How to Improve your Dog’s Focus

By Langley Cornwell

There is a funky little strip of shops near our house. A popular local coffee shop, a Mexican taqueria, and an artisanal bakery are in this strip along with many other laid-back destinations. The area also houses one of the most well-respected boutique pet shops in town, which is the place my friends and I buy our CANIDAE PURE dog food.

I don’t know if it’s because of the pet shop, because of the bistro tables and chairs lining the fronts of the shops, or because of the relaxed nature of the patrons, but I’d guess one out of every three people that hangs out in the area has a dog with them. I always marvel at these dogs; how they’ll sit quietly under a table while their humans sip a coffee or enjoy a taco, how they’ll walk, unbothered, right past other dogs or children or skateboarders or runners.

Frankly, I’m jealous. If you have dogs you can do these types of things with, kudos to you. We don’t, not by any means. We are working on it, though. It all starts with learning how to desensitize your dog and maintain his attention in any situation.

Some dogs are raised in bustling cities and gradually become accustomed to loud sounds, people milling around and general commotion. Their composure develops via a steady, deliberate exposure to the chaos often found on urban streets. We don’t believe our dogs were raised that way. In fact, we have no idea how our dogs were raised since we rescued them when they were well past puppyhood. Once they were safely in our care, we made the mistake of doing all of their training in our house and in our yard; places that were familiar to them and didn’t hold many distractions.

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Do Cats Watch TV More Than Dogs?

By Linda Cole

I was watching a program on TV awhile back about birds. At one point I noticed several of my cats sitting in front of the TV watching intently. Other than a rare quick glance at the cats, my dogs didn’t pay any attention to the program we were watching. Cats have a tendency to watch TV more than dogs, because it’s easier for them to view what’s on the screen.

We can thank a handful of inventors for coming up with the idea for television, but the person credited with sending the first successful transmission on September 7, 1927 goes to Philo Farnsworth. He was a 14 year old high school student when he began to dream about the concept of TV while living on a farm that had no electricity. Ironically, after his invention became commonplace, Farnsworth wouldn’t let his children watch TV because he believed the programming was too dumbed down.

Radio waves fly through the air at the speed of light as patterns of unseen electricity and magnetism. When you turn on your television, a series of tiny dots of light called pixels flash on the screen in a specific pattern according to the video signal received. The patterns are seen by our eyes and transmitted to the brain where the tiny dots are organized into an image we recognize. We see movement because the image on the TV screen is refreshed hundreds of times a second, giving the illusion of movement. We don’t notice it because it’s faster than our eyes can see.

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How to Help a Mother Dog Wean Her Puppies

By Laurie Darroch

When it’s time for a mother dog to wean her puppies, she knows what to do naturally. You can help the process along if you need to though. Generally, a mother dog begins to wean her puppies at about three or four weeks of age. Weaning usually ends at about eight weeks, but it is a gradual process over a period of weeks, not an instant removal of nursing.

During the nursing period, the puppies are beginning to learn proper behavior and socialization skills from their mother and through the interactions with their siblings. They also get nurturing and bonding during the nursing period, so they have a sense of belonging. Because a puppy’s vision is limited in the first couple weeks, they need to stay close to their mother. Nursing is not only food and nutrition; it provides a sense of security for the puppies.

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Human Habits That Annoy Our Canine Friends

habits annoy benBy Linda Cole

We all have little habits that can be annoying. Those closest to us may or may not point them out, and often we aren’t even aware of things we do that irritate others. Some of our imperfect human habits can even annoy our dogs. Of course, our canine friends overlook most of our little imperfections, although they would appreciate it if we could see things from their point of view.

Don’t tell me what you want – show me

Talking to your dog is important, and it can help make him smarter when you teach him names of family members, other pets, toys, shapes and common objects around the house. The sound of your voice makes him happy, and your tone of voice helps him understand commands, praise and when you’re unhappy with him. However, verbal communication will never replace body language, from a dog’s point of view.

So often, our words don’t match our body language and we end up sending confusing instructions. A good example is asking your dog to stay while leaning towards him with your hand held up like a school crossing guard stopping cars. Your body language is indicating you want your dog to come, not stay. Talk less during training sessions and use your body language to send signals your dog understands much better. You might be surprised to discover how easy it is to communicate with your dog without talking to him.

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Rituals Can Strengthen the Bond with Your Cat

cat rituals trishBy Julia Williams

Recently, a Facebook friend posted a link to an article about cats that really got my goat. It claimed a scientific study had determined that cats hate it when you touch them and only pretend to love humans for the fringe benefits we provide. “While cats may look all fuzzy and adorable on the outside, research shows that they really are the cold, unfeeling monsters the world thinks they are,” the article stated.

It’s not the first time an obviously anti-cat person went on a diatribe about what awful, unloving creatures cats are, and I’m sure it won’t be the last. What I found particularly egregious about this one was the use of “science” to back up the author’s negative feelings about cats.

I told my friend that this was the most ridiculous article I have ever read. It was ridiculous because anyone who loves cats knows that every statement the cat hater made was untrue. We don’t need science to tell us that if we take the time to understand our cats as individuals and find ways to bond with them, that they will – and most certainly do – love us back. My cats Mickey, Rocky and Annabelle are positive proof of that.

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Top 10 Most Searched Dog Questions According to Google

By Linda Cole

Dogs are complicated individuals with their own unique and sometimes puzzling behaviors. Why dogs do the things they do is something all pet owners ponder from time to time. Thankfully, we have Google to help – they put together the top ten most searched questions about dogs in 2014.

10. Why do dogs bury bones? This behavior is called hoarding or caching, and goes back to early ancestors of dogs. Stashing food protects it from other animals that want to steal it. Uneaten prey and bones were hidden in a cache near the den. Burying the leftovers helped preserve a kill because it was cooler underground and hidden from flies and other insects. When prey was scarce, dogs could go back to their cache for something to eat. Most dogs today have plenty to eat, but the instinct to bury food is a hardwired behavior, which is why you may find stashes of CANIDAE kibble hidden around your home.

9. How to introduce dogs? Each dog is an individual, and knowing what he likes and dislikes, how he plays, what his energy level is, and how well he was socialized with other animals are all pluses when you decide to add a second dog to your home. Introducing a new dog to one already in your home should be done calmly, slowly and with patience. Pay careful attention to the body language of both dogs and never leave them unsupervised until they are comfortable and calm with each other.

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