined the breed.
So when you think about spending thousands of dollars on a “purebred dog” or a “designer breed”, take a deep breath, cleanse your mind, and walk on over to your local shelter. Chances are good, they have the “designer” type you want and no breeding is necessary….

The personal opinions and/or use of trade, corporate or brand names, is for information and convenience only. Such use does not constitute an endorsement by CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods of any product or service. Opinions are those of the individual authors and not necessarily of CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods.

Mixed Up Mutts, Designer Dog Breeds

Recently, there’s been a lot of talk about designer breeds, dogs that are “designed” or “bred” to obtain a specific result. An example might be the “Labradoodle”, a supposedly hypo-allergenic dog. You can either go online and buy one for thousands of dollars or you can take a drive down to your local shelter and find one for less than $100. 
I’m a big fan of designer breeds. In fact, I have three in my office with me right now – Roscoe is a Beagledor (essentially a 60 lb beagle), Cheiss is a Chaussie (Australian shepherd and chow), and of course Tristan is a Wolote (a very rare, coyote/wolf/shepherd). 
The cool thing about designer breeds is you get to name them yourself! 
“Designer Breeds”
I watched some people in the park the other day. A woman was watching a beautiful dog chase and successfully catch every ball his owner threw. The dog dove into the lake like a champ, refused to chase the ducks, and was in all – a perfect canine gentleman. She approached the owner, asking what breed the dog was and where she could find one of her own.
The man proudly proclaimed, “Why, he’s an Aussiedor! A rare, very expensive breed. In fact, there are only two breeders in the US that I’m aware of.” He went on to pass along the contact information for his breeder and the woman left, anxious to begin her hunt. 
And yet, he’s simply describing a dog that is a mix between an Australian Shepherd and a Labrador. I was at the shelter yesterday where I saw three of them…. Each was adoptable that day for $85, yet she’ll likely pay a breeder over $1,000 if she doesn’t do her homework. 
What’s In A Name? 
They sound lovely and exotic. And expensive. Here are just a few examples: 
Ba-Shar (Basset Hound crossed with a Shar-pei)
Brusselranian (Brussels Griffon crossed with a Pomeranian),
Corillion (Papillon crossed with a Pembroke Welsh Corgi)
Imo-Inu (American Eskimo crossed with a Shiba Inu) 
Wee-Chon (Bichon Frise crossed with a Westie) 
What kind of designer dog do you have? Leave us a comment and tell us all about it!

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The personal opinions and/or use of trade, corporate or brand names, is for information and convenience only. Such use does not constitute an endorsement by CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods of any product or service. Opinions are those of the individual authors and not necessarily of CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods.

Snake Aversion Therapy for Dogs

Spring is in the air and with this beautiful season follows the arrival of rattlesnakes. If you live in the US, you’ve probably had at least one experience with snakes, and if you live in the Southwest, you’ve probably had a few. 
If you’re out hiking with your dog and stumble across a rattler, what is the best course of action? First off, you should have your dog on a leash at all times – even while on a trailhead. This will help, but oftentimes, it won’t be enough. Snakes have a tendency to lie across the trail or out in the open where they can absorb the heat from the sun. They can be difficult to see if you’re not paying attention, so try to always pay attention. 
If you’re dog attacks or doesn’t see it in time, and is struck by the snake, try not to panic. Get out of there, and if possible, carry your dog out. Adrenaline will increase heart rate, which will increase the spread of poison. Chances are good that your dog was struck in the throat, and if that’s the case, you need to ensure he or she can breathe. The poison will cause intense swelling, which can close off your dog’s airway. Get him or her to the vet as soon as humanly possible. Do not stop and try to suck out the poison (it doesn’t work and can end up killing you). Just get to a vet. 
Of course, the best thing to do is teach your dog to avoid snakes altogether. This can be done through a series of snake aversion training by a certified trainer. 
There are many ways to train a dog to avoid snakes, but aversion therapy is one of the best I’ve seen. Yes, it uses static electricity collars. Yes, it’s difficult to watch. Yes, it will likely save your dog’s life in the long run. The good thing is that it only needs to be done once in most cases. It’s a lesson they’ll remember for the rest of their lives. 
A good trainer will teach dogs to avoid snakes using sight, sound and smell. Ensure that the trainer you use has a long line of references and positive feedback from previous clients. They will lead your dog through a “rattlesnake” course, using snakes that have been rescued from the backyards of terrified homeowners. The snakes should later be released into the wild – ensure you find a humane trainer who handles the snakes humanely. 
Depending on the dogs reaction, there are several events that can occur. These depend on the training methods used. Snake aversion therapy is one of the few training events I would ever use a collar for, because it’s that important for the dog to associate a strong reaction with seeing or hearing or smelling a snake. 
If you’re interested in taking your dog in for “snake aversion” therapy, check your local listings for a qualified, accomplished trainer who offers humane methods of training. Ensure that they treat the “volunteer snakes” well, and you’ll be in good shape. 
It might just save your dog’s life….
ASPCA Poison Control Hotline
1-888-426-4435
Note:  There is a $60 charge for this service.
The National Animal Poison Control Center (NAPPC)
1-800-548-2423
1-900-680-0000
Note: If you call the 1-900 number, the charge is $20.00 for the first five minutes, then $2.95/minute thereafter. If you use the 800 number, the charge is $30.00 per case.

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The personal opinions and/or use of trade, corporate or brand names, is for information and convenience only. Such use does not constitute an endorsement by CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods of any product or service. Opinions are those of the individual authors and not necessarily of CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods.