Category Archives: Veterinarians

How to Decipher the Coded Language of Vets

vetspeak  HaPe_GeraBy Linda Cole

Veterinarians have their own coded language that pet owners may have to try to decipher. “Vetspeak” can be confusing, but if we don’t comprehend everything a vet tells us, it’s up to us to ask questions so we can understand what’s wrong with our pet and follow the directions for medication and care. Some of the more common terminology you might hear at the vet or read on a prescription label is listed below.

ADR – This is an acronym that means “ain’t doing right.” When seen on a report or heard, it’s an indication that a pet isn’t doing as well as they could be or not as well as a vet expected. The phrase describes a pet with symptoms that have yet to be diagnosed. You might take your dog or cat in for a checkup if you’ve noticed he isn’t eating like he usually does or isn’t acting like himself. Everything may be alright, but it’s always a good idea to have a pet checked out anytime he isn’t acting like normal. It could be a serious problem that’s just beginning.

BDLD – You may see this abbreviation if your dog had a run in with another dog. It means “big dog/little dog” and indicates the severity and type of injuries a smaller dog may have from an encounter with a bigger dog.

BID – This is actually three Latin words – “bis in die” – that mean if your pet requires medication it’s to be given twice daily. TID means three times a day, and QID means four times daily.

Read More »

EmailGoogle GmailBlogger PostTwitterFacebookGoogle+PinterestShare

How Do You Know if Your Vet is a Keeper?

By Julia Williams

Of all the things we can do to help our pets live long and happy lives, finding a great veterinarian is definitely near the top of the list. Because we rely on their expertise for basic pet care as well as emergencies, it’s vital to find a vet that both you and your pet are comfortable with, and one that you’re confident will help you make the best decisions for your pet. It can be a challenge, though – just as it can be to find the right doctor for your own healthcare needs. There are many factors that determine whether your pet’s vet is a keeper. Here are some:

Bedside Manner

The way your vet interacts and communicates with you is an important aspect of the relationship. Visits to the vet are often stressful because we are worried about our pet’s health. A good vet will be compassionate and will try to make you feel at ease. They also need to have excellent communication skills, and be able to clearly explain treatment options, test results, medications, at-home procedures and other things relating to your pet’s care. Your vet should also have a good bedside manner with your pet; you should feel as though they really care about your pet.

Willing to Explain

A vet who rushes through the exam as though their primary concern is adhering to a predetermined time limit for the visit, regardless of what might ail your pet, is definitely NOT a keeper. You may be ushered out before you feel your concerns were really heard or before you have a thorough understanding of your pet’s health or care. If any veterinarian makes you feel that way, walk out and never go back.

A good vet takes the time to give you all the information you need to make an informed decision about different treatment options. They explain what the risks or side effects are, what a particular procedure entails and what they feel is the best course of action for your situation.

Read More »

A Quick History of Veterinary Medicine

vet history bainbridgeBy Linda Cole

Modern day veterinarians have an essential role in the health and welfare of our pets, as well as livestock and wildlife. Vets are well-versed in the science of animal health, and they promote public health by identifying and combating infectious zoonotic diseases that can be passed from animals to humans. Advances in medical science have provided veterinary professionals with sophisticated equipment, tests, procedures and medicines to treat our pets. However, the history of veterinary science dates back much further than you may realize.

The first known people to dabble in the field of veterinary medicine began around 9000 BC in Middle East countries including Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Iran, Turkey and Iraq. Sheepherders had a crude understanding of medical skills which were used to treat their dogs and other animals. From 4000 to 3000 BC, Egyptians took earlier medical skills and made further advancements. Historical records and Egyptian hieroglyphs record how they used herbs to treat and promote good health in domesticated animals.

Vedic literature, which was written around 1500 BC, refers to four sacred texts from India written in the Sanskrit language that forms the basis of the Hindu religion. The Kahun Papyrus from Egypt dates back to 1900 BC. Both texts are likely the first written accounts of veterinary medicine. One of the sacred texts documents India’s first Buddhist king, Asoka, who ensured there were two kinds of medicine: one for humans and one for animals. If he discovered there was no medicine available for one or the other, he ordered healing herbs to be bought and planted where they were needed.

Read More »

How to Choose the Right Vet


By Julia Williams

Vet visits are not overly pleasant for any animal or owner, but they are an essential aspect of responsible pet ownership. Like us, our pets can get sick or have an accident, and they also need routine care such as yearly “checkups,” teeth cleanings and immunizations. As such, it’s very important to find a veterinarian that you and your pet are comfortable with. You’ll want to feel confident that the vet and their support staff are knowledgeable, capable and dependable. You’ll want to trust that whenever your pet needs medical care, they will be in good hands. In doing so, you’ll minimize the stress of a vet visit for both you and your pet.

How to Find a Vet

For obvious reasons, the ideal time to find a good vet is before your pet needs one. If you’re moving to a new city, or you’re unhappy with your current vet, it’s important to spend some time researching the possibilities. Begin by asking friends, family members, co-workers and neighbors with pets who their vet is. But don’t stop there. Ask them what they specifically like about their vet and why they would recommend them. Be wary if they chose their vet mainly because they were close by, or from a yellow page ad. While this doesn’t necessarily mean the clinic isn’t a good one, you should do more research before entrusting them with the care of your beloved pet.

Before you commit to a new vet, it’s a good idea to schedule a short visit with them. In addition to speaking with the vet and their support staff, you should assess things like cleanliness, procedures, prices and demeanor. If your pet has existing health concerns, discussing them during this visit will help you determine whether this clinic will be able to treat them. Vet clinics are busy places and may not have a lot of time to spend with you on a “meet and greet,” but if they are open to having you as a new client they should be willing to see you briefly.

Things to Consider When Choosing a Vet

Before you visit a vet clinic, think about your pet’s needs, as well as your own. If your pet has health issues or special needs, it’s critical to find a vet who can adequately treat them. Do you need a vet who specializes in (or has extensive experience with) such things like dermatology or geriatrics? Do you prefer a vet whose practice is strictly traditional, or one who integrates holistic care with conventional treatments? What services does the facility offer? For example, if your pet needs an x-ray, surgery, dental work or lab tests, can these be done there, or will you need to go elsewhere?

Is the vet clinic in a convenient location, and are their hours agreeable? Does the place look inviting, inside and out? Is the reception room tidy, and is the receptionist well groomed and friendly? If there is more than one vet at the clinic, will you be able to see the same one each time you visit? If not, does it matter to you? What are the clinic’s procedures for emergencies on nights and weekends?

Will they allow you to make payments should you incur a large bill, or will they demand payment immediately? This can be an important consideration, because life sometimes hands us more than we can handle financially. Many years ago, I had a wonderful vet who let me pay off my balance one month at a time, without any guilt trips. Conversely, I once had to visit an emergency vet clinic that wouldn’t let me leave with my cat until I figured out a way to pay their $800 bill on the spot (needless to say, I never went back there).

Does your vet have good communication skills, and are they personable? Your vet needs to be able to clearly explain treatment options, test results and other important things related to your pet’s care. They also need to be willing to listen to you and answer any questions you may have. Just as with human doctors, a vet’s “bedside manner” should make you feel at ease.

Pay attention to how the vet and their support staff interact with your pet. It’s equally important to watch how your pet responds to the staff, because animals are incredibly intuitive. Speaking of intuition, if anything makes you uncomfortable about a particular vet or their place of business, trust your gut, because in my experience it is never wrong.

Choosing the right vet takes time and effort. You may need to visit several vet clinics before you find the one that best fits your needs. But considering all the love and joy your pet gives you, don’t they deserve the best possible care in return?

Read more articles by Julia Williams

The personal opinions and/or use of trade, corporate or brand names, is for information and convenience only. Such use does not constitute an endorsement by CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods of any product or service. Opinions are those of the individual authors and not necessarily of CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods.

CANIDAE Helps Future Veterinarians

By Ruthie Bently

CANIDAE isn’t only interested in the quality of your pet’s food. They are also interested in helping you keep your pet healthy. To that end, for the second year in a row, CANIDAE will award four veterinary medicine scholarships this year. These scholarships will be awarded in June, and each winning recipient will receive $2,500.

CANIDAE, in its goal to raise awareness of the responsibilities of pet ownership, established these scholarships in 2008. The scholarship program is open to full-time first and second year graduate students who are currently enrolled in a doctorate of veterinary medicine program at an approved college of veterinary medicine in either the United States or Canada.

To maintain a standard of confidentiality and impartiality, the selection committee is comprised of educators chosen by International Scholarship and Tuition Services, Inc. of Nashville, Tennessee. The selection committee will evaluate the applications and choose the winners.

The scholarships are based on a history of the applicants’ dedication to the well being of animals as well as a strong academic achievement, and they are also required to write an essay. The essays they are required to write are based on the same areas that are important to CANIDAE. These include: training and exercise, proper veterinary care, healthy pet nutrition, spaying and neutering, planned breeding, and the support of reputable breeders and rescue groups.

The winners of the 2008 CANIDAE Doctor of Veterinary Medicine Scholarship Program were: Katja Lang, who is attending Cornell University and is from Ithaca, New York; Rachel Lawn, who is attending Kansas State University and is from Manhattan, Kansas; Kristen Davignon, who is attending Washington State University and is from Seattle, Washington; and Rachel Purvis, who is attending the University of Prince Edward Island and is from Brockville, Ontario Canada.

The application period for this year’s scholarships closed on April 15, 2009; the winners will be announced on CANIDAE’s website approximately two months after the close of the application period. The winning applicants will be notified on or about June 16, 2009.

Read more articles by Ruthie Bently

Find CANIDAE Retailers Near You!

The personal opinions and/or use of trade, corporate or brand names, is for information and convenience only. Such use does not constitute an endorsement by CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods of any product or service. Opinions are those of the individual authors and not necessarily of CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Foods.