Category Archives: Suzanne Alicie

Home Remedy Flea Treatments: Fact or Myth?

By Suzanne Alicie

Our dog Bear is a big fluffy dog, and fleas love her. Every year around the start of spring we begin to notice her scratching and chewing a bit and immediately give her a bath. For some reason the fleas seem to thrive after that bath making her miserable. Julia Williams tackled a few of the myths about fleas that many folks believe. Now it’s time to see about some of the home remedy myths concerning fleas. While fleas can be a hassle, it is all part of responsible pet ownership.

We have tried all sorts of home remedies and over the counter topical treatments, and have found that there is some truth to nearly all the rumors about what works but that it really takes a combination of things to get rid of the fleas on our dog and the ones that invade our house each year around this time. After all, it does no good to get the fleas off of Bear if there are fleas in the house to jump back on her.  So, here is a brief recounting of my experience with home remedies for fleas.

Dawn original blue dish detergent is said to be quite effective on fleas and is gentle on a dog’s skin. We actually use Dawn to bathe the dog quite often and yes, it does kill the fleas that are alive on her at the time. I’m assuming that has more to do with drowning and less to do with any sort of chemical death because it doesn’t seem to affect the eggs and doesn’t repel fleas after the bath.

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Accommodating an Old Dog

By Suzanne Alicie

I wrote an article a short time ago about living with an older dog. Our Bear is definitely showing her age, and many times her irritability makes it hard to do anything that helps her feel better. If you have an older dog, you may want to start making some changes around your home that will make life easier for them. I like to think of it like dealing with an elderly person who doesn’t want to admit there are things bothering them. Changes are made gradually and are designed to give them a choice without any attention drawn to the easier choices when they begin making them.

While your dog may have always flopped down for a nap wherever he felt like it, you can make it more comfy by placing therapeutic “egg carton foam mattress” dog beds in their favorite places. Bear has a hidey hole in the bathroom where she likes to lay away from the hustle and bustle of the house. She also has her spot next to our bed when she’s too stiff to go underneath it, and a spot beside the couch where she lays when she’s feeling sociable. Her cushioned beds in those places are new additions that make her favorite napping spots more comfortable, easier on her joints and warmer.

If your dog has trouble with the stairs, there are a few things you can do. Non-slip mats on the stairs will help your dog balance out unsteady steps without fear of slipping and falling. Moving food and water to a place where your dog spends most of her time can help cut down on the trips up and down the stairs. We have a terrible set of spiral stairs that are difficult for humans to navigate. Bear has always flown up and down them much faster than me, but now she tends to stumble and stops midway to rest. I worry constantly about her falling down the steps. My better half has declared that when Bear is unable to manage the steps he will build her a slide. My job is to make sure that does not happen – I don’t want her sliding to the basement, so I am making it more comfortable for her on the main level of the house. If everything she needs is upstairs, she won’t need to go down the steps.

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Christmas Safety for Dogs

By Bear, canine guest blogger

Hi all, it’s me Bear. I’m taking over the post today so Mommy can work on getting ready for the holidays. She discovered that she is the only person in town who doesn’t decorate on the weekend after Thanksgiving, so today she’s crawling around in the attic pulling out decorations and cleaning the house.

I love the flashing lights and the yummy smells of the holidays, but there are some things that responsible pet owners need to know about the dangers of Christmas for their dogs. So I’m here to give y’all a little rundown and some warnings that will help all you doggy Mommies and Daddies keep my canine pals happy and healthy this Christmas.

Poinsettias

Those really pretty flowers that appear around the holidays and make your holiday décor really pop are also really bad for dogs (and cats). We dogs don’t usually go around chewing house plants like those silly cats do, but sometimes we do like to check things out. The sap from poinsettias is very irritating to our mouths and stomachs and can make us really sick. You don’t want to have to clean up doggie vomit under your Christmas tree, do you? Keep poinsettias up high and make sure that you pick up the little seeds and leaves that fall off of them.

There are actually a lot of flowers and plants that are poisonous to dogs and cats; you may as well check out the list and make sure that no matter what time of year it is, you aren’t unintentionally exposing your furry friends to danger.

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America’s Top Large Dog Breeds

By Suzanne Alicie

While there are several well known giant breeds of dog available, some folks just want a “big” dog, not necessarily a giant dog. Large dog breeds are thought of as fun and playful while also being quite capable of guarding and protecting their families. For folks like me who love big dogs, the list is quite extensive. Here are four large dog breeds that are popular in America:

For the past 22 years, the Labrador Retriever has been the #1 dog on the American Kennel Club’s Most Popular Dogs list. Labs are intelligent, friendly, loyal and playful. They are good with children and require very little grooming, which makes them an ideal large dog for families.

German Shepherds are often used as police dogs because they are very effective security animals. However, they are also very loyal and loving, playful and gentle. Some of my favorite photos on the internet are from a Facebook group called the German Shepherd Dog Community which features members’ dogs cuddling with their kids, other dogs and even kitties. If you’re looking for a large and loving dog that will protect his family, then you can’t go wrong with a German Shepherd.

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Big Dogs Get a Fresh Start at Gentle Ben’s Rescue

By Suzanne Alicie

There are numerous dog rescues that are worthy of mention. Today we are showing our appreciation and spreading the word about Gentle Ben’s Giant Breed Rescue. I was able to catch up with the very busy Noreen from Gentle Ben’s and ask her a few questions. The more I learned about this program, the more enamored I became of it. I love the idea of rescuing big dogs and fostering them in the home.

Gentle Ben’s Giant Breed Rescue is a non-profit 501 C (3) large breed dog rescue located in west Pennsylvania. They take in unwanted large breed dogs that may end up in shelters or are abandoned through no fault of their own. The rescue also helps families who have lost jobs, lost homes or have medical conditions which make it impossible for them to keep their beloved pet. Dogs are welcomed into Gentle Ben’s home, provided with veterinary care and given lots of love and reassurance. The families in these situations are kept up to date with emails and photos of their pet. When a dog is taken in it becomes part of the family whether it comes from a loving home or has been abandoned. Either way, the goal is to nurture and love the dog to keep him happy and healthy.

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Explaining Responsible Pet Ownership to Children

By Suzanne Alicie

This is a topic that is near and dear to my heart. Too many parents want to make sure their child receives a pet when they ask for it and just don’t have the heart to say no if finances or living situations are not ideal for owning a pet. In this case the pet suffers. If you are going to have a pet, it is vital that you understand and explain responsible pet ownership to children – and this is also an important part of the explanation of why they may not be able to have a pet at any given time.

It is a pet peeve of mine to see a family with a toddler get a pet and not teach the child to respect the animal. Tail pulling, carrying them improperly and playing rough with pets is not proper care and may lead to the pet defending itself and then being removed from the home as if it did something wrong. Teaching your children to care for pets can begin early in their lives and will require your attention and supervision.

Pets require more than just a place to live. They need attention, healthy food like CANIDAE and medical care just like your children. If you do get a pet your children will need several lessons on the various aspects of responsible pet ownership in order to learn to respect and appreciate the pet as a family member and to care for it properly with your help.

Children of all ages can understand that being hungry and thirsty mean you need to eat or drink, but they need to be taught how much food and water your pet should have and when to feed it. Explain to them that just as they have breakfast, lunch and dinner as well as snacks, the pet also needs to have regular meals and treats. This is one of the first responsibilities that children can assist with when you have a new pet.

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