Category Archives: working dogs

Stabyhoun: A Calm and Intelligent Breed from the Netherlands

staby mjk2By Linda Cole

Considered a rare breed, this versatile, hard working farm dog has slowly gained a following in the United States. The Stabyhoun isn’t recognized by the American Kennel Club at this time, but was accepted into the Foundation Stock Service in 2005, and will be in the Sporting Group once the breed is officially recognized. However, the Staby is recognized by the United Kennel Club. This isn’t a herding dog, but has been described as like a Border Collie – with an off switch.

The Stabyhoun, pronounced Stah BAY hoon, originated in the northeastern region of the Netherlands in a province called Friesland during the Spanish occupation from 1568-1648. During this time, Spaniards crossed their spaniels with local pointing dogs to produce a well rounded, gentle yet tenacious and smart farm and hunting dog. Affectionately known as the Staby or Bijke in his native country, the breed name translates from the Dutch phrase “sta me bij hond” which means “stand by me dog.” That’s a job this dog is more than willing to do. The breed has also been known as Friese Stabij or Friesian Pointer, and the breed name is sometimes spelled Stabijhoun.

This breed belonged solely to poor farmers who could only support one dog. He earned his keep by helping out around the farm wherever he was needed. With a keen nose and sharp eyes, the Staby was an excellent duck and upland bird hunter. He was a capable pointer and soft-mouthed retriever, and an excellent swimmer even in cold water. Today, few hunters utilize the Stabyhouns hunting skills, and most have found a comfortable life as a friendly, loyal and affectionate family pet.

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Baily, the Baja Horse Ranch Dog

Baily 3By Laurie Darroch

Baily the Baja Horse Ranch Dog was born in a home in Brentwood, California, a suburb of the San Francisco Bay Area. It is a far cry from her current residence on a growing desert horse ranch near the Sea of Cortez in Mexico.

When my friend Lynn adopted Baily as a small puppy, it was obvious this Australian Shepherd/Queensland Heeler mix was a different kind of dog, meant for a very special active life. She was meant to be a working dog. Beginning at six weeks old, her owner began training the energetic dog.

Baily is not a dog who likes solitude. She needs to be with her people and her animals. From the beginning she went to work with her human companions and was rarely left alone. The high energy and highly intelligent dog needs something to do to keep all that energy focused in a productive, healthy way.

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The Different Bloodlines of the German Shepherd

german shep gomaBy Linda Cole

The German Shepherd is hands down one of the most versatile dog breeds around. This is an intelligent breed capable of doing a wide variety of jobs. The original job of the dog was as a multi-purpose herder that could protect the flock, home and family, and be a companion pet at the end of the day. However, a split occurred that took the breed in two very different directions and created an American bloodline and a German bloodline.

Captain Max von Stephanitz is the German breeder who developed the German Shepherd dog. He wanted to create a smart, strong, courageous, protective and adaptable herding dog capable of doing his job and then returning home to his family to play with the children. Von Stephanitz was interested in the working ability of the breed, and everything he did was to preserve the characteristics and traits of the dog he developed.

In 1899, he mixed early versions of shepherd dogs to come up with the Deutsche Schäferhunde, the German Shepherd dog, and wrote the standard for the breed in 1901. Soon after, von Stephanitz created a test to evaluate each dog’s herding ability, and Schutzhund to measure their mental stability, protection ability, courage, willingness to work and obedience. Both tests determine if a dog is a good candidate to use in a breeding program. Any German Shepherd bred in Germany and Europe to this day must earn a Schutzhund I title or a certificate in herding in order to be used in breeding.

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Today is K-9 Veteran’s Day

By Julia Williams

“They served to save, and they deserve to be remembered.”

Did you know that March 13th is K9 Veteran’s Day in many cities and states across the U.S.? It’s true. A movement was started by Joe White, a former military dog handler, to recognize the efforts and sacrifices of our canine heroes. The quote above is their motto.

During Joe’s time in Vietnam, he saw canine heroes perform many vital tasks that no human could. He witnessed firsthand just how valuable these dogs were to our troops and how much they contributed to keeping our soldiers safe.

Many of these courageous canines lost their lives to protect and serve, but their only place of remembrance, until now, was in the hearts of the soldiers. Joe’s home state of Florida was the first to proclaim March 13th as K9 Veteran’s Day.

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Dog Breed Profile: The Intelligent and Adorable Pumi

By Suzanne Alicie

There are some dogs that, when they look at you, their personality just shines from their face. This is true of the Pumi. If you’re looking for an adorable fur baby that is loyal and fun, then look no further. If you want a dog that is intelligent, eager to please and excels in agility and working tasks, then a Pumi also fits that description. This is a truly well rounded breed that makes an excellent pet and a great working dog. Since I’m not a very active person, I’m pretty sure it’s a good thing I’ve only seen photos of the Pumi breed, because I know that if I looked into one of those lovable, expressive faces I would want to take the dog home!

The Pumi is a Hungarian herding breed that originated in the 17th and 18th centuries as an adapted version of the ancestral Puli breed. These dogs were used to herd farm animals including sheep, goats and pigs. They were very versatile and intelligent on the job, being equally useful for gathering, driving and keeping stock within boundaries.

Not a large dog, the Pumi is a square shaped breed, meaning that the height at the withers is the same as the distance from the prosternum to the buttocks. They are typically between 15 to 18 inches tall and weigh between 22 to 29 pounds, with the males being on the larger end of these ranges.

The Pumi has been recorded in the Foundation Stock Service classification since 2001, but the breed has been recognized around the world as show dogs, agility dogs and working dogs for many years.

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The Amazing Loyalty of Guardian and Herding Breeds

By Linda Cole

There are very few dog breeds that aren’t loyal to an owner who has earned their trust and respect.  Stubbornness and independence are common characteristics in many breeds, along with the ability to think for themselves. But when it comes to loyalty, it’s the herding and livestock guardian breeds that display a unique devotion to those they bond with.

One trait wolves passed on to domesticated dogs was a strong sense of loyalty to their pack members – their family. In the early history of our relationship with dogs, warring humans utilized the size, aggressiveness and loyalty of large dogs to fight alongside soldiers on the battlefield. Since that time, dogs used in battle have been refined and tempered through selective breeding to fit into our more civilized world.

Guardian dogs, however, have remained much like they were when they were first created centuries ago to guard flocks from large predators. It’s thought that most livestock guardian dogs (LGD) are descendants of the extinct Molossus dog. These dogs were mastiff-like, big, powerful, courageous and loyal. Because guardian dogs are usually large breeds, it’s essential to make sure they get a proper diet formulated especially for big dogs, like the CANIDAE Life Stages Large Breed formulas for puppies and adults.

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