Basic Facts Dog Owners Should Always Remember

basic facts paolo 2By Langley Cornwell

Life gets busy and can sometimes be overwhelming. There is so much going on in our world, in our neighborhoods and in our households that it’s easy to get caught up in things. Let’s face it – sometimes it takes all of our focus just to get from one task to the next. Even so, your dog is counting on you to be a responsible pet owner.

It’s important to remember that your dog does not understand all of your time restrictions and commitments. He doesn’t understand that you need to work, grocery shop, exercise, socialize, attend classes, cook meals, fold laundry, clean the house, etc. He just knows that he loves you. He also knows, on some level, that he needs mental and physical stimulation as well as quality play time in order to be a happy, well-adjusted pooch. He needs to socialize with you and bond with you. It’s easy to forget this in our chaotic lives but the fact is, our pets need some of our time.

This article is getting back to basics; it’s a friendly reminder of what sharing your life with a dog should look like.

Time
basic facts greeblie
Most dogs only live 10 to 15 years, and it will go by fast. So no matter how hectic things get, carve out a bit of quality time for your dog every day. Ideally, the time of day would be similar from one day to the next, so your dog could joyfully anticipate this special time. That’s ideal but not necessary. What is necessary is that you have one-on-one time, just the two of you, and that your dog gets your undivided attention during that time.

Another consideration under the heading of “time” is this: try not to leave your dog alone for extended periods of time. These days, many dogs are at home alone during their person’s entire work day. Often they’re lonely and bored. This is a tough issue to solve, but try to make some arrangements so your dog does not languish the day away just waiting for your arrival.

Exposure

Just like people, dogs need to mix things up sometimes; they like to visit new places and have new experiences. Even if they seem shy and frightened, ease your pup into new situations so he will learn to be more trusting and confident.

Additionally, dogs like to learn new tricks, especially if it means spending more time with basic facts skycaptain resizedyou. Your dog will do anything to make you happy, so learning new things and then getting praise and perhaps a tasty CANIDAE grain free treat is your dog’s idea of heaven.

Patience

Dogs do not understand our words unless they are taught. They try to do what we want them to, but it’s up to us to learn how to communicate with them. I once lived with a female German shepherd who was (and probably still is) the smartest dog I’ve ever shared my life with. I used to say I didn’t need to train her because she would do anything I asked her to, if she understood my wishes. This dog was amazing and she taught me that it’s all about communication.  Be patient with your dog, and learn to communicate with him/her.

Likewise, don’t get mad when your dog does something wrong. If you catch him in the act, communicate your wishes and then move on. Otherwise, take a deep breath, clean it up, and let it go.

Care

Make sure your dog always has plenty of clean, fresh water and feed him a nutritious diet of premium dog food like CANIDAE. It’s up to you to keep his toenails clipped, his teeth healthy, his ears clean and his fur brushed (see, I told you this article was back to basics). Don’t leave a dog outside in scorching heat or frigid cold. Pay attention to his behavior and seek veterinary care if he begins to act unusual.

When you bring a new dog into your life, you make a lifetime commitment. Sometimes it’s good to be reminded of how basic, yet important, our responsibilities are.

Top photo by Paulo Brandao/Flickr
Middle photo by greeblie/Flickr
Bottom photo by skycaptaintwo/Flickr

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Can Dogs and Cats See Things We Can’t?

dogs see Perry 2By Linda Cole

Scientists have known for decades that some mammals, bees, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish are capable of seeing ultraviolet light. A new study published earlier this year has added dogs and cats to the list of animals that can see UV light. This means that dogs and cats can see things we can’t, which might explain why your pet stares at something that’s invisible to you.

On the color spectrum, the visible light we can see includes red, orange, yellow, green, blue and violet. Ultraviolet light sits above violet, and is invisible to us because the lenses in our eyes block out ultraviolet wavelengths that can be harmful. UV light has shorter wavelengths than the visible light we can see.

Before this study came out, scientists believed dogs and cats also had protective lenses on their eyes that would filter out UV light, but they don’t. They have UV transparent lenses which allow the light to enter into the retina where it’s converted into nerve signals, sent to the brain and processed by the visual system. In addition to dogs and cats, rodents, hedgehogs, ferrets and okapis (an African animal related to giraffes) were all added to the list of animals with transparent lens. And the amount of UV light they can detect is significant.

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Five Funny Things Dogs Do to “Help Out”

dogs help herb neufeldBy Laurie Darroch

If you look at the world from a dog’s point of view, their antics begin to make more sense. Dogs are loyal to levels that are often amazing. They are also anxious to be involved and helpful. So, try to be more flexible and open minded in your thinking when you try to figure out their behavior.  According to them, they are just trying to help.

Clean Up

Dogs are great little vacuum cleaners. They are always eager to clean up any bit of spilled food and will sit right under your feet during meal time to vacuum up any dropped bits. They particularly love outdoor eating at a picnic or barbecue. They help keep the ants away by getting to the spilled food first.

Dogs love babies in high chairs who toss food around. That makes them feel extra helpful providing both a child care and clean up service simultaneously. If you spill something with liquid, sauce or cream, dogs are instant mops, lapping up the spill before you even have a chance to clean it up. They often provide this bonus service with a wagging tail.

Often forward thinkers, very eager dogs will quietly walk under the table and put their head on your lap or feet, to catch the food before it reaches the ground. If you happen to put your hand down with something in it and that bit of food falls directly into their mouth, that is even better.

When you are all done eating, they will happily lick off any dirty plates they can reach when you are busy doing something else. They just think you forgot to finish cleaning up, and are happy to chip in and cut down on your work.

Your dog will gladly help you clean out the open bag of CANIDAE Pure Heaven Biscuits you mistakenly left sitting on the coffee table. They want to prevent it from falling on the floor and making a mess that you will have to clean up later.

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Life Lessons for Puppies

life lessons freewineBy Linda Cole

The learning process begins the minute we are born, and it’s the same with puppies. Behaviors that pups are allowed to develop – both good and bad – will follow them into adulthood, and it’s much easier to deal with behavioral issues at a young age. Our job is to bond with and love a puppy, but we are also responsible for discipline and teaching him how we want him to behave. Even dogs have life experiences that mold their perspective and attitude about their environment, people and events they will encounter. The life lessons a puppy should learn will follow him into adulthood and create a more stable and self confident dog who is better equipped to handle whatever life throws his way.

Socialization

Behavioral issues in adult dogs are often rooted in lessons not learned at an early age. If a puppy isn’t given adequate opportunity to learn how to react to different experiences, he will have a harder time discerning what is safe and what isn’t. An aggressive or anxious response based in fear is best addressed at a young age. Puppies learn through positive and negative experiences how to react to different situations. When a pup is allowed to develop behavior that won’t be acceptable when he’s older, like jumping up on people or protecting his food, bad habits left unchecked will likely become a lifelong issue and harder to correct when he’s older.

Pups should be introduced to people of all ages, different sounds, sights, and situations when they are between the age of 6-14 weeks. This is when a puppy can best develop his own perception of his world and learn how to react appropriately.

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Llamas and Alpacas as Therapy Animals? Why Not!

Rojo-HiResFloralBy Julia Williams

First there were therapy dogs. Then came therapy cats. More recently, the list of therapy animals has expanded to include horses, rabbits, guinea pigs, potbellied pigs…even llamas and alpacas! It seems people have finally begun to realize what I have known for most of my life – that virtually any animal has the capability to help our seniors, special needs children, hospital patients, rehabilitation facility residents and others who need cheering up.

When it comes to therapy animals, size doesn’t matter because animals are so pure of heart and willing to lend a paw (or a hoof) to spread cheer. Case in point: a big, shaggy-haired llama named Rojo and an equally hairy alpaca named Napoleon can bring on the smiles every bit as much as a fluffy little dog can!

Admittedly, llamas and alpacas might not be the first species that comes to mind when you think of therapy animals. However, the Mountain Peaks Therapy Llamas & Alpacas don’t let this stop them from visiting schools, hospitals, senior communities and rehab facilities throughout Portland, OR and Vancouver, WA. Offering friendship and a warm hug, these very special therapy animals help alleviate loneliness and reduce stress, and their presence brings a sense of normalcy to institutional settings.

rojoreading revMountain Peaks, a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation, offers therapy teams that have successfully completed the Animal-Assisted Therapy Certification process. Rojo was their first therapy animal; this unusually people-friendly llama received his Certification in 2007. Since then, the Mountain Peaks menagerie – Rojo, Smokey, Beni and Little Chap (llamas), and Napoleon, Jean-Pierre and Andre (alpacas), have completed more than 900 therapeutic visits. Mountain Peaks also provides theme-decorated llamas and alpacas for birthday parties, BBQs, weddings and other private and corporate events.

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What Do Dogs Think About?

dogs_think_jeffreywBy Linda Cole

Ivan Pavlov, a Russian scientist, won the Nobel Prize in Physiology in 1904 for his work on the digestive system of mammals. He is famous for his revelation in classical conditioning. Pavlov discovered by accident that the dogs in his lab had learned to associate food with his lab assistants. They would salivate when any of the assistants entered the room whether they had food or not. It was a response to a stimuli and something the dogs learned on their own. Classical conditioning was the first step in beginning to understand how dogs think.

From the beginning of the 1900s up to the 1960s, scientists focused on dog behavior, but they lost interest and didn’t resume studying canines until the beginning of the 21st century. For the last 14 years, scientists have found a renewed interest in canine research to better understand a dog’s body language – including subtle signs they use, how they think, how they learn, the emotions they feel, how they view their world, and what they like. As we learn more about why dogs behave in certain ways, we have a better understanding of the canine mind and what dogs think about.

Of course, the answer to the question of what dogs think about is as complex as it is in determining what humans think about. We don’t have the ability to get inside the mind of another person to understand precisely what’s going on in their mind, nor can you really understand what your dog is thinking about when he’s staring at you. I know from personal experience how good some dogs are at problem solving, especially if they are trying to figure out a way to escape from their enclosure or steal food behind your back.

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